15 de abril de 2021

2 weeks to City Nature Challenge - and a video to share

The new City Nature Challenge video is up now. It's posted on YouTube and on Vimeo,. Feel free to share it far and wide!

Ingresado el 15 de abril de 2021 por marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

24 de marzo de 2021

Count down to CNC 2021 begins

The first of my countdown journal posts is up. If you join the project, the posts will appear in your iNat feed on the dashboard.

https://inaturalist.ca/projects/city-nature-challenge-2021-winnipeg-region/journal

Ingresado el 24 de marzo de 2021 por marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

17 de marzo de 2021

City Nature Challenge April 30 to May 4 2021

Hop on the bandwagon and join those marking off April 30 to May 4 to participate in the annual City Nature Challenge - a 4 day bio blitz.

Participating communities are setting up their projects - you can see the growing global list at https://citynaturechallenge.org/ ; and the Canadian participants at https://cwf-fcf.org/en/explore/inaturalist/cnc/

Not near any of these? That's okay - join City Nature Challenge 2021: Global Project - for all those observers who would like to contribute but are in Thompson or Brandon; Riding Mountain National Park or Wapusk National Park, Pinawa or Emerson - or anywhere at all on earth not included in one of the established CNC survey areas on the four days in question.

If this sounds like you, click on the link >> https://inaturalist.ca/projects/city-nature-challenge-2021-global-project and join up for your observations from those 4 days to be included in the big total.

Ingresado el 17 de marzo de 2021 por marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21 de febrero de 2021

01 de diciembre de 2020

the willow family in Manitoba - the state of play...

In many Manitoba locations, willow family members are the dominant plants present, shaping the environment for the other organisms located there. VASCAN provides checklists of the plant species occur in each Canadian province including the willow family. Here is an overview of the Manitoba iNat data as of the end of November 2020 for each willow family species on their Manitoba checklist...

Salicaceae, willow family 1,079 40% RG
Populus - poplars, cottonwoods, aspens 579 57% RG
Populus tremuloides - Trembling aspen tree, native 317 81% RG
Populus balsamifera - Balsam poplar tree, native 91 48% RG
Populus deltoides - Eastern cottonwood tree, native 83 25% RG
Populus alba - White poplar tree, introduced 24 29% RG
Populus grandidentata - Bigtooth Aspen tree, native 3 33% RG
Salix - willows 488 20% RG
Salix interior - Interior Sandbar Willow shrub, native 103 66% RG
Salix discolor - American Pussy Willow shrub, native 28 29% RG
Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow tree or shrub, native 16 6% RG
Salix reticulata - Net-leaved Willow shrub, native 13 69% RG
Salix petiolaris - Meadow Willow shrub, native 9 0% RG
Salix candida - Hoary Willow shrub, native 7 42% RG
Salix alba - White Willow tree, introduced 6 0% RG
Salix bebbiana - Bebb's Willow shrub, native 6 33% RG
Salix arctophila - Arctic Willow shrub, native 5 100% RG
Salix eriocephala - Heart-leaved Willow shrub, native 4 0% RG
Salix humilis - Prairie Willow shrub, native 3 0% RG
Salix lucida - Shining Willow shrub, native 3 0% RG
Salix scouleriana - Scouler's Willow tree or shrub, native 3 0% RG
Salix calcicola - Lanate Willow shrub, native 1 100% RG
Salix fuscescens - Alaska Bog Willow shrub, native 1 100% RG
Salix glauca - Grey Willow shrub, native 1 0% RG
Salix pedicellaris - Bog Willow shrub, native 1 0% RG
Salix planifolia - Tea-leafed Willow shrub, native 1 0% RG
Salix pyrifolia - Balsam Willow shrub, native 1 0% RG
Salix serissima - Autumn Willow shrub, native 1 0% RG
Salix × fragilis - Hybrid Crack Willow tree, introduced 1 0% RG
Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow tree or shrub, native 0 -
Salix arbusculoides - Little-tree Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix athabascensis - Athabasca Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix brachycarpa - Short-fruit Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix famelica - (starved willow) shrub, native 0 -
Salix herbacea - Least Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix lasiandra - Pacific Willow tree or shrub, native 0 -
Salix maccalliana - McCalla's Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix myrtillifolia - Myrtle-leaf Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix pellita - Satiny Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix pentandra - Laurel Willow shrub, introduced 0 -
Salix pseudomonticola - False Mountain Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix pseudomyrsinites (tall blueberry willow) shrub, native 0 -
Salix richardsonii - Lanate Willow shrub, native 0 -
Salix vestita - Rock willow shrub, native 0 -

Ingresado el 01 de diciembre de 2020 por marykrieger marykrieger | 1 observación | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

26 de julio de 2020

Rosa in Manitoba

Delimiting Species Boundaries in Rosa Sect. Cinnamomeae (Rosaceae) in Eastern North America
SIMON JOLY and ANNE BRUNEAU
Systematic Botany (2007), 32(4): pp. 819–836
https://www.webdepot.umontreal.ca/Usagers/jolysi/MonDepotPublic/jolylab/pdf/Joly&Bruneau_2007_SystBot.pdf

1.    Hypanthium glabrous........................................................................................... 2
      2.    Long and straight prickles present throughout the stems..................................... R. acicularis (MB)
      2.    Prickles absent from the stems or, if present, either short (bristles) or curved........................ 3
             3.    Infrastipular prickles stout and broad-based..........................................R. virginiana
             3.    Infrastipular prickles absent or not especially stout or broad-based............................. 4
                    4.    Generally fewer than 2 hairs per mm2 on the abaxial leaf surface;
                            infrastipular prickles always absent on new stems; 
                            bristles always present on new stems; 
                            leaflets from 7 to 9 per leaf..................R. arkansana (MB)
                    4.    Generally  more  than  2  hairs  per  mm2 on  the  abaxial  leaf  surface;  
                            infrastipular  prickles  either  present  or absent on new stems; 
                            bristles generally absent on new stems; 
                            leaflets from 5 to 7 per leaf....R. blanda (MB)  includes R. woodsii
1.    Hypanthium with glands   . .................................................................... 5
      5.    Bristles present on new branches............................................................ 6
             6.    Hairs present on the abaxial surface of the terminal leaflet...................................... 7
                     7.    Infrastipular prickles present...................................................R. carolina
                     7.    Infrastipular prickles absent    . .................................................R. arkansana (MB)
             6.    Hairs absent on the abaxial surface of the terminal leaflet.................................R. nitida
      5.    Bristles absent on new branches............................................................. 8
             8.    Width of the terminal leaflet less than 9 mm    . . ........................................R. foliolosa
             8.    Width of the terminal leaflet more than 9 mm    . .............................................. 9
                     9.    Hypanthium typically with more than 86 glands;
                           terminal leaflet oblong, 
                           generally with more than 20 small teeth per margin..........................................................R. palustris
                     9.    Hypanthium typically with fewer than 86 glands;
                           terminal leaflet ovate, elliptic or obovate, 
                           generally with fewer than 20 teeth per margin..................................................... 10
                            10.  Bristles  absent  on  new  stems;  
                                   auricles  more  than  3.8 mm  long;  
                                   stipules more  than  1.1 mm  wide;
                                   infrastipular prickles stout, broad based, and often curved......................R. virginiana
                           10.  Bristles present or absent on new stems; 
                                  auricles less than 3.8 mm long; 
                                  stipules less than 1.1 mm wide; 
                                  infrastipular prickles slender and not especially broad based or curved   ..............R. carolina

Glossary

Hypanthium = a cuplike or tubular enlargement of the receptacle of a flower, loosely surrounding the gynoecium or united with it (the thing that becomes the outside of the rose hip)

glabrous = smooth, hairless

glands = a plant structure which secretes one or more products. This may be located on or near the plant surface and secrete externally, or be internal to the plant and secrete into a canal or reservoir.

infrastipular - at the base of a node - on a stem the place where a bud occurs

auricle - small ear-like projection from the base of a leaf or petal.

abaxial - the underside

Ingresado el 26 de julio de 2020 por marykrieger marykrieger | 1 comentario | Deja un comentario

09 de julio de 2020

Desiderata

before you post…

  • assess your comfort level
  • find comfort in discomfort (Stay engaged - the journey is worth the effort.)
  • be vulnerable
  • address strong emotions
while in discussion…
  • Reiterate.
    Restate to limit misunderstanding.

  • Contemplate.
    Move away from immediate emotional responses towards a deeper understanding of the topic opened up by the contributions of others.

  • Respire.
    Take a breath to settle thoughts and emotions during difficult conversations.

  • Communicate.
    Speak with compassion and thoughtfulness. Assume good intentions. Seek understanding. If challenge is appropriate (be careful!), challenge the statement rather than the person who said it.

rephrased from 'Let's Talk, Discussing Race, Racism and Other Difficult Topics with Students'. Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Ingresado el 09 de julio de 2020 por marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

30 de abril de 2019

Birds Hill Provincial Park - Cedar Bog Trail

More than 250 trees have been cut down along the Cedar Bog nature trail upland loop in Birds Hill Provincial Park. By far the largest number of trees removed were bur oaks, along with many aspen some very large and some spruce.

The stumps left have been cleared at or below ground level with a chainsaw. In some cases the trunks cut into four foot sections were still stacked beside the trail.

I found the impact of the removal of these trees heartbreaking. This is a self guided hiking trail though a natural landscape. In some cases, this trail has been widened to more than fifteen feet wide.

The recent trails management plan recently absolutely nothing about widening this trail. Here's the link...
https://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/pubs/parks-protected-spaces/birds_hill_trails_plan.pdf

I am trying to find out why but as yet have had no response from anyone I have reached out to.

Ingresado el 30 de abril de 2019 por marykrieger marykrieger | 12 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

30 de septiembre de 2018

September 29 - Interlake Pioneer Trail / Inwood Wildlife Management Area (north block)

4 pm to 6:30 pm; 6.58 km (there and back)

identified but not photographed...
Garter Snake
Common Raven
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Pied-Billed Grebe
Blue-winged Teal
Dark-eyed Junco

Trail information from the ATV club that maintains the trail
http://www.siatvclub.com/interlake-pioneer-trail.html

Wildlife Management Areas in Manitoba
http://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/wildlife/habcons/wmas/gMap/index.html

All my observations on that day
https://www.inaturalist.org/calendar/marykrieger/2018/9/29

Ingresado el 30 de septiembre de 2018 por marykrieger marykrieger | 11 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

28 de agosto de 2018

Why did I post such a poor out-of focus picture?

Those who view my observations will sometimes find one with an image that is incredibly poor. This can be disconcerting, especially for those who wish to use their identification skills to help me out. Here is how I decide to post them.

I always use the best image I have of an organism for the observation. You can depend on that being the very best image that i could capture that day of that species in that area.

If I have seen the organism before in that habitat, I hold myself to a higher quality of image. I should feel that there is a reasonable chance of identifying the organism using characteristics visible to an observer in the image.

The really really bad images are of organisms novel to me where those are the only image(s) I have of them.

Now the why :)

Organism identification methods make assumptions over the access that the identifier has to the organism. For some groups of organisms, identifying from a photograph can be near impossible using current keys. For others, careful photography can reveal the field marks needed for a secure identification.

An observer who has clocked many hours of experience with a specific organism can recognize a species or subspecies instantly while many of us are still struggling to decide where to start.

iNaturalist has added a third type of identification - computer vision - specifically Fine-Grained Visual Categorization (FGVC). And this is the real reason I add these poor photos.

To be useful to this identification, the image does not have to be in focus but it does have to be exclusively of the organism. If there are enough observations of the organism that have been identified by human observers, an algorithm can identify this type of poor image.

Right now, we aren't there yet for most organisms. As the database grows and the number of research observations increase, this type of identification will become more and more useful.

While I am waiting for that to happen, sometimes I get lucky and even the crappiest photo gets an id from an experienced observer. (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14361398) In any case, I have a reminder to watch out for a better photograph the next time I see that particular elusive subject. :)

Ingresado el 28 de agosto de 2018 por marykrieger marykrieger | 1 observación | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario