02 de agosto de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora August EcoQuest Challenge

The August EcoQuest Challenge is MONARCHS AND MILKWEEDS

Scientists estimate that Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus) have declined by more than half since last year. From January through July, 2019, New Yorkers observed 201 Monarch Butterflies in the five boroughs. This year, only 133 have been observed (even though observations overall are up 6%). Milkweed plants (Asclepias) are the only food source for Monarch Butterfly caterpillars. How many can you find?

Ingresado el 02 de agosto de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de julio de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update July 2020

The July EcoQuest Challenge is CLIMBING THE WALLS

Save time and ensure your observations are included by selecting the project CLIMBING THE WALLS using the mobile or desktop program.

The Latin word for wall is murus, the origin of the word mural. Many plant species are able to grow on walls, particularly those adapted to lime, a common ingredient in concrete and mortar. Ferns, grasses, and even some trees are often found growing on walls. How many different species can you find climbing the walls where you live? Lichens count too!

Ingresado el 02 de julio de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de junio de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update June 2020

The June EcoQuest Challenge is MAKE THE CONNECTION

New Yorkers have documented over 370,000 plants, fungi and animals across all five boroughs of New York City and uploaded them here to iNaturalist. The program is designed to capture photos and information about individual specimens, but sometimes our photos catch insects visiting flowers.

Documenting these connections can reveal hidden life webs. These connections inform conservation efforts to protect native plants and animals.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?

Find observations with insects on flowers. Use the Observation field to record the connection. Type in “Interaction->Visited flower of”. In the drop down field, type in “Plants- Kingdom Plantae”.

Click Add to save your work.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de abril de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update April 2020

The April EcoQuest Challenge is LOOK FOR LEAF MINERS FROM HOME

Leaf Miners are insects that spend a portion of their life cycle inside a plant leaf. In their larval stages, these insects feed on the nutritious tissue between the upper and lower leaf surfaces. Their movements in search of fresh tissue are often visible through the leaf surface as distinct trails.

  1. Visit the LOOK FOR LEAF MINERS FROM HOME project page on iNaturalist. You will see thumbnail images of all 17,000 White Snakeroot observations, arranged in rows and columns.
  2. Click on one of the thumbnails to call up that observation.
  3. Look for evidence of Leaf Miner activity (distinct trails lighter in color than leaf surfaces) in each of the images for that observation. There may be many leaves that must be examined carefully.
  4. Look for the Observation Field (lower right of screen) to see if already marked. If not, start typing or select “Leaf Miner” in the box. Enter “Yes” if you see distinct Leaf Miner trails, or “No” if you can clearly see the leaves but do not see any Leaf Miner trails. If you are not sure whether you see any Leaf Miner trails, or the images are too blurry, or there are no leaves visible, select “Unclear.” Be sure to click “Add” to save your annotation.
  5. Review these observations, observations for examples of positive or “Yes” evidence of Leaf Miners.
  6. Review these observations, observations for “No” evidence of Leaf Miner.
  7. Review this observation for “Unclear.”
  8. If the observation has already been marked with a Leaf Miner annotation, skip it and go to another.

WHAT IS THE GOAL?
Help NYBG document occurrences of Leaf Miner insects on White Snakeroot plants in New York City by April 30. Your efforts will help conserve native plants and animals in New York City.

Ingresado el 01 de abril de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de marzo de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update, March 2020

The March EcoQuest Challenge is FIND MORE LESSER CELANDINE

Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna) is an invasive plant spreading rapidly throughout southeastern New York, including New York City. It invades pristine natural areas and forms a monoculture that crowds out native species such as Violets (Viola spp.) and Carolina Spring-Beauty (Claytonia caroliniana). Your observations will help us document the extent and density of Lesser Celandine in New York City. Get more information on Lesser Celandine here and follow the progress on the Lesser Celandine Project Page

If you are in the Hudson Valley, your Lesser Celandine observations will contribute to the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management March EcoQuest

Ingresado el 03 de marzo de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de febrero de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update, February 2020

The February EcoQuest Challenge is CAN YOU FIND EUONYMUS?

Euonymus are small trees, shrubs and woody vines in the Staff-Tree family (Celastraceae). Indigenous and introduced species in our range typically have sharply angled (and sometimes winged) stems; opposite leaves that are evergreen or deciduous; and brightly colored fruit. Burning Bush, Euonymus alatus, is an aggressive invader with conspicuously winged stems.

Ingresado el 03 de febrero de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

03 de enero de 2020

NYBG EcoFlora Update, January 2020

January's EcoQuest Challenge is MAKE THE GRADE 2019. The objective is to get as many 2019 observation to research grade as possible. Join us Wednesday, January 8, at 2:30 pm for an iNaturalist workshop on how to find observations, sort and refine your searches and how observations are processed once they are identified. Space is limited to twenty. Sign up here.

Ingresado el 03 de enero de 2020 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de diciembre de 2019

NYBG EcoFlora Update December, 2019

Decembers's EcoQuest Challenge is HUNT FOR HOLLY, focused on the Holly genus (Ilex). See the Guide to the Hollies of New York City.

Here is a little Holly Day mashup to get you in the mood to find Hollies.

Toys in ev'ry store
But the prettiest sight to see
Is the holly that will be
On your own front door

And when you walk down the street
Say hello to friends you know
And everyone you meet

Ingresado el 01 de diciembre de 2019 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de noviembre de 2019

NYBG EcoFlora Update, November 2019

November's EcoQuest Challenge is DANGEROUS DUO, focused on two of the most destructive invasive plants in our region.

Last month, seventy-five New Yorkers made 749 observations of four species of Sumac (Rhus). Those landscapes blessed with a grove of Sumacs were ablaze with fall color. The Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) were on fire this year. Wow. What a show. Why would anyone plant the invasive Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus) when they could plant a native like Smooth Sumac? Hopefully we will see more and more of these plants left to flourish on their own and deliberately planted for their easy care, stunning fall displays and wildlife value.

Ingresado el 01 de noviembre de 2019 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de octubre de 2019

NYBG EcoFlora Update, October 2019

October's EcoQuest Challenge is SEEK SUMAC.

Over 150 New Yorkers observed nearly 2,000 Goldenrods last month. We found fifteen of the previously recorded nineteen species, including one new for the City and two that where thought to be historical. The two historical species were both found in the Bronx (Solidago ulmifolia and Solidago arguta). On Staten Island, Zihao Wang found Solidago puberula, a species never before recorded for New York City. There are now twenty Goldenrods documented from NYC; two are historical (Solidago aestivalis, Solidago latissimifolia) and one is rare (Solidago uliginosa).

Ingresado el 02 de octubre de 2019 por danielatha danielatha | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario