Diario del proyecto Metro Phoenix EcoFlora

02 de diciembre de 2021

Community Survey

Neighborhood Naturalists, we need your input!⁣ 🤓

Do you enjoy being a part of the Metro Phoenix EcoFlora? Has the project increased your appreciation of plant life or understanding of urban biodiversity? Let us know with our annual survey. We value your feedback and it will help us continue to build upon and improve the project in ways that support you best!⁣

Your answers will not only help to build and improve our local project, but also EcoFlora partner projects across the country.⁣
Survey closes December 15.

⁣Take the survey.📋

Ingresado el 02 de diciembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de diciembre de 2021

December 2021 EcoQuest: Praiseworthy Plants

Join the December EcoQuest: Praiseworthy Plants
For this EcoQuest, find and map the plants that are close to you.

For this EcoQuest, you will need to join to have your observations counted.
Join the EcoQuest

For this December EcoQuest, we’re doing things a little different. In the spirit of the holidays, we invite you to observe plants that are close to you, ones that you’re grateful for and ones that resonate with you. Observations from this EcoQuest can increase our appreciation of plants and the way they brighten our day-to-day lives.



Candelilla (Euphorbia antisyphilitica)


HOW TO OBSERVE:

  1. JOIN the EcoQuest to have your observations counted.
  2. OBSERVE plants that are close to you in your own yard or neighborhood, or plants anywhere that have meaning to you.
  3. SHARE your stories and praise with us. Tell us why the plants you chose are praiseworthy. In the Notes section of your observation (see below for help), tell us why you appreciate them or what they mean to you. Did you grow up with lavender growing in the yard? Is there a specific plant smell that is memorable to you? Did you learn more about a plant through an EcoQuest?

We will read your stories and share them on social media all month long, and they could be used in future publications for EcoFlora.

NOTE: If you would like to make observations at or near your home, but do not want to share where you live, you can set your location preference to Private or Obscured. Obscured is recommended, as it places your observation randomly in a 2-square kilometer square area. Private is also an option, but this does not allow anyone (including EcoFlora) to see the location and the observation cannot become research grade.



Southwestern Prickly Poppy (Argemone pleiacantha)

How many animal names do you know? How many plants do you know the names of? Can you name an endangered animal? Now how about an endangered plant? For many people, plants are not as charismatic or relatable as animals, and they tend to know less about them.

Plants are incredible. They can often be underappreciated and overlooked, but plants are the foundation of ecosystems. They live their own incredible lives and are capable of bewildering acts. Did you know the flowers of Watson’s Dutchman’s pipe (Aristolochia watsonii) grow to resemble a rodent ear to lure in biting flies that pollinate them? And they put off a musty smell that is said to be like a rodent. How do they even know what a rodent looks or smells like? How amazing is that? Plants provide food and habitat for animals and humans. They are the base of the food chain, provide medicine, fiber, shelter, create oxygen, absorb carbon dioxide and regulate water cycles. Their presence alone contributes to our mental and physical well-being. It’s difficult to imagine a world without them. Humans certainly couldn’t survive in such a place.


Can you see the rodent ear resemblance in shape and vein-like lines?

In the late 90s, two botanist and biology educators wrote about “plant blindness,” which refers to human’s inability to see or notice the plants in their own environment. The term plant invisibility or similar is now being used in place of plant blindness. This uses more inclusive language and does not make use of a disability metaphor. More information about this can be found here. The idea remains the same that humans have the tendency to disregard plants, even if unintentionally. Plants can blend into the background of our everyday lives, like a fire hydrant or park bench. They tend to go unnoticed until we need them or use them. Plant invisibility also includes the lack of understanding about how important plants are, for people and the planet.


Brittlebush (Encelia farinosa)

This also makes plant conservation more difficult. Plants receive far less attention in illegal wildlife trade policy and research. In 2011 plants made up 57% of the federal endangered species list in the United States but received less than 4% of federal endangered species funding. Recently, after massive poaching incidents of the Dudleya species, California approved a bill that specifically protects this species and establishes penalties for poaching. It is the first piece of legislation that deals specifically with plant poaching.


Gila County Liveforever (Dudleya saxosa ssp. collomiae)

For this EcoQuest, we encourage you to take a moment to really look at the plants around you. What can you notice? How many different plants do you see? Are there insects or animals visiting that plant? Learn their names. By taking the time to better understand and appreciate plants, we have a better idea of how the natural world is connected and how we are part of this connection. Plant conservation starts with you, right where you are. 💚


RECOMMENDED READING: In Defense of Plants: An Exploration into the Wonder of Plants by Matt Candeias. Find the book here, or read the blog here. You can also listen to the In Defense of Plants podcast.



Observations from this EcoQuest can increase plant appreciation and visibility, learn more from a social science perspective, and better understand how we are connected to urban ecosystems.

HELP WITH NOTES
When you upload your observation, type your praise or story in the Notes section.

On the website:

In the iPhone app:

In the Android app:


SOURCES AND MORE INFORMATION:

Plants People Planet: Are Humans Really Blind to Plants?

Plants People Planet: Overcoming Plant Blindness in Science, Education, and Society

USFWS: Threatened or Endangered Plants

Getting Plant Conservation Right (or Not): The Case of the United States





EcoQuests are month-long challenges that are part of the larger Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project. Learn more by visiting our website.

Look for project happenings, EcoQuest announcements and more in the newsletter, project journal and on social media.

Sign up for the newsletter, The Metro Phoenix Field Guide.

Let's be social on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Please do not observe indoor houseplants or pets.
For your own safety and the protection of plants and wildlife, do not trespass when making observations. Please follow all posted rules and guidelines in parks/preserves and do not enter private property.
Do not remove or move natural materials (plants, animals, rocks).
Respect wildlife (do not touch, feed, or disturb animals and keep a safe distance).

Observe COVID-19 Guidelines/Recommendations.
This is a great opportunity to observe and appreciate nature in our neighborhoods as we all navigate the complications of COVID-19. It is imperative that you follow COVID-19 guidelines/recommendations (wear a mask, practice physical distancing and wash your hands).

Do what’s best for you and your community.

For more COVID-19 information and guidelines, visit:
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2020/journal/31768-cnc-covid-19
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Arizona Office of Tourism: Responsible Recreation in AZ
https://tourism.az.gov/responsible-recreation-across-arizona


Ingresado el 01 de diciembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de noviembre de 2021

Save our Saguaros

The Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project recently had the honor of advising a Gold Award Project for a local Girl Scout, Ella Werre. The Save Our Saguaros project is looking at saguaro health in Metro Phoenix and the conditions that are effecting them. Ella did a fantastic job of compiling information about urban saguaros and communicating science to the public.

How can you help? Visit the website to learn more, and join the iNaturalist project to observe saguaros and make notes about their health. You can also share the brochure that Ella created.

See the website.
Join the project.
Download the brochure.

The data from this project will also help inform a future saguaro research project through Desert Botanical Garden.

Ingresado el 12 de noviembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de noviembre de 2021

November 2021 Events

🍂NOVEMBER EVENTS 🍂
As always, events and classes are FREE to attend!

ANNUAL ARIZONA BOTANY MEETING
Nov. 8, 9, 10 | 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. MST
Join the 18th Annual Arizona Botany Meeting! This year’s theme is Arizona Native Plants to the Extreme: Exploring the Botanical Diversity, Ecology, Adaptability, and Resilience of Arizona’s Native Plants. The meeting will take place virtually and bring together native plant enthusiasts from around Arizona...and the world! The Metro Phoenix EcoFlora will be presenting on Nov. 9 at 7:40 p.m. The registration fee is only $10.00 in an effort to make this an affordable event for everyone. Additional donations are welcome.
Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2021-arizona-botany-meeting-tickets-191991310177

SUNSET HIKE WITH ECOFLORA
Wednesday, Nov. 17 | 4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project member Kenzie Bell will be our guide on a casual sunset hike at South Mountain. Kenzie is an experienced REI guide, with a background in invasive plant science and management and wildlife conservation. We will be hiking the Warpaint Loop Trail, enjoying the desert and learning more about the plants around us. You will also have the opportunity to learn more about the Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project and how to use iNaturalist.
Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/204114490937

BOTANY ON BIKES
Saturday, Nov. 20 | 9 a.m. - 11 a.m.
The Metro Phoenix EcoFlora will be exploring downtown Phoenix on bikes while learning more about Chinese pistache trees (Pistacia chinensis), the focus of this month's EcoQuest. We will start and end at Margaret T. Hance Park, mainly riding along 3rd Avenue, Roosevelt Street, and Central Avenue, riding for approximately 3-5 miles. We will also be making a stop at the Roosevelt Mini Park.
Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/204166747237

Ingresado el 08 de noviembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de noviembre de 2021

November 2021 EcoQuest: Peek at Pistache

Join the November EcoQuest: Peek at Pistache
For this EcoQuest, find and map as many pistache (Pistacia spp.) trees as possible.

Join the EcoQuest
See on SEINet
See on iNaturalist

Pistache trees have been recorded in metro Phoenix since 1963. Specifically, Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis) trees are being increasingly used for street trees in the area. Observations from this EcoQuest can help us see where these trees are growing, if they have invasive potential and learn about how wildlife may be utilizing them. We can also learn more about which pistache species can be found in metro Phoenix.



Chinese pistache voucher, 1963 by Elinor Lehto.

Pistache, like, pistachio? Yep! The genus Pistacia consists of 10-20 species of trees and shrubs in the cashew family, Anacardiaceae. The species Pistacia vera is grown commercially for pistachios. Other species can produce edible nuts, have medicinal properties or can be used as ornamentals. The most common species in metro Phoenix is Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis), which is an ornamental tree and unfortunately, not edible. There are six other known species recorded in the area. How did they end up in metro Phoenix? The origin of pistache in the area isn’t clear, but the first voucher dates back to 1963 and is of P. chinensis. It was documented as cultivated on the Arizona State University campus. The popularity of Chinese pistache as a great street tree is increasing, and it can now be found all over the valley.

Chinese pistache are tolerant of drought and alkaline soil, and are hardy down to negative 20 degrees Fahrenheit. The hard wood of these trees is resistant to rot and able to withstand windy conditions. They are relatively disease and pest free and can grow 2-3 feet a year once they’re established (3-5 years). Pruning is often not necessary and the canopy provides dense shade in the summer, and filtered light in the winter when they drop their leaves. If you’re looking for fall color, something that can be hard to come by in the Phoenix area, Chinese pistache puts on a colorful display around November and December, especially certain hybrids and cultivars.


Chinese pistache photo by @judebee

These trees produce a considerable amount of fruit in clusters. These are not edible for humans, but birds and small mammals have been observed eating them. We don’t know much about wildlife and/or pollinators species that may be visiting these trees in metro Phoenix, so observations of these interactions are helpful. Birds can likely carry the seeds to new areas, but the invasive potential for Chinese pistache isn’t known. The trees need a male and female in close proximity to one another to produce viable fruit. If you see this tree or other pistache species in natural areas, send a message with your observation to ecofloraphx@dbg.org.

With increasing temperatures, frequency and severity of storms, and other climate change impacts, thinking about which plants can best handle these changing conditions is important. This is especially true in urban environments where harsh conditions can be amplified, such as urban heat island effect and nutrient depleted soils. Choosing the right plant for the right place can be tricky. Should we consider planting near-native (plants that are nearby in range and similar habitat to native plants) or introduced plants that can better tolerate these conditions, and provide ecosystem services over a longer period of time? This could be more beneficial than planting native trees that may not tolerate the conditions and pruning that urban settings demand. As an example, palo verde and mesquite trees are often pruned in ways that are not cohesive with their natural growth habits. This can lead to breaking and increased susceptibility to storm damage. Could we be mindful of the conditions that climate change is bringing while maintaining a balance of plants that support native wildlife, pollinators and people?


Chinese pistache photo by @thegardenhound

Fun Fact: Improper storage of pistachios in large quantities can spontaneously combust and start fires when stored with fibrous materials or oil-soaked fiber. The nuts have the tendency to self-heat, thanks to their high fat and low water content.


Observations from this EcoQuest can contribute population and occurrence data for pistache trees, specifically Chinese pistache, in urban settings. We can learn about species interactions for this tree, as well as possible invasive potential. We can also learn more about which species can be found in metro Phoenix and compare this to historic records.


Chinese pistache photo by @elena10

WHAT TO OBSERVE:

Common Name: Chinese Pistache
Scientific Name: (Pistacia chinensis)

See plant description here.

OTHER SPECIES TO LOOK FOR

Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia integerrima, Pistacia lentiscus, Pistacia terebinthus, Pistacia texana, Pistacia vera

See the guide: https://www.inaturalist.org/guides/14576



SOURCES AND MORE INFORMATION:

Phoenix Urban Forest

Arizona State University

Water Use It Wisely

California Rare Fruit Growers

Britannica

Transport Information Service







EcoQuests are month-long challenges that are part of the larger Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project. Learn more by visiting our website.

Look for project happenings, EcoQuest announcements and more in the newsletter, project journal and on social media.

Sign up for the newsletter, The Metro Phoenix Field Guide.

Let's be social on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Please do not observe indoor houseplants or pets.
For your own safety and the protection of plants and wildlife, do not trespass when making observations. Please follow all posted rules and guidelines in parks/preserves and do not enter private property.
Do not remove or move natural materials (plants, animals, rocks).
Respect wildlife (do not touch, feed, or disturb animals and keep a safe distance).

Observe COVID-19 Guidelines/Recommendations.
This is a great opportunity to observe and appreciate nature in our neighborhoods as we all navigate the complications of COVID-19. It is imperative that you follow COVID-19 guidelines/recommendations (wear a mask, practice physical distancing and wash your hands).

Do what’s best for you and your community.

For more COVID-19 information and guidelines, visit:
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2020/journal/31768-cnc-covid-19
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Arizona Office of Tourism: Responsible Recreation in AZ
https://tourism.az.gov/responsible-recreation-across-arizona



Ingresado el 01 de noviembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

19 de octubre de 2021

Important Observation Information

Hello all,

Whether you're new to iNaturalist and the project, or are a seasoned observer, these are great reminders for making helpful, quality observations. The main things to remember are to take clear photos that are in focus and well lit. Take multiple photos if possible, especially for plants (leaves, flowers, stems, etc.). Please do not upload multiple observations of the same organism. Meaning, if you take three photos of the same bird at the same time, you should upload those photos together as ONE observation, not three observations. For photos with multiple organisms, you can make separate observations or use the Observation Fields.

Observations made following these guidelines are easier to identify and more likely to be promoted to research grade.

Check it out! Click to see the guide in English or español.


Ingresado el 19 de octubre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

05 de octubre de 2021

October 2021 Events

🌿OCTOBER EVENTS 🌿
As always, events and classes are FREE to attend!

ECOQUESTIONS with McDOWELL SONORAN CONSERVANCY
Thursday, Oct. 14 | 3 p.m. MST
In this EcoQuestions session we hear from Mary Fastiggi, one of the Parsons Field Institute managers at the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy. Mary will discuss fountain grass and the recent removal experiments the Conservancy has been working on, as well as tentative results. Mary works to promote the Conservancy’s science mission to conduct ecological research through partnerships and citizen science to inform long-term natural resource management of the Sonoran Desert, to contribute to broader scientific knowledge, and to inspire stewardship of the desert. Join us to learn about fountain grass and possible outcomes for management from Mary.
Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/181353442027

ECOQUESTIONS: GRASS ID with LIZ MAKINGS
Thursday, Oct. 21 | 3 p.m. MST
In this EcoQuestions session we hear from Liz Makings, the Collections Manager of the Arizona State University (ASU) Herbarium. Grass identification can be notoriously difficult, and Liz is known as the go to person for grasses in our area. She co-authored A Guide to North American Grasslands and is the point person for local floristic expertise, responding to inquiries and requests from faculty, students, and the general public on a daily basis. Join us to learn the basics of grass identification with Liz!
Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/181362830107

A WALK IN THE GRASS with STEVE JONES
Saturday, Oct. 23 | 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Join us for a walk in a patch of urban habitat to learn about grasses with Steve Jones. Steve is an independent botanist in northeastern Maricopa County. He is involved in the Desert Foothills Land Trust and the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Field Institute, and has worked on documenting the flora and vegetation of the McDowell Sonoran Preserve. You may know him from iNaturalist, where he is the top identifier for the Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project!
Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/181364595387

Ingresado el 05 de octubre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de octubre de 2021

October 2021 EcoQuest: Gander at Grasses

Join the October EcoQuest: Gander at Grasses
For this EcoQuest, find and map fountain grass (Cenchrus setaceus) and native grass alternatives.

Join the EcoQuest
See the Grass Guide

Download the Fountain Grass Pamphlet
en español

Fountain grass has long been sold as an ornamental landscape grass and can be found across the country. While it is a very attractive grass species, it can spread rapidly and have problematic ecological effects, much like buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris). Observations from this EcoQuest can help us understand more about the range of fountain grass and compare it to native species.



This month’s EcoQuest is in collaboration with the Arizona Native Plant Society (AZNPS).
AZNPS is focused on promoting native plant use and conservation. Meetings, field trips and workshops provide the opportunity to build your native plant knowledge and become involved in local conservation work. AZNPS also produces Plant Press Arizona, a biannual publication that includes native plant information, research articles, book reviews, and society happenings. We have a local chapter right here in Phoenix!
Learn more, join, and/or support the Arizona Native Plant Society (AZNPS).



Fountain grass in a neighborhood wash.

People have carried plants with them to new places for ages, but sometimes this creates unintentional results. Plants are not inherently “good” or “bad.” Some just end up in a place where they can thrive and are invasive in areas they aren’t native to. Invasive plants are those that have the tendency to alter the ecosystem they live in by dominating the competition for space and resources. Fountain grass (Cenchrus setaceus) is an example of this. Native to Africa, its seeds were first available in the U.S. around 1880, and it may have been used to help reduce erosion. Records show that it was being cultivated in Tucson in the 1940s and the earliest voucher in Maricopa County dates to 1962. Fountain grass has escaped cultivation in home landscapes-thanks in large part to its easily spreading seeds. It can now be found as dense stands in washes and natural areas, where it competes with native plants, alters habitat, changes water flow and creates fuel for wildfires. There are no reported benefits of fountain grass to wildlife or pollinators. It was officially listed as an Arizona Noxious Weed in 2020 and can no longer be imported or sold in the state.
Download the Fountain Grass Pamphlet. en español.


Fountain grass voucher, 1962 by Elinor Lehto.

Consider removing fountain grass if it is planted where you live and can do so. While this is not an easy task, it is worthwhile to keep it from spreading further. Remove individual plants by digging out all of the crown tissue at the base of the stems just below the surface. This should ideally be done before the grass goes to seed. Be sure to place in a bag when disposing of it to prevent further spread and wear gloves and protective gear when removing. Do not mow! It will likely grow back from the crown.

What to do if:

• You see fountain grass where you live, but don’t own the property: try to speak with the property manager/owner to make them aware that fountain grass is invasive and see if they would be willing to remove the fountain grass.

• You see fountain grass in a neighborhood public area: provide the HOA, community manager, etc., with the fountain grass pamphlet (digital link or printed copy) and let them know that fountain grass is an invasive and a noxious weed. Ask them to consider removing it.

• You see fountain grass in a city park: contact the park manager, parks and recreation department or natural resource division to let them know where you’ve seen it. (See Sources and More Information below for contact info!)


Fountain Grass in the Superstition Wilderness.

It’s a good time of year for planting. If you choose to remove fountain grass from your own property, you can replace it with native grass that will benefit wildlife and pollinators. Yes, there are native grasses in the Sonoran Desert! Some of the most common species include three-awns or wiregrasses (Aristidia spp.), grama (Bouteloua spp.), muhly (Muhlenbergia spp.), and galleta (Hilaria spp.). These are the easiest to find plants and seeds for at local nurseries and the Desert Botanical Garden plant sale. A few non-grass alternatives include rush milkweed (Asclepias subulata), chuparosa (Justicia californica), desert spoon (Dasylirion wheeleri) and banana yucca (Yucca baccata). Replanting with purple fountain grass (Cenchrus setaceus 'Rubrum’) may not be a suitable option. This grass is reportedly sterile and does not generally form seeds, but this doesn’t guarantee it won’t. And once again, fountain grass does not benefit wildlife or pollinators like our native grasses do.


Observations from this EcoQuest can contribute population and occurrence data for fountain grass, especially in urban landscapes. This can be compared to the data for the native grasses we’re searching for. We can also learn more about the areas that fountain grass may be occupying and where it could be spreading.

WHAT TO OBSERVE:

See the Grass Guide

FOUNTAIN GRASS
Scientific Name: Cenchrus setaceus, (Pennisetum setaceum)

How to identify (from the AZNPS): Fountain Grass has a distinctive upright and graceful form with long feathery flower spikes at the end of the stems. Leaves are narrow and flat to V-shaped. Plants grow to 6 feet. The blooming spikes are 6 to 12 inches long and have purplish to bright green bristles with no visible seeds. The stems all grow from crown tissue just below the ground surface. Each year the base diameter increases, and the stems become more numerous.

Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) resembles fountain grass, but it is smaller (3-5 feet tall) with smaller flower spikes. Its leaf blades also have a more tangled appearance, making it difficult to distinguish a single plant from another.


NATIVE GRASSES

Common Name: Three-awn, wiregrass
Scientific Name: Aristida spp.


Photos by @larivera

Common Name: Grama
Scientific Name: Bouteloua spp.


Photos by @stevejones

Common Name: Muhly
Scientific Name: Muhlenbergia spp.


Photos by @stevejones

Common Name: Galleta
Scientific Name: Hilaria spp.




SOURCES AND MORE INFORMATION:
Park Contacts:
Phoenix City Parks: https://www.phoenix.gov/parks/contact-parks
Tempe: https://www.tempe.gov/government/community-services/recreation-services
Mesa: https://www.mesaparks.com/info-contact/contact-us
Scottsdale: https://www.scottsdaleaz.gov/parks
Glendale: https://www.glendaleaz.com/play/parks_and_recreation
Chandler: https://www.chandleraz.gov/explore/chandler-parks
Gilbert: https://www.gilbertaz.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation
Peoria: https://www.peoriaaz.gov/residents/parks-and-recreation
Buckeye: https://www.buckeyeaz.gov/community/residents/

Arizona Native Plant Society
National Park Service
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum
Arizona Dept. of Agriculture







EcoQuests are month-long challenges that are part of the larger Metro Phoenix EcoFlora project. Learn more by visiting our website.>

Look for project happenings, EcoQuest announcements and more in the newsletter, project journal and on social media.

Sign up for the newsletter, The Metro Phoenix Field Guide.

Let's be social on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Please do not observe indoor houseplants or pets.
For your own safety and the protection of plants and wildlife, do not trespass when making observations. Please follow all posted rules and guidelines in parks/preserves and do not enter private property.
Do not remove or move natural materials (plants, animals, rocks).
Respect wildlife (do not touch, feed, or disturb animals and keep a safe distance).

Observe COVID-19 Guidelines/Recommendations.
This is a great opportunity to observe and appreciate nature in our neighborhoods as we all navigate the complications of COVID-19. It is imperative that you follow COVID-19 guidelines/recommendations (wear a mask, practice physical distancing and wash your hands).

Do what’s best for you and your community.

For more COVID-19 information and guidelines, visit:
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2020/journal/31768-cnc-covid-19
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Arizona Office of Tourism: Responsible Recreation in AZ
https://tourism.az.gov/responsible-recreation-across-arizona



Ingresado el 01 de octubre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

23 de septiembre de 2021

Southwestern Butterfly Garden Guide

If you're interested in butterfly gardening or learning more about host and nectar plants, check out this guide by project member George Roark (@thegardenhound ). It also includes moths! You can also use this guide to learn more about the butterflies and moths we've been seeing in this month's EcoQuest: What's That Weed?

See it here: Southwestern Butterfly Garden Guide


Observation by @jaydensherwood.

Ingresado el 23 de septiembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

09 de septiembre de 2021

New Project Members

Hello all!

Quite a few new people have joined the project recently and I wanted to take the time to welcome you. Thank you for joining the project, being a community scientist and documenting urban biodiversity! We're a community science project focused on plants, and the wildlife and insects that interact with them. We host monthly EcoQuest challenges, events and trainings, and work to support local conservation efforts and understand biodiversity in metro Phoenix. You can visit our website here.

To stay up to date with EcoQuests, events, and more, we encourage you to sign up for our monthly newsletter and/or follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter @ ecofloraphx.
Click here to see the September newsletter
.

Here's a helpful guide for making great observations in iNaturalist. Observations made following these guidelines are easier to identify and more likely to be promoted to research grade. The main things to remember are to take clear photos that are in focus and well lit. Take multiple photos if possible, especially for plants (leaves, flowers, stems, etc.). Also, remember to post multiple photos of the same organism to one observation.
Check it out! Click to see the guide in English or español.


You can also earn rewards for your observations through our merit system! Check it out here.

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to message me here on iNaturalist or email me at ecofloraphx@dbg.org.

Thanks again and welcome to EcoFlora!

Jeny
Metro Phoenix EcoFlora Coordinator

Ingresado el 09 de septiembre de 2021 por jenydavis jenydavis | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario