Ícono
Fotos / Sonidos
Especie / Nombre del taxón
Observador
Lugar
Acciones

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Capuchina Tropaeolum majus

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 10:50 AM PDT

Descripción

A Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus), photographed among the jetty rocks near the Oyster Point Marina in South San Francisco, CA. It appears to have naturalized itself at this location.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cardo Abrepuño Centaurea solstitialis

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Junio 20, 2020 11:00 AM PDT

Descripción

Some Yellow Star Thistle (Centaurea solstitialis), photographed along Spreckles Avenue in northern San Jose, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Estornino Pinto Europeo Sturnus vulgaris

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Julio 18, 2018 10:23 AM PDT

Descripción

A half dozen European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), photographed on some transmission lines near Moffett Channel, just north of the Sunnyvale Water Pollution Control Plant (SWPCP) in Sunnyvale, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Huilota Común Zenaida macroura

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 19, 2020 09:45 AM PDT

Descripción

A Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura), photographed in the Owl Burrow Picnic Area of Sunnyvale Baylands Park in northern Santa Clara County, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Chorlo Gris Pluvialis squatarola

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 20, 2020 01:03 PM PDT

Descripción

Four Black-bellied Plovers (Pluvialis squatarola), photographed at Coyote Point Recreation Area in San Mateo, CA. These birds were photographed at the edge of some mudflats immediately south of the Coyote Point Yacht Harbor. They have all molted into basic (winter) plumage, which lacks the stark, black belly that they exhibit during the spring and summer months.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Andarríos Manchado Actitis macularius

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 7, 2020 10:48 AM PDT

Descripción

A Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius), photographed on an offshore rock that was visible from the San Francisco Bay Trail, not far from Anza Lagoon in Burlingame, CA. This Spotted Sandpiper is in basic (winter) plumage, so it does not have the spots on its breast that it has in the spring and summer.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Avoceta Americana Recurvirostra americana

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 20, 2020 12:19 PM PDT

Descripción

A flock of American Avocets (Recurvirostra americana) photographed at Coyote Point Recreation Area in San Mateo, CA. This flock was observed in the shallows to the immediate south of the Coyote Point Yacht Harbor.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Estornino Pinto Europeo Sturnus vulgaris

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Agosto 23, 2020 09:15 AM PDT

Descripción

A European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), observed and photographed on the roof ot the Seaport Conference Center, near the Redwood Landing Marina in Redwood City, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Paloma Asiática Bravía Columba livia

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 03:22 PM PDT

Descripción

Some Rock Pigeons (Columba livia), photographed on some telephone lines along Bradford Way, not far from the Sharp Park Golf Course in Pacifica, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Aguililla Cola Roja Buteo jamaicensis

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 03:40 PM PDT

Descripción

A Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), photographed as it was perched on the bough of a large Monterey Cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) at the Sharp Park Golf Course in Pacifica, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Agosto 22, 2020 10:56 AM PDT

Descripción

A Western Sea Slater (Ligia occidentalis), photographed at Ravenswood Open Space Preserve in Menlo Park, CA. This individual was observed at low tide, on some rocks near the western terminus of the Dumbarton Bridge. This species is similar to the Common Rock Louse (Ligia pallasii), but has much longer uropods (the long appendages projecting from the last abdominal segment). L. occidentalis is also found on rocky beaches such as the one at this location; L. pallasii favors caves and rock crevices in cliff faces.

References:
1) Morris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press. See p. 544-545 for the species description for L. occidentalis, and p. 545 for the species description for L. pallasii.
2) Cowles, Dave (2005). Ligia (Megaligia) occidentalis Dana, 1853. Invertebrates of the Salish Sea Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Malacostraca/Eumalacostraca/Peracarida/Isopoda/Oniscoidea/Family_Ligiidae/Ligia_occidentalis.html
3) Leno, Heidee (2002). Ligia (Ligia) pallasii Brandt, 1833. Invertebrates of the Sailish Sea. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Malacostraca/Eumalacostraca/Peracarida/Isopoda/Oniscoidea/Family_Ligiidae/Ligia_(Ligia)_pallasii.html
4) Mutch, Robert (2016, May 24). Common Rock Louse (Ligia occidentalis), Martin Creek Beach, Trinidad, CA, USA [video]/ Youtube. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TW_pCziDJrY

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Percebe Bellota del Pacífico Balanus glandula

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Agosto 22, 2020 09:45 AM PDT

Descripción

Some Pacific Acorn Barnacles (Balanus glandula), photographed at Ravenswood Open Space Preserve in Menlo Park, CA. I found these barnacles in the high intertidal zone along San Francisco Bay, not far from the western terminus of the Dumbarton Bridge. It was a fairly common species here, forming large colonies on these rocks.

Note that there are three photographs in the set of pictures documenting this species:

Shot 1, which provides a close-up, lateral view of a few of these barnacles;
Shot 2, which provides a close-up aperture view for some of the barnacles. This view shows the plates that the animal can open when the tide is in (to allow it to feed) and close when the tide is out (to protect it from dessication).

Shot 3, which provides a view of a colony of these barnacles. This colony is quite crowded, which has caused some of the barnacles to develop a weird-looking, columnar form.

Identification is tentative, based on the following observed characteristics:

1) These barnacles are of small to medium size, with no barnacle being larger than about 20 mm in diameter, and no taller than 20 mm in height.
2) The barnacles external walls consist of 6 separate plates, which are easier to tell apart for B. glandula than they are for other species of barnacles. The external plates for this species tend to be irregularly triangular in shape and rough in appearance. These plates are joined together to form a rough cone shape.
3) In the animal's aperture, there are two movable large plates (the scuta) and two movable small plates (the terga) that protect the animal inside when they are closed. The line of contact between the terga and the scuta is sinuous, which distinguishes B. glandula from most of the other (native) intertidal species of barnacle in the area.

4) In the wall of each barnacle, the three plates closest to the scuta overlap with each other. There is also a basal plate that joins all six plates, which can be seen in the remains of dead barnacles in Shot 3.
5) These barnacles are located in the high intertidal zone. B. glandula is the only Balanus species that is found this high up on the shoreline. Balanus crenatus, which is similar to B. glandula, is found in the low intertidal and below. The similar but much larger species, Menesiniella aquila (formerly Balanus aquila) is also found at the low intertidal and below. The Northern Acorn Barnacle (Semibalanus balanoides) is very similar to B. glandula and can sometimes be found in the high intertidal zone, but S. balanoides is a northern species that is not found in California.

I consider this identification to be fairly tentative, however, because San Francisco Bay is notorious for harboring numerous non-native marine invertebrate species, including non-native barnacles. It is entirely possible that this identification could be off. Corrections and suggestions are welcome!

References:
1) Morris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrate of California. Stanford University. See p. 520-521 for the species description for B. glandula, p. 521-522 for the species description for B. crenata, and p. 525 for the species description for B. aquila (now Menesiniella aquila).
2) Cowles, David (2005). Balanus glandula Darwin, 1854. Invertebrates of the Salish Sea. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Maxillopoda/Cirripedia/Balanus_glandula.html
3) Hiebert, T.C. and M. Jarvis. 2015. Balanus glandula. In: Oregon Estuarine Invertebrates: Rudys' Illustrated Guide to Common Species, 3rd ed. T.C. Hiebert, B.A. Butler and A.L. Shanks (eds.). University of Oregon Libraries and Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, Charleston, OR. Retrieved from the University of Oregon Scholar's Bank on 9/24/20 from https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1794/12694/B_glandula_2015_final.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y
4) Watanabe, James (2017). Barnacles - sessile crustaceans. SEANET Nearshore Plants and Animals of the Monterey Bay. Retrieved on 9/23/20 from https://seanet.stanford.edu/Barnacles
5) Balanus glandula (n.d.), Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balanus_glandula
6) Cowles, David (2006).

Balanus crenatus Bruguiere, 1789. Invertebrates of the Salish Sea. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Maxillopoda/Cirripedia/Balanus_crenatus.html
7) Balanus crenatus (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balanus_crenatus
8) Balanus aquila (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balanus_aquila
9) Semibalanus balanoides (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/24/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semibalanus_balanoides

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Junio 27, 2020 09:28 AM PDT

Descripción

A Pink Volcano Barnacle (Tetraclita rubescens), phtographed amongst the mid-intertidal tidepools at Bean Hollow State Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. This is a fairly distinctive species, which really does look like a volcano with pink lava flowing down its sides. The "lava" consists of numerous overlapping, exterior platelets that attach to and help buttress the plates forming the barnacle's outer wall. These overlapping platelets give the barnacle's exterior a "thatched" appearance, making it one of only a handful of barnacle species on the west coast of the USA which have this characteristic.

What makes this barnacle truly unique, however, is its outer wall. Its outer wall consists of only four plates, which can be observed (in this case) by noting the number of angles in the barnacle's aperture. As far as I know, T. rubescens is the only barnacle species on the west coast of the USA whose outer wall consists of only four plates.

That said, I am by no means an expert on barnacles, so it's entirely possible that this identification is off. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

Overall Dimensions:
1) Height: ~2 cm
2) Diameter of base: ~2 cm roughly
3) Width of aperture at broadest point: ~1 cm

References:
1) Morris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press. See p. 517-518 for the species description.
2) UC Santa Cruz (n.d.). Tetraclita rubescens (Darwin 1854). Multi-Agency Rocky Intertidal Network (MARINe). Retrieved on 9/23/20 from https://marine.ucsc.edu/target/target-species-tetraclita.html
3) Watanabe, James (2017). Barnacles - sessile crustaceans. SEANET Nearshore Plants and Animals of the Monterey Bay. Retrieved on 9/23/20 from https://seanet.stanford.edu/Barnacles
4) Nunnery, T. Van (2008). Tetraclita rubescens; Red Thatched Barnacle. CalPhotos. Retrieved on 9/23/20 from https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0108+0357
5) Tetraclita rubescens (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/23/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraclita_rubescens

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 12:12 PM PDT

Descripción

A Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) and a Sunburst Anemone (Anthopleura sola), photographed in a tidepool at Corcoran Beach in Santa Cruz County, CA. The Giant Green Anemone is the animal on the left; it can be readily identified from its large size, solid green tentacles, and solid green oral disc. This means that the Sunburst Anemone is the animal on the right; it can be identified as A. sola from the bluish radial banding that is visible in the lower left quadrant of its oral disc. The olive green coor of its tentacles and oral disc, as well as the white banding on its tentacles, are fairly common featues for this species.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 12:12 PM PDT

Descripción

A Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) and a Sunburst Anemone (Anthopleura sola), photographed in a tidepool at Corcoran Beach in Santa Cruz County, CA. The Giant Green Anemone is the animal on the left; it can be readily identified from its large size, solid green tentacles, and solid green oral disc. This means that the Sunburst Anemone is the animal on the right; it can be identified as A. sola from the bluish radial banding that is visible in the lower left quadrant of its oral disc. The olive green coor of its tentacles and oral disc, as well as the white banding on its tentacles, are fairly common featues for this species.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 09:16 AM PDT

Descripción

A population of Eastern Mud Snails (Tritia obsoleta), discovered in a salt marsh near the Oyster Point Marina in South San Francisco, CA. These were located not far from the San Francisco Bay Trail, which travels through this area. T. obsoleta is an invasive, non-native species that gathers in huge numbers in the salt marshes along San Francisco Bay, out-competing such native species as the California Horn Snail (Cerithideopsis californica).

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 09:19 AM PDT

Descripción

An Eastern Mud Snail (Tritia obsoleta), photographed along the San Francisco Bay Trail near the Oyster Point Marina in South San Francisco, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Caracol Lapa Lottia scabra

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Abril 27, 2017 09:43 PM PDT

Descripción

A pair of Rough Limpets (Lottia scabra), photographed on some rocks at Mavericks Beach near the Pillar Point headland. This beach is located in the town of El Granada in coastal San Mateo County, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Agosto 15, 2020 10:06 AM PDT

Descripción

The body (possibly a molt?) of a Slender Crab (Metacarcinus gracilis), discovered in the swash zone of Cove Beach at Año Nuevo State Park in coastal San Mateo County, CA. Note that there are three photographs in the set of pictures docuenting this specimen:

Shot 1, which provides a fairly close-up view of the crab, as viewed from the front;
Shot 2, which provides a somewhat more distant frontal view of the crab with a view of the chelae (pincers) from a different angle.

Shot 3, which provides a view of the underside of the crab, and in particular, a view of its tail flap.

Had I known more about identifying crabs, I would have obtained a pure dorsal shot of this crab (i.e., a shot from directly above); unfortunately, I didn't obtain such a shot. However, it seems that I can identify this crab (at least tentatively) using the pictures that I did take.

The shape of this crab's carapace suggests that it is one of the cancrid crabs, so called because these crabs all once belonged to the genus Cancer. These crabs have since been split off into separate genera. In California, these included the Dungeness Crab (Metacarcinus magister), the Slender Crab (Metacarcinus gracilis), the Yellow Crab (Metacarcinus anthonyi), the Pacific Rock Crab (Romalaon antennarium), the Hairy Crab (Romalaon jordani), the Pygmy Rock Crab (Glebocarcinus oregonensis), and the Red Crab (Cancer productus). [1]

I now note that the crab in my photographs have claws on their chelipeds that have white tips. Of the seven species listed above, only two are known to have white-tipped claws - the Dungeness Crab (Metacarcinus magister) and the Slender Crab (Metacarcinus gracilis). All of the rest have black-tipped claws.

For the Dungeness Crab, the d of the claw's propodus and dactyl have a series of teeth that give that surface a sawtooth pattern. (The propodus is that segment of the claw immediately below its pincers. The dactyl is the claw's only movable pincer.) For the Slender Crab, the upper surface of each claw's propodus has only three teeth or tubercles. From my photographs, it is clear that the claws of my specimen match what is expected for Metacarcinus gracilis, so this is a Slender Crab.

Below are other observations that support this conclusion:

  • The last three joints of the walking legs (pereopods) are hairless, which is consistent with M. gracilis. On M. magister, these joints have a fringe or comb of hairs on the inner edge.
  • The walking legs are more slender and delicate than those of M. magister.
  • The last segment of the tail flap is pointed, which is true of both males and females in M. gracilis. With M. magister, females have a rounded tail flap, with males still having the pointed tail flap.

Note that the Slender Crab is also known as the Graceful Rock Crab.

Also note that this identification is tentative, as I am by no means a crab expert. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

Overall dimensions of the speciment:
1) Width of carapace at broadest point: ~6 cm
2) Length of cheliped: ~7 cm
3) Length of propodus: ~2 cm
4) Length of dactyl: ~ 1 cm

References:
1) Morris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press.
2) California Department of Fish and Wildlife (n.d.). Dungeness Crab of California and Its Close Relatives. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Dungeness-Crab#26430382-dungeness-crab
3) Jones, Ken (2012, January 2). California Crabs. Ken Jones, Writer and Pier FIsherman. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from http://kenjonesfishing.com/2012/01/california-crabs-—/
4) Cowles, Dave (2014). Metacarcinus gracilis (Dana, 1852) Schweitzer and Feldmann, 2000. Invertebrates of the Salish Sea. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Malacostraca/Eumalacostraca/Eucarida/Decapoda/Brachyura/Family_Cancridae/Cancer_gracilis.html
5) Cowles, Dave (2014). Metacarcinus magister (Dana, 1852) Schweitzer and Feldmann, 2000. Invertebrates of the Salish Sea. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://inverts.wallawalla.edu/Arthropoda/Crustacea/Malacostraca/Eumalacostraca/Eucarida/Decapoda/Brachyura/Family_Cancridae/Cancer_magister.html
6) Crabs of San Francisco Bay (n.d.). Wildlife of the San Francisco Bay Area. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://www.sfbaywildlife.info/species/crabs.htm
7) Metacarcinus gracilis (n.d.). WIkipedia. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metacarcinus_gracilis
8) Dungeness crab (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved on 9/21/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeness_crab

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Mejillón de California Mytilus californianus

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 12:17 PM PDT

Descripción

A Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia), a Black Tegula (Tegula funebralis), and some California Mussels (Mytilus californianus), photographed in a tidepool at Corcoran Beach in coastal Santa Cruz County, CA.

The Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia) is also known as the Burrowing Anemone, because it is usually found with its column buried in sand or rubble. The Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) and the Sunburst Anemone (Anthopleura sola) are usually not found with their columns buried in this way. A. artemisia is smaller than either of those species (up to 7 cm in diameter, vs. up to 30 cm for A. xanthogrammica and up to 25 cm for A. sola). It also has more slender tentacles that give the anemone a more delicate appearance. For this specimen, the tentacles are greenish brown, with numerous whitish bands; neither the bright green tentacles of A. xanthogrammica nor the variously colored green/blue/lavendar/pink tentacles of A. sola are banded.

That said, I have no prior experience with A. artemisia, so it is possible for this identification to be off. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

The Black Tegula is the rotund marine snail with the eroded, orangish apex located to the upper left of the anemone. It appears to be grazing algae from one of the California Mussels (Mytius californianus) that complete surround the anemone. Note the longitudinal ridging and relatively narrow proportions on the shells of the mussels; these features help distinguish M. californianus from other mussel species.

Overall dimensions of A. artemisia:

1) Diameter of oral disk: ~6 cm.
2) Broadest tentacle width: ~ 5 mm.
3) Longest tentatcle length: ~2.25 cm

Overall dimensions of T. funebralis:
1) Diameter at base of the tegula: ~1 cm
2) Height of the tegula: ~0.8 cm.

References:
1) Harris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press. See p. 59-60 for the species description for A. artemisia.
2) Ricketts, Edward F.; Calvin, Jaclk; & Hedgpeth, Joel W. (1985). Between Pacific Tides. Stanford University Press. See p. 330, 332 for the species description.

3) Fretwell, Kelly & Starzmoski, Brian (2013). Buried green anemone, moonglow anemone, burrowing anemone - Anthopleura artemisia. Biodiversity of the Central Coast. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://www.centralcoastbiodiversity.org/buried-green-anemone-bull-anthopleura-artemisia.html
4) Wolf, Ron (2007). Anthopleura artemisia; Moonglow Anemone. CalPhotos. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0407+3034
5) Anthopleura artemisia (n.d.). WIkipedia. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthopleura_artemisia

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 12:17 PM PDT

Descripción

A Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia), a Black Tegula (Tegula funebralis), and some California Mussels (Mytilus californianus), photographed in a tidepool at Corcoran Beach in coastal Santa Cruz County, CA.

The Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia) is also known as the Burrowing Anemone, because it is usually found with its column buried in sand or rubble. The Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) and the Sunburst Anemone (Anthopleura sola) are usually not found with their columns buried in this way. A. artemisia is smaller than either of those species (up to 7 cm in diameter, vs. up to 30 cm for A. xanthogrammica and up to 25 cm for A. sola). It also has more slender tentacles that give the anemone a more delicate appearance. For this specimen, the tentacles are greenish brown, with numerous whitish bands; neither the bright green tentacles of A. xanthogrammica nor the variously colored green/blue/lavendar/pink tentacles of A. sola are banded.

That said, I have no prior experience with A. artemisia, so it is possible for this identification to be off. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

The Black Tegula is the fairly large, black, rotund marine snail whose shell has an eroded, orangish apex; it is located to the upper left of the anemone. It appears to be grazing algae from one of the California Mussels (Mytius californianus) that completely surround the anemone. Note the mussel shells' longitudinal ridging and relatively narrow proportions, which help identify them as being M. californianus.

Overall dimensions of A. artemisia:

1) Diameter of oral disk: ~6 cm.
2) Broadest tentacle width: ~ 5 mm.
3) Longest tentatcle length: ~2.25 cm

Overall dimensions of T. funebralis:
1) Diameter at base of the tegula: ~1 cm
2) Height of the tegula: ~0.8 cm.

References:
1) Harris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press. See p. 59-60 for the species description for A. artemisia.
2) Ricketts, Edward F.; Calvin, Jaclk; & Hedgpeth, Joel W. (1985). Between Pacific Tides. Stanford University Press. See p. 330, 332 for the species description.

3) Fretwell, Kelly & Starzmoski, Brian (2013). Buried green anemone, moonglow anemone, burrowing anemone - Anthopleura artemisia. Biodiversity of the Central Coast. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://www.centralcoastbiodiversity.org/buried-green-anemone-bull-anthopleura-artemisia.html
4) Wolf, Ron (2007). Anthopleura artemisia; Moonglow Anemone. CalPhotos. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0407+3034
5) Anthopleura artemisia (n.d.). WIkipedia. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthopleura_artemisia

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2020 12:17 PM PDT

Descripción

A Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia), a Black Tegula (Tegula funebralis), and some California Mussels (Mytilus californianus), photographed in a tidepool at Corcoran Beach in coastal Santa Cruz County, CA.

The Moonglow Anemone (Anthopleura artemisia) is also known as the Burrowing Anemone, because it is usually found with its column buried in sand or rubble. The Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica) and the Sunburst Anemone (Anthopleura sola) are usually not found with their columns buried in this way. A. artemisia is smaller than either of those species (up to 7 cm in diameter, vs. up to 30 cm for A. xanthogrammica and up to 25 cm for A. sola). It also has more slender tentacles that give the anemone a more delicate appearance. For this specimen, the tentacles are greenish brown, with numerous whitish bands; neither the bright green tentacles of A. xanthogrammica nor the variously colored green/blue/lavendar/pink tentacles of A. sola are banded.

That said, I have no prior experience with A. artemisia, so it is possible for this identification to be off. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

The Black Tegula is the fairly large, black, rotund marine snail whose shell has an eroded, orangish apex; it is located to the upper left of the anemone. It appears to be grazing algae from one of the California Mussels (Mytius californianus) that completely surround the anemone. Note the mussel shells' longitudinal ridging and relatively narrow proportions on the shells, which help identify them as being M. californianus.

Overall dimensions of A. artemisia:

1) Diameter of oral disk: ~6 cm.
2) Broadest tentacle width: ~ 5 mm.
3) Longest tentatcle length: ~2.25 cm

Overall dimensions of T. funebralis:
1) Diameter at base of the tegula: ~1 cm
2) Height of the tegula: ~0.8 cm.

References:
1) Harris, Robert H.; Abbott, Donald P.; & Haderlie, Eugene C. (1980). Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press. See p. 59-60 for the species description for A. artemisia.
2) Ricketts, Edward F.; Calvin, Jaclk; & Hedgpeth, Joel W. (1985). Between Pacific Tides. Stanford University Press. See p. 330, 332 for the species description.

3) Fretwell, Kelly & Starzmoski, Brian (2013). Buried green anemone, moonglow anemone, burrowing anemone - Anthopleura artemisia. Biodiversity of the Central Coast. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://www.centralcoastbiodiversity.org/buried-green-anemone-bull-anthopleura-artemisia.html
4) Wolf, Ron (2007). Anthopleura artemisia; Moonglow Anemone. CalPhotos. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0407+3034
5) Anthopleura artemisia (n.d.). WIkipedia. Retrieved on 9/20/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthopleura_artemisia

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Julio 26, 2020 11:21 AM PDT

Descripción

The dead body of a Northern Kelp Crab (Pugettia producta), discovered in the swash zone of Gazos Creek Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. (Gazos Creek Beach is now part of Año Nuevo State Park.) The narrowly hexagonal shape of its body, with its projecting "snout," indicates that this specimen is one of the kelp crabs. The shield-like shaoe of its carapace, with its strongly alate anterio-lateral spines, is distinctive, identifying this specimen as a Northern Kelp Crab (Pugettia producta). The mottled, olive brown to dull reddish brown color of its body is typical of P. producta.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Agosto 15, 2020 02:14 PM PDT

Descripción

An Emarginate Dogwinkle (Nucella emarginata), photographed among the tidepools at Elliot Creek Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. I orignally thought that this was a Striped Dogwinkle (Nucella ostrina), but then I noticed the slight bump or thickening of the shell's parietal wall, just above the columella. N. emarginata is known to have this "parietal nub," distinguishing that species from N. ostrina, which lacks it. In N. ostrina, the parietal wall is comparatively smooth and uniform.

In forms that develop in the relatively calm water of estuaries and protected bays, N. emarginata and N. ostrina develop somewhat differing sculpture on the exterior of their shells. However, in the turbulent waters of the open coastline, where I found this specimen, the shells of both species will tend to be smooth and sometimes a bit eroded. Therefore, in this case, shell sculpture cannot be used to identify this specimen to species.

While N. ostrina is the more common species in the San Francisco Bay area, N. emarginata does occur here, as well, generally from Fort Point south.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Percebe Ganso Pollicipes polymerus

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Julio 26, 2020 09:46 AM PDT

Descripción

A Gooseneck or Leaf Barnacle (Pollicipes polymerus), photographed on some rocks at Gazos Creek Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. Gazos Creek Beach is now part of Año Nuevo State Park.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Cangrejo de Pantano Pachygrapsus crassipes

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Junio 14, 2020 10:39 AM PDT

Descripción

A Striped Shore Crab (Pachygrapsus crassipes), photographed in the upper littoral zone at Bean Hollow State Beach in San Mateo County, CA.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Julio 26, 2020 12:22 PM PDT

Descripción

A group of Sunburst Lichens (Polycauliona sp.), photographed on some rocks at Gazos Creek Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. Gazos Creek Beach is now part of Año Nuevo State Park.

These lichens are either Polycauliona candelaria or Polycauliona coralloides; at the moment, I am not sure which. They were found on the same collections of rocks as the specimen documented here: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/59861565, and they likely belong to the same species as that specimen.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Julio 26, 2020 10:59 AM PDT

Descripción

Some Shrubby Sunburst Lichen (Polycauliona candelaria), photographed on some rocks at Gazos Creek Beach in coastal San Mateo County, CA. Gazos Creek Beach is now part of Año Nuevo State Park.

Identification is tentative, based on the following observed characteristics:

1) Lichen is foliose to subfruticose in habit. In this case, it is subfruticose.

2) Thallus is yellow-orange, with "very small, divided, and ascending lobes that give it a fruticose appearance." [Sharnoff, p. 143]. These lobes are also described as being "terete," meaning that they are more or less cylindrical in shape, with some tapering at or near the tips. This charactristic gives the lichen an even more fruticose appearance.
3) The thallus typically forms a small cushion around 3 cm in diameter, although in this case, the central portion of the cushion has been lost due to the disintegration of the underlying substrate.
4) Soredia are common, appearing as small nodules along or near the margins of each lobe. Soredia are typically the same color as the rest of the thallus.
4) Apothecia are occasional, and usually possess a stipe. In this case, the central disc of each apothecium is about the same color as the thallus. The margin of the central disc area varies from being smooth and lecanorine to irregular and sorediate. Examples of both can be seen in my photographs of this specimen.
5) Pycnidia are present and generally the same color as the thallus. In my phtograph, I think the pycnidia are the tiny nodulettes that one sees scattered along the thallus' lobes.
6) Underlying substrate is rock.

Overall Dimensions:
1) Overall thallus diameter: ~ 4.5 cm
2) Apothecium diameter: 1 mm or less
3) Lobe width at broadest point: ~2 mm
4) Typical width of lobe tips: ~0.25 mm or less

Note: I do not have any prior experience with this species, so my identification could very well be off. Also note the following remarks from CNALH: " Xanthoria candelaria [an older synonym of P. candelaria] is a very variable taxon occurring on a wide variety of substrates, and it is in need of taxonomic revision throughout its distribution area." For these reasons, I consider this identification to be rather tentative. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

References:
1) Sharnoff, Stephen (2014). A Field Guide to California Lichens. Yale University Press. See p. 143 - 144 for the species description.
2) Polycauliona candelaria (L.) Frödén, Arup, & Søchting (n.d.), Consortium of North American Lichen Herbaria (CNALH). Retrieved on 9/16/20 from https://lichenportal.org/cnalh/taxa/index.php?taxon=56382
3) Xanthoria candelaria (L.) Th. Fr. (n.d.). Ways of Enlichenment. Retrieved on 6/17/20 from https://www.waysofenlichenment.net/lichens/Xanthoria%20candelaria
4) Shrubby Sunburst Lichen (Polycauliona candelaria) (n.d.). iNaturalist. Retrieved on 9/17/20 from https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/463825-Polycauliona-candelar
5) Xanthoria andelaria (L.) Th. Fr. (n.d.) Images of British Lichens. Retrieved on 9/17/20 from http://www.lichens.lastdragon.org/Xanthoria_candelaria.html
6) Xanthoria candelaria (n.d.). Common Macrolichens of the Pacific Northwest. Retrieved on 9/17/20 from https://lichens.twinferntech.net/pnw/species/Xanthoria_candelaria.shtml

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Septiembre 6, 2020 08:46 AM PDT

Descripción

Some Yellow Cobblestone Lichen (Acarospora socialis), photographed along the San Francisco Bay Trail near Point San Bruno in South San Francisco, CA. This is a fairly distinctive species, identified as A. socialis based on the following observed characteristics:

1) The lichen is crustose in habit (i.e., one cannot remove the lichen from its underlying substrate without destroying one or the other.
2) The lichen's thallus is aureolate, with angular, irregularly shaped auroles that are bright yellow in color. Aureoles vary from plane to rough, with occasional lobes or fissures. Some - but not all - apothecia also display fairly well developed (if irregularly shaped) lecanorine margins. In this case, the aureoles vary in size between 1 mm and 6 mm long.

3) The aureoles have grown together to form an irregularly shaped thallus on the surface of the underlying rocky substrate. The thallus lacks any sort of lobate margin, and it also lacks a prothallus.
4) Apothecia are common, round to angular, and immersed within the aureoles. One or more apothecia are present within each aureole. with two or more apothecia sometimes merging together. Apothecia vary in size, but are generally ~2 mm in diameter or less.
5) Central disk of apothecia are dull brown in color, plane to convex, and generally opaque.
6) Soredia and pycnidia are absent.
7) Underlying substrate is rock.

Note: Although this seems to be a fairly distinctive lichen, I have no prior experience with it, so it is possible that my identification of it is off. Suggestions and corrections are welcome!

References:
1) Sharnoff, Stephen (2014). A Field Guide to California Lichens. Yale University Press. See p. 218-219 for the species description.
2) Acarospora socialis H. Magn. (n.d.). Consortium of North American Lichen Herbaria. Retrieved on 9/15/20 from https://lichenportal.org/cnalh/taxa/index.php?taxon=Acarospora%20socialis
3) Acarospora socialis H. Magn. (n.d.). Ways of Enlichenment. Retrieved on 9/15/20 from https://www.waysofenlichenment.net/lichens/Acarospora%20socialis
4) Acarospora socialis - Yellow Cobblestone Lichen (n.d.). Texas Mushrooms. Retrieved on 9/15/20 from http://www.texasmushrooms.org/en/acarospora_socialis.htm
5) Acarospora socialis (n.d.). Wikipedia. retrieved on 9/15/20 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acarospora_socialis

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

arnel

Fecha

Febrero 1, 2020 01:46 PM PST

Descripción

Some Western Strap Lichen (Ramalina leptocarpha), photographed on an old Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) at the Madronia Cemetery in Saratoga, CA. Identified as being R. leptocarpha based onthe following observed characteristics:

1) The lichen is fruticose ("bushy") in habit.
2) The lichen's thallus consists of many flattened, grayish-green branches emanating from a single holdfast. Branchin appears to be mostly dichotmous in this case (although it can also be irregular for this species).
3) Branches are often fairly wide when compared to other species of Ramalina (e.g., up to 6mm wide), with longitudinal ridges and shallow depressions.

4) Apothecia present, flat to concave, and sometimes rather large (e.g., up to 3mm in diameter). Apothecia may or may not have a margin; if they do, this rim is the same color as the rest of the thallus.
5) Apothecia may appear on either the upper or lower surface of each "branch" of the thallus.
6) Soredia and pycnidia are absent.
7) Underlying substrate is bark.

Overall Dimensions:
1) Overall length of thallus: ~5 cm
2) Largest width of a thallus branch: ~4mm (near base)
3) Largest apothecium diameter: ~3 mm, maybe even 4 mm.

References:
1) Sharnoff, Stephen (2014). A Field Guide to California Lichens. Yale University Press. See p. 191 for the species description.
2) Ramalina leptocarpha Tuck. (n.d.). Consortium of North American Lichen Herbaria. Retrieved on 9/14/20 from https://lichenportal.org/cnalh/taxa/index.php?taxon=Ramalina+leptocarpha&formsubmit=Search+Terms
3) Ramalina leptocarpha Tuck. (n.d.). Ways of Enlichenment. Retrieved on 9/14/20 from https://www.waysofenlichenment.net/lichens/Ramalina%20leptocarpha

Fuentes:: Átomo