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Field Journal 6

Date - April 18, 2021
Start time - 9:55am
End time - 11:40am
Location - Intervale trails in Burlinton, VT
Weather - overcast and 48 degrees with no wind.
Habitat(s) - Deciduous forest, flood plain/river, agricultural

Some great sightings today - Ornitherapy indeed!

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por gthiggins gthiggins | 14 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Garden weeds

Cleavers (sticky) - 5 leaves, in potager

Probable weeds:
bellflower or (fake) boneset
snakeroot
avens
clover

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por maxelope maxelope | 5 observaciones
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4-17- 2021 10:20am to 11:40am

4-17- 2021 10:20am to 11:40am

Found a beetle and a wolf spider, and another beetle while moving more logs and rocks while volunteering on-site at the SHFF.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por parkershaw parkershaw | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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4-15-2021 9:00am to 11:00am

4-15-2021 9:00am to 11:00am

I found 2 new spiders, and I think I found an oriental cockroach while moving logs and rocks. while making observations on the site at the SHFF.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por parkershaw parkershaw | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Delicate Fern Moss Journal

The weather and condition of the lake on April 1st:
On April 1st, it was around 45 degrees Fahrenheit. There was a light breeze and cold weather. Due to a storm a few days prior, there were many fallen trees, branches, and leaves. Due to all the fallen trees, the route to the lake was different, and it was also easier to get to places around the lake that we hadn’t previously taken pictures of or observed. Additionally, the storm washed up a significant amount of noticeable trash onto the shores of the lake. All around the coast, there were beer cans, plastic containers, and even an inflatable raft that had washed up as well.

Delicate Fern Moss:
In the Aldridge Lake area, the Delicate Fern Moss were much more prevalent, both when around the Eastern Skunk Cabbage and not. When it was around the Eastern Skunk Cabbage, the Delicate Fern Moss was primarily closer to the lake and the water, in areas with plenty of groundwater, surrounded by fallen leaves and branches, due to the strong wind and the recent storm.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por minhac minhac | 1 observación
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Eastern Teaberry Journal

The weather and condition of the lake on April 1st:
On April 1st, it was around 45 degrees Fahrenheit. There was a light breeze and cold weather. Due to a storm a few days prior, there were many fallen trees, branches, and leaves. Due to all the fallen trees, the route to the lake was different, and it was also easier to get to places around the lake that we hadn’t previously taken pictures of or observed. Additionally, the storm washed up a significant amount of noticeable trash onto the shores of the lake. All around the coast, there were beer cans, plastic containers, and even an inflatable raft that had washed up as well.

Eastern Teaberry:
The Eastern Teaberry or American Wintergreen rested closer to the ground, similar to the other species, among the fallen leaves and branches from recent storms. They stretched out from a red-stained stem, and a few had berries still on their branches. Their leaves were oval-shaped and longer when compared to the similar-looking Partridge berry leaves.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por minhac minhac | 1 observación
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Partridgeberry Journal

The weather and condition of the lake on April 1st:
On April 1st, it was around 45 degrees Fahrenheit. There was a light breeze and cold weather. Due to a storm a few days prior, there were many fallen trees, branches, and leaves. Due to all the fallen trees, the route to the lake was different, and it was also easier to get to places around the lake that we hadn’t previously taken pictures of or observed. Additionally, the storm washed up a significant amount of noticeable trash onto the shores of the lake. All around the coast, there were beer cans, plastic containers, and even an inflatable raft that had washed up as well.

Partridgeberry:
At first glance, the Partridgeberry looked like an extension of the Eastern Teaberry. It had similar features, such as red berries and small green leaves that rested closer to the ground. However, the Partridgeberry leaves were much differently shaped compared to the Eastern Teaberry. The Eastern Teaberry leaves are longer and more oval-shaped, while the Partridgeberry leaves are much rounder and almost heart-shaped. They were surrounded by many fallen leaves and branches, due to the strong wind and the recent storm and were protruding from the ground.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por minhac minhac | 1 observación | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Fan Clubmoss Journal

The weather and condition of the lake on April 1st:
On April 1st, it was around 45 degrees Fahrenheit. There was a light breeze and cold weather. Due to a storm a few days prior, there were many fallen trees, branches, and leaves. Due to all the fallen trees, the route to the lake was different, and it was also easier to get to places around the lake that we hadn’t previously taken pictures of or observed. Additionally, the storm washed up a significant amount of noticeable trash onto the shores of the lake. All around the coast, there were beer cans, plastic containers, and even an inflatable raft that had washed up as well.

Fan Clubmoss:
In the Aldridge Lake area, the Fan Clubmoss grew closer to the ground and there were many noticeable Fan Clubmoss all around the area. They were surrounded by many fallen leaves and branches, as well as a few leaves growing from the ground that we were unable to identify.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por minhac minhac | 1 observación
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Eastern Skunk Cabbage Journal

The weather and condition of the lake on April 1st:
On April 1st, it was around 45 degrees Fahrenheit. There was a light breeze and cold weather. Due to a storm a few days prior, there were many fallen trees, branches, and leaves. Due to all the fallen trees, the route to the lake was different, and it was also easier to get to places around the lake that we hadn’t previously taken pictures of or observed. Additionally, the storm washed up a significant amount of noticeable trash onto the shores of the lake. All around the coast, there were beer cans, plastic containers, and even an inflatable raft that had washed up as well.

Eastern Skunk Cabbage:
In the Aldridge Lake area, the Eastern Skunk Cabbages were very prevalent; we were able to capture evidence of quite a few at different locations and stages of their life. The Eastern Skunk Cabbage primarily was closer to the lake and the water, making sense because it thrives in areas with abundant water. It was surrounded by a Delicate Fern Moss, fallen leaves, and branches due to the strong wind and the recent storm. The Eastern Skunk Cabbage emitted a strong odor.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por minhac minhac | 1 observación
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FJ6

Date: 4/17/2021
Start time: 7:20 am
End time: 10:00 am
Location: Saxon Hill Recreation Area
Weather: ~40º F, no wind or precipitation
Habitat: mixed deciduous and coniferous forest

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por gracey4 gracey4 | 8 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Interested in prizes?

Hi CNC Partner Posse! @patrickkelly907 (of Stokes Nature Center fame) was offering to bake a loaf of bread as incentive for our friendly partner posse competition. Anyone interested in donating some fun, but simple prizes too? What should our prize categories be? Comment below to discuss!

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por elleneiriksson elleneiriksson | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Get ready Utah! The 2021 City Nature Challenge is almost here!

Nature is all around us in Northern Utah – and we need your help photographing it from April 30-May 3, during The 2021 City Nature Challenge! This annual international effort encourages people to find and photograph their nearby plants and wildlife using iNaturalist. All observations are recorded in our local project, but also contribute to the global bioblitz, with over 350 participating cities. We call our "city" The Wasatch (a combination of Box Elder, Cache, Davis, Salt Lake, Summit, Utah, Wasatch, and Weber Counties), and we need your help to highlight Utah's nature on a global scale by finding as many wild plants and animals as you can within these 8 Utah counties.

2021 marks the 5th year Utah is taking part in the City Nature Challenge, and last year was our most successful turnout to-date (over 6,500 observations!), nearly double our record, and a 170% increase in nature observers - that's you! We're looking to break last year's record, but we can't do with without you! How will you take part this year? Will you revisit a walk you did in 2020? Record as much nature as you can in your yard or neighborhood? Will you hop on one of our many partner bioblitz events?

How to take part:
-take photos of the wild living things (or evidence of the wild living things) you find in Box Elder, Cache, Davis, Salt Lake, Summit, Wasatch, Weber and Utah counties from April 30-May 3
-Add them to iNaturalist, and they will automatically count towards CNC: The Wasatch
-Get the word out to your friends and family!
-Join the 2021 City Nature Challenge: The Wasatch project for updates.

Looking for a local event, ways to connect, or fun resources for educators, families, or anyone interested in this year's City Nature Challenge? Visit The Natural History Museum of Utah's CNC webpage for more info: https://nhmu.utah.edu/citizen-science/challenge

City Nature Challenge 2021 important dates:
-Make nature observations on iNaturalist: April 30 - May 3
-All remaining observations uploaded to iNaturalist and identified: May 4 - May 9
-International results announced: May 10
-More info on the 2021 CNC in Utah: https://nhmu.utah.edu/challenge

Interested in a little competition?
We're making this year's challenge a friendly competition between participating Utah counties (Box Elder, Cache, Davis, Salt Lake, Summit, Wasatch, Weber and Utah). Who can find the most nature? With your help, it could be your county!

We can't wait to see what you find this year!
-NHMU Citizen Science (@nhmucitsci) & The Wasatch organizing partners: Hutchings Museum, Jordan River Commission, Ogden Nature Center, Red Butte Garden, Salt Lake City Library, Salt Lake County Library, Stokes Nature Center, Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter, Thanksgiving Point, The Nature Conservancy in Utah, Tracy Aviary, TreeUtah, US Fish & Wildlife Service - Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, Utah’s Hogle Zoo, Utah Society for Environmental Education, Utah Open Lands, Utah Valley University.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por nhmucitsci nhmucitsci | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field Journal 6: Field Observation

Date: 4/17/2021
Start: 1:35
End: 2:05
Location: Around downtown Burlington (starting at Hungerford Terr, to the north then west then south
Weather: cloudy, scattered showers throughout the day, halfway through walk it got sunny and stayed sunny throughout the rest of the walk
Habitat: residential areas with patches of trees and some front lawn grass patches

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por avilensky avilensky | 12 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field Journal 6

Date: April 17, 2021
Time: 9:00 - 10:30
Location: Centennial Woods, Burlington VT
Weather: Overcast, post-heavy rain
Habitat: Mixed deciduous and conifer forest patch near urban development

Towards the middle of Centennial Woods we came across a Winter Wren hopping among rocks and logs near the stream. I wondered why it was spending so much time on the ground, chirping and bobbing. I found on AllAboutBirds.org that Winter Wrens usually nest between ground level and twenty-three feet off that ground, and also may hop along the ground to look for food in dead logs or upturned roots. They are also more commonly found in mixed deciduous/conifer forest areas near streams. If that isn't the most apt description.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por bfchurch bfchurch | 15 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Weekly statistics between April 11, 2021 and April 17, 2021

This week 218 observers made 1280 observations between Sunday, April 11, 2021 to Saturday, April 17, 2021. Among the top five observers, @jmgconsult observed 101 examples of life in the Anacostia watershed; @ronwertz contributed 83; @stephen220 contributed 80; @dbarber contributed 79; and @carrieseltzer and @dtread1 each contributed 77. Rounding out the top observers, @epic2112 contributed 48; @dossification contributed 41; @lauriedkr contributed 36; @hholbrook contributed 32; and @kristin-marie contributed 27. 111 people contributed one observation, 32 people contributed two observations, and 8 people contributed 3 observations. Plants stayed in first place (722 observations), followed by Birds (178 observations), and Insects (149 observations). Protozoa had the fewest observations, with just two. Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) had four observations.

A few highlights of observations are provided below, to celebrate the wide variety of life found in the Anacostia watershed.
@jorbogmont Mummichog https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73952705
@dtread1 American Bullfrog https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73731587
@ronwertz Eastern Red-backed Salamander https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73897578
@jmgconsult Wolf Spiders https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74181902
@jimdella Barred Owl https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73861890
@stephen220 Black-crowned Night-Heron https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74187052
@stephen220 Broad-winged Hawk https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74208001
@lauriedkr Eastern Bluebird https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73665550
@dtread1 Osprey https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74334047
@ronwertz Red-breasted Merganser https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74106242
@stephen220 Yellow Palm Warbler https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73907075
@stephen220 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73786725
@carrieseltzer Asian Shaggy Digger Bee https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73709049
@cbloomfi Duskywings https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74060756
@carrieseltzer Eastern Tailed-Blue https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73709059
@vwiest Gray Hairstreak https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74278327
@treegrow Little Black Caddisflies https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74205554
@ronwertz Spring Beauty Miner https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74107918
@thefloorisflava Two-lined Leatherwing https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74330903
@adamwillis Virginia Opossum https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73930314
@ronwertz Jack-in-the-pulpit https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74107930
@christine143 Common Five-lined Skink https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/73628085
@m4ebull Eastern Garter Snake https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/74047736

Observations this week, by Taxon:
Actinopterygii 4
Amphibia 31
Animalia 16
Arachnida 16
Aves 178
Fungi 44
Insecta 149
Mammalia 13
Mollusca 7
Plantae 722
Protozoa 2
Reptilia 63
(blank) 35

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por jmgconsult jmgconsult | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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11 days, Ferndale 14PA00 and Ticks

Ferndale 14PA00 is located in the RM of Macdonald. The La Salle River flows from the northwest to southeast through the northern part of the square. The square is divided by mile road grids and drainage ditches. Agriculture dominates the land use in this square.

At the time of posting, 5 observations of 4 species had been uploaded by 3 observers. The survey for the Breeding Bird Atlas of Manitoba confirmed 5 bird species nesting here, with another 44 species probable or possible. Here's the full list.

Manitoba has two tick species that we should all be able to identify accurately: American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) which we know here as the wood tick and Eastern Black-legged Tick (Ixodes scapularis) which we sometimes call the deer tick. The wood tick is more commonly seen and its bites can be very annoying. The much smaller deer tick is a known vector of several tick borne diseases including Lyme disease.

Wood ticks...

Black-Legged ticks...

There is now a national project to report ticks - eTick. It also has a mobile app for use when you are out and about. At the time of posting, most of the observations are from the eastern part of Canada - a situation reflecting more the location of eTick users rather than the locations of ticks. Manitoba has recently joined the the project as a partner.

Mary Kennedy (@mkkennedy ) has set up a project called Ticks in the Maritimes Her journal posts there give details for adding tick observations to both iNaturalist and to eTick. She encourages us all to support the eTick project - by entering data to the eTick project as well as with data entered in iNaturalist. eTick has created a helpful video demonstrating exactly how to take a photograph of a tick with a smart phone. There is interest in images of ticks from anywhere in Canada taken at any point.

Links

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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The impala has a peculiarly versatile tail

It has long been realised that the impala (Aepyceros melampus) is something of a 'living fossil', unrelated to other antelopes. However, what seems to have been overlooked is the odd versatility of the tail in particular.

The impala normally hides its tail, tucking the tassel between the legs more than occurs in other ungulates including the superficially similar gazelles and blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra). This is consistent with the peculiar striped pattern on the posterior of the haunches, which helps to make the whole animal inconspicuous in the sense of disruptive colouration (roughly equivalent to camouflage). Many ungulates have boldly-marked hindquarters, conspicuous from a distance, and many others have plain hindquarters which blend into the surroundings, but the impala is unusual in blending into the surroundings by means of hindquarters marked similarly to the stripes of the tiger (Panthera tigris). The habitual hiding of the white tail-tassel makes sense in this context.

The impala does frequently display its tail in certain behaviours, but in doing so reveals the caudal anatomy to be unlike that in any other bovid or deer. Firstly, the long white hairs are erected either laterally (as in masculine displays in which the tail looks like a white fan) or vertically (as when the tail is flicked up synchronously with the kicking of the hind legs in kick-stotting). Secondly, it is the ventral surface of the tail on which the vertical pilo-erection occurs - unlike the tails of various antelopes, including gazelles, on which any vertically-arranged tomahawk-like hairs (usually black) are in the dorsal side.

The impala also shows the white tail-tassel when shooing insects and when passing urine or faeces, but in these cases there is no erection of the hairs in either of the orientations described above.

Surprisingly, the length of the tail-tassel is different in the two main subspecies of the impala. Many species of ungulates show subspecific variation in various features, but it is rare for the tails to vary much within a given species. In the black-faced impala (Aepyceros melampus petersi) the tail is so large that it possesses an additional curve in its shape as seen in kick-stotting. When tucked between the legs, the tail-tip reaches as far as the prepuce, instead of merely the scrotum.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por milewski milewski | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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City Nature Challenge in -2 Weeks!

Hey there community science superheroes! Our project is full of beautiful photos and creative discoveries. Thank you all so much for your dedication, observations, and love of nature!

🦎Now it's time to get ready for the City Nature Challenge 2021: do what we do best, and do it a lot! Represent LA County wildlife in this international bioblitz by joining the LA County City Nature Challenge Project here:
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2021-los-angeles-county

🌿TURN YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY INTO COMMUNITY SCIENTISTS:
Get them on iNaturalist and on Team Nature for All and the LA County City Nature Challenge projects.
Keep it simple and send them the step by step available on the Team Nature for All Website here:
https://lanatureforall.org/citynaturechallenge

Suggestion: make a day of it! Go out and take iNaturalist for a test run. Help them with their first observation! Take photos and send them over to organizer (samitayag@gmail.com) to be featured. Remember to follow 'Rona precautions, stay safe, and have fun!

🔎Don't forget to check out the Team Nature for All website for upcoming awesome events. Join us for our May 4th celebration with surprises, guest speakers, good company and great stories! It wouldn't be a celebration without you!
https://lanatureforall.org/citynaturechallenge/#EVENTSCNC

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por song-dog song-dog | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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166-Amazon AWS CLI Open Data Metafiles in een database inlezen

Getting the iNaturalist AWS Open Data metadata files and working with them in a database

  1. Ophalen metadata files vanaf Amazon AWS (metCommand Line Interface)
  2. Selecteren Data in SQLite database (using DB Browser)
  3. Work with the data in a SpatiaLite database (using QGIS and DB Browser)

Open DataSet met Taxonomie gegevens

As you may have heard, iNaturalist officially launched its “iNaturalist Licensed Observation Images” open dataset on AWS on 15 April 2021. Most of the dataset consists of CC-licensed and non-copyrighted images from observations in iNaturalist, but there are also 4 metadata files that go along with these image files which provide additional information about the photos, associated observations, associated observers, and iNaturalist’s taxonomy.
https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/getting-the-inaturalist-aws-open-data-metadata-files-and-working-with-them-in-a-database/22135
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=tiny+world

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por ahospers ahospers | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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YESBioBlitz

We just created our first BioBlitz, and we would like to invite as many observers to join us May 1-3, 2021. You can register for the event on Yellow Point Ecological Society's (YES) website to be entered to win one of four great field identification guides.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por yellowpoint_ecological_society yellowpoint_ecological_society | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Welcome to the 2021 City Nature Challenge!

And- thank you for joining Team WNC!

This year we're competing with 4 other regions in North Carolina for bragging rights on who can find the most biodiversity, contribute the most observations, and recruit the most observers. While friendly competition is great, the real goal here is to work collectively to document the most observations of organisms across our mountains, our state, and the world. Thank you for participating in this worthy effort.

Your help in documenting biodiversity is appreciated. We are offering a chance to earn a NC BioBlitz badge by attending a free online course I'll be presenting via The North Carolina Arboretum. Anyone who attends the class, adds 40 observations during the City Nature Challenge anywhere in N.C., and adds an identification to 10 other observations contributed to the CNC will receive this patch. Follow this link to register.: https://4020a.blackbaudhosting.com/4020a/AE21-Intro-to-City-Nature-Challenge--iNaturalist

To add to the fun, we'll be giving a Naturalist Prize Package to the top three observers of this project in the categories of Most Observations and Most Species. I'll reach out to the winners on May 10.

In an effort to document as much species richness as possible, it will be helpful if a variety of elevations, habitats and geography of our region is represented. I invite you to contribute to this Google Spreadsheet that I have created to share information about where members of this project are making observations. Participation is entirely voluntary, but I welcome your contributions! To access this document follow this link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VY1soFSmMzqjL5g_x-YriiSrkMwVs0RmxwHhPrI9YKw/edit?usp=sharing

Have fun, stay safe, and thanks for contributing to our understanding of the biodiversity of our mountains!

Jonathan Marchal
on iNaturalist: jmarchal

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por jmarchal jmarchal | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Phylogenetic Tree and Evolution

The 5 species that I wanted to look at are: Genus Arctium, Genus Ranunculus, Genus Hedera, Genus Acer, and Genus Quercus. Making the phylogenetic tree for these species, I initially grouped the species based on whether they had stems or trunks which is often indicative of their size as well. Both Genus Arctium and Genus Ranunculus have stems and are flowers, while Genus Acer and Genus Quercus have trunks as they are trees. The only outlier in this situation is Genus Hedera which has stems but is not a flower since their leaf resembled more of that of the trees. So, I think that Genus Hedera and the trees had a more recent common ancestor compared to that of the flowers.

When looking at the characteristics of these plants, the trunk of the trees and the stem of plants have the same function since it protects the xylem and phloem. The purpose of the xylem is to transfer water and nutrients collected by the roots to other parts of the plant, while the phloem transports the sugar made by the leaves to the rest of the plant. Since they serve the same function, in a sense the trunk of a tree is larger stem of a plant with a harder outer shell that protects it. By having that outer layer, also prevents unnecessary water loss and predators from killing the trees by damaging the trunk. Trees also have more and bigger leaves than flowering plants because it needs more energy since it is bigger than flowers, so it requires more energy to perform the same function as a smaller plant. Genus Hedera has the stem of flowers but the leaves of trees because they can leech material off bigger plants by growing their roots behind the trunks of trees and use the material that is supposed to be for the tree to allow itself to grow. By having a trunk instead of a stem, it would make the Genus Hedera less effective at stealing resources from a host since it is unable to maneuver around the hard bark. Moreover, they tend to grow upwards on surfaces that they can attach to and can grow to cover a significant area covering sunlight and preventing photosynthesis from happening in the plants that they are covering.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por steven740 steven740
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The changeable life of Lance-leaf Greenbrier.

The greenbriers (Smilax) are infamously variable, but one species has what almost seems like a "larval" and "adult" form. Lance-leaf Greenbrier, Smilax smallii, grows primarily in woods. As a young plant (or what I assume is a young plant), it grows like a ground-cover low on the surface, with leaves designed to capture the minimal light that penetrates to the ground: large leaf surface, wide thin blades, and light color. I believe during its young years on the ground, it's storing up a large underground tuber. When the tuber reaches sufficient size, Smilax smallii sends up an amazing thick shoot that grows straight up, leafless but armed with prickles, toward the canopy. Once it encounters a branch it latches on with tendrils and then makes its way to the outer surface of the canopy, where it grows a dense covering of small, leathery, dark leaves, designed for high exposure.

One trail that I frequent has a large amount of Smilax smallii at ground level and in the canopy. Some canopy plants were recently felled in Hurricane Zeta. I took this opportunity to make observations to show the morphological variation.

(1) Ground-level S. smallii (large, triangular, variegated leaves with wavy margins; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68238364).

(2) Canopy-level (smaller, dark, lanceolate leaves, densely spaced; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68238366).

(3) The relatively rare intermediate low-climbing form (mid-size, slightly variegated, intermediate shape leaves; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68238365).

(4) Here is one of the spectacular "reachers" growing straight up from ground to canopy (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/41900217).

(5) And here is an example of the massive underground tuber that Smilax smallii stores as it grows (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/51459612)

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2021 por janetwright janetwright | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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April 16th, 2021

Time: 2-3:30pm
Weather: Fully overcast, constant rain. 10 mph winds from the North.
Place: Centennial Woods (Fully forested, denseish forest), and some suburban landscape (Hospital/Jeffords area), residential areas.

Birds:
2 Northern Cardinals
2 Brown Creeper
2 Barred Owls
2 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Winter Wren
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 American Robin
2 Song Sparrow
6 Ring-billed Gull

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por jridge1821 jridge1821 | 9 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field journal 6

Field journal 6: Field Observation
April 11, 2021
Start time: 1:02
End time: 2:35
Location: Morse Farm, Montpelier, VT
Weather: 72 degrees F, 40% cloud cover, SSE wind at 0 mph
Habitats: Old growth forest, sparse small areas of water and muddy ground.

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por acshiers acshiers | 20 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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¡El Biomaratón CNC 2021 ha llegado!

Faltan 12 días para el inicio del Biomaratón CNC 2021, recuerda que participar en los de Otoño e Invierno tenían como finalidad practicar para llegar en forma al Biomaratón internacional, para participar con más de 400 ciudades de todo el mundo, de más de 40 países.

Recuerda pasar por los proyectos de España y Colmenar Viejo para unirte en los proyectos, no es obligatorio para participar, pero así os llegarán los mensajes que incluiremos en el diario.
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/biomaraton-cnc-espana-2021
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/biomaraton-cnc-2021-colmenar-viejo

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por eduardoramirez-anapri eduardoramirez-anapri | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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New Species added to the Endemics List

Thank you to @the-catfinch for directing me to an endemic species list I had previously missed, courtesy of the Burke Herbarium: http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/waflora/checklist.php?Category=Endemic
I have updated the project accordingly.

Species added to the project:
Lomatium knokei
Lomatium tamanitchii
Tauschia stricklandii
Cirsium edule var. wenatchense
Symphyotrichum × Columbianum (hybrid)
Hackelia taylorii
Oreocarya leucophaea
Oreocarya thompsonii
Sabulina basaltica
Sabulina sororia
Sedum rupicola
Astragalus kentrophyta var. douglasii
Astragalus speirocarpus
Agastache occidentalis
Neoholmgrenia hilgardii
Delphinium lineapetalum
Rubus nigerrimus
Allium dictuon
Camassia quamash ssp. azurea
Calamagrostis tacomensis

Species added to iNat as a whole:
Lomatium lithosolamans
Elmera racemosa var. puberulenta

Outside of plants, I have also removed Hemphillia burringtoni, Keeled Jumping-slug, from the list as, despite some sources, it does also appear to be found in parts of Oregon.

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por masonmaron masonmaron | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field Journal

I went out around 2:00 pm on April 14, 2021. I saw these tadpoles swimming around in large numbers at a pond. They were very small, about a centimeter in length and black. They mostly swam in groups on the shallow end of the pond, near the bank. I had walked around the pond, but only saw these tadpoles in one area of the pond. I saw two main groups, about a meter from each other. I noticed that the sand color they were staying in was a lighter color, compared to the darker sand in other parts of the pond. The tadpoles mainly stayed near the bank and did not go too far out. They used their tails to propel themselves around, much like a flagellum. They also seem to be quite sensitive to their environment, as they quickly swam away the first time I peered into the water. I tried to be more discreet the next time so they would not skirt away. While I am not completely sure how the adult toads/frog will look like when it is fully grown, I have seen Cane Toads around the area, so it is possible these tadpoles are Cane Toads.

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por notabiologist notabiologist | 1 observación | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field Journal

I went out around 2:00 pm on April 14th, 2021. I saw these plants growing in the pond. There is only one area of the pond that had plants growing. This plant grew in patches, there were about 2-3 bigger patches. I saw that a lot of the leaves were dried or had holes in them. Perhaps the poor quality of the water, or the very hot weather contributed to the yellowing leaves. I know most plants that grow on the water in large patches with large leaves typically flower. However, I could not see any flowers at this time. This could have been due to the season or that the plant was not in a very healthy condition. The leaves were about 6 inches in length, and had stems extending in all different directions.

Ingresado el 17 de abril de 2021 por notabiologist notabiologist | 1 observación | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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