Angie Zhou Journal Entry

An unique adaptation for one for one of my observations on coneflower is its prickly seed head. This discourages animals as the seeds appears to cause danger to them. The plant develops this adaptation to prevent the seeds to be eaten by animals such as birds.

One adaptation that all of my observations have in common is the variations in coloration. The most common colors are pink and bright yellow, which mostly serve to attract insects for pollination and seed dispersal.

The phylogeny placement for one of my observations that I researched on panicled hydrangeas (Hydrangea Paniculata). It is on the Hydrangea genus, in the family Hydrangeaceae, order Cornales. It is a deciduous shrub growing in sparse forests or thickets in valleys or on mountain slopes.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por angie_zzq angie_zzq | 1 comentario | Deja un comentario

Blue Spruce

The blue spruce belongs to the Kingdom Plantea, Subkingdom Streptophyta (land plant) Division Tracheophyta (vascular plant), Subdivision Spermatophytina (seed plant), genus Picea, Species pungens.

Specific observation: Blue spruces have needle like leaves as opposed to broad ones. Needles loose less water and have less wind resistance making the tree less likely to fall over in storms.

General observations: Most if not all the plants had green leaves reflecting the universal presence of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is the light-absorbing pigment allowing plants to absorb light energy to power carbon fixation.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por reisagilfix reisagilfix | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Blue Spruce

The blue spruce belongs to the Kingdom Plantea, Subkingdom Streptophyta (land plant), Division Tracheophyta (vascular plant), Subdivision Spermatophytina (seed plant), genus Picea, Species pungens.

Specific observation: Blue spruces have needle like leaves as opposed to broad ones. Needles loose less water and have less wind resistance making the tree less likely to fall over in storms.

General observations: Most if not all the plants had green leaves reflecting the universal presence of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is the light-absorbing pigment allowing plants to absorb light energy to power carbon fixation.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por reisagilfix reisagilfix | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Mahi Kandage Journal Entry, Angiosperms native to Westford, MA

The phylogeny placement of the American Aster falls most closely within the Daisy family. Its most recent ancestors include the Smallhead, Purplestern, and Douglas asters. The Daisy family resides within a larger category of Eudicots, a subsect of flowering and seed plants.

The angiosperms in my observations all share a common adaptation crucial to their survival. All of these plants flower. Flowering, though also beautiful to look at, has a more important purpose: to help plants seed and reproduce. The flowering plants and their nectar invite insects and other animals to pollinate and help them reproduce.

The Dwarf dandelion, as pictured in one of my observations, has a unique adaptation to help it reproduce. The yellow dandelion flower transitions into the signature grey fluff. This fluff enables the dandelions seeds to be carried easily by the wind, enabling its reproduction without the help of an insect.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por mahikandage mahikandage | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Journal Entry for Lab 2

The species I chose for the unique adaptation was the bull thistle. Its unique adaptation are the spines surrounding the flower of the bull weed which are used to protect it from hungry animals.

One adaptation that all my observations had in common, minus the groundhog, was the colour of all the plants. Plants developed to be primarily green in colour to best absorb red wavelength light which they mostly use to grow.

I would place all the plants in the tracheophyte phylogeny since they all have a vascular system. The groundhog I would place in the marmota phylogeny since it is one of 14 marmots within that phylogeny.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por adam-mk adam-mk | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2- Journal Post

The phylogenetic placement of the Sugar Maple is as follows: it branches from Eukaryotes to Plants, to Green plants, to Land plants, to Vascular plants, to Seeded plants, to Flowering plants and then Eudicots. Next, we can see the order is Sapindae, that Sugar Maples are part of the Soapberry family and the Acer genus. The last common ancestor of Sugar Maples is the Canyon Maple.

One common adaptation among all the trees I observed is stomata, which help regulate water loss during extreme temperatures.

An adaptation unique to the pine genus that I observed was that it has long and thin needles, so it has fewer stomata. This means it has even less of an ability to lose water during the cold Montreal winters.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por sophierc123 sophierc123 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2 Journal Entry: "Adaptations and Phylogenetic Placement" - Drea Garcia

On September 15th, there was a BIOL111 Bioblitz event, during which we were tasked with finding 10 different organisms (each) that related to our topic of choice; seeing as how we chose to analyze how insects interact with plants in their environment, we selected these as the primary subjects of our observations. The Bombus impatiens, known as the Common Eastern Bumble Bee, has an adaptation uncommon to various other insects: hair. Seeing as these bees are native to North America, it was necessary for them to develop protection from the cold, harsh winters; their adaptation of hair around their bodies is well-suited for the climate.

Though many of the organisms observed differed from each other (arachnids vs. hymenopteras, etc), they all had a common adaptation: several legs/appendages. Their numerous appendages allow for an increased range of locomotion, as well as better balance when landing on differing surfaces.

Below is my phylogenetic placement for the Common Eastern Bumble Bees I observed at Jeanne-Mance Park, near Mont Royal:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Anthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Apidae
Genus: Bombus
Species: Bombus impatiens

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por dreachip dreachip | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2 Journal

On September 14, I went on a hunt for different types of leaves and I was glad to find some unique adaptations. Firstly, most leaves during this time of the year in Canada are green in colour. This is a unique adaptation of many leaves that dates way back, since leaves produce chlorophyll (their own food) with the help of photosynthesis, and chlorophyll gives the leaves their green pigment. In a specific group of leaves I found, an adaptation is for them to produce poison/toxins. These leaves were determined to be eastern poison ivy by going through a dichotomous key and suggestions from iNaturalist. Lastly, again through a dichotomous key, I was able to determine the phylogeny of one of the types of leaves I've found. I was able to find the species level of the goldenrods I spotted: solidago canadensis var. canadensis. All 10 observation photos (including the poison ivy and goldenrods) are included in this journal entry,

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por whateva17 whateva17 | 10 observaciones

Spring BioBlitz Results (Week 3)


Results for the third week of the Spring BioBlitz Series below. Each series continues this Friday, Saturday and Sunday with the following events:


After School BioBlitz Series - 21AS4 Event - Friday 24th September, 3pm - 11pm. What can you discover on a Friday afternoon and evening.
Micro BioBlitz Series - 21M4 Event - Saturday 25th Sept, 12pm - 1pm. Again, you've got 60min to discover as much as you can.
Buzz & Crawl BioBlitz Series - Harmonia Event - Sunday 26th Sept. The first of the Buzz & Crawl BioBlitz Series. How many Invertebrates can you find in one Spring day.


Third in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event brought in a total 162 observations covering 79 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.


Third in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event brought in a total 129 observations covering 77 species from 14 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.


First in the Fathom BioBlitz series this Spring, the Tosia Event brought in 16 observations covering 12 species from 3 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21AS3 Event Results


Third in the After School Series this Spring, the 21AS3 Event brought in a total 141 observations covering 85 species from 24 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21AS3 Event Results


Third in the After School Series this Spring, the 21AS3 Event brought in a total 141 observations covering 85 species from 24 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event Results


Third in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event brought in a total 162 observations covering 79 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event Results


Third in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M3 Event (11am - 12pm) Event brought in a total 162 observations covering 79 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Tosia Event Results


First in the series this Spring, the Tosia Event brought in 16 observations covering 12 species from 3 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Tosia Event Results


First in the series this Spring, the Tosia Event brought in 16 observations covering 12 species from 3 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Journal entry 1 - Lea Hajj Moussa

One of my ten observations was a chicory flower, it was one of the two flowers I had observed but it was the only flower with brightly coloured (purple) petals. This adaptation suggests that the chicory flower I observed is a pollinating ground for pollinators as the bright petals are bound to attract them.

All of my observations were plants on the ground/very near to the ground. This means that all the plants I observed rely heavily on their roots to ensure they receive the nutrients and water from the soil. They all have root hair cells that absorb water by osmosis and mineral ions by active transport into the plants.

I chose to look into the phylogenetic tree of the Red Shank on OneZoom. This plant is part of the Adenostoma genus and the A. Sparsifolium species. It is best found on north facing slopes at about 4000 ft of elevation.

Ingresado el 22 de septiembre de 2021 por leahajjmoussa leahajjmoussa | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Mushroom Learning Resources

I created a list of resources to help folks interested in learning more about Fungi. It's not exhaustive, just a starting guide. Small PDF, click to open:

Mushroom Resources

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por culland culland | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Journal Entry: iNaturalist Bioblitz ~ Alicia Bontes

Parthenocissus quinquefolia, frequently regarded as the Virginia creeper, is a species of flowering vine located beneath the clade of angiosperms in the Plantae kingdom. As denoted at the bottom of the scientific classification pyramid, the species name for the Virginia creeper is P.quinquefolia, while the genus name is the Parthenocissus, indicating that the Virginia creeper is a climbing plant and can form seeds without pollination. Above the genus classification, the Virginia creeper is listed as being a part of the grape family, Vitaceae, for the small, greenish flowers it produces in inconspicuous clusters in late spring subsequently maturing in the late summer season into small, hard, purplish-black berries as depicted in the observation. To add to this, there are no distinct similarities in terms of the adaptations that all observed species in the group project have in common. This is merely because there is a broad range of species identified, each with a unique set of adaptations that differ from the rest. Not to mention, there are very few older plants in the observed sample. Traditionally, older plants, for example, a large maple tree, bear more adaptations than younger plants, for example, a garden weed, as they have undergone a diverse array of environmental conditions through which their genetic composition changed to better allow for survival and reproduction. That being said, a general adaptation that most of the observable species have in common is serrated leaves. General research suggests that serrated leaves bring in more energy and maximize the plants’ growth rate compared to smooth leaves as the teeth have better transpiration and photosynthesis early in the growing season while the leaves are initially blossoming (Nix 2021). Furthermore, the adaptations for an individual organism are more straightforward and quick to differentiate as compared to the complex group of organisms noted in the observational listings for the project. One such species that has undergone adaptations to its surrounding environment is the Robinia pseudoacacia, a medium-sized hardwood deciduous tree, belonging to the legume family. Compared to other plants in the area that were inherently small, the black locust was considerably taller and projected further outward, extending its leaves and branches toward the sunlight in between the gaps of other plants. In order to receive enough sunlight and nutrients to further conduct the process of photosynthesis and respiration, the Robinia pseudoacacia had to grow taller and further outward, bypassing the other plants in the area. Not to mention, the black locust was relatively large, or ‘full,’ and looked very healthy, remaining untouched by other organisms. As a physiological adaptation or response to the environment and its predators, the black locust is toxic and poisonous which prevents other organisms from eating too much of it or destroying it, thereby promoting its full growth. Thus, it is clear that the black locust underwent the process of mutation to adapt to its surrounding environment and be more suitable for long-term survival.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por aliciabontes aliciabontes | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Taller sobre anfibios-Gran Biobusqueda del Sur 2021

Entre el 21 y el 25 de octubre, Argentina participará de la "Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur 2021", una iniciativa de ciencia ciudadana organizada a nivel nacional por el Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" y la Fundación Vida Silvestre Argentina, que se llevará a cabo en varios países alrededor del mundo, desde la línea del Ecuador hasta el Polo Sur. El evento consistirá en registrar observaciones de naturaleza mediante la plataforma iNaturalist, cuyo nodo nacional es ArgentiNat.org.

Más info: https://www.argentinat.org/posts/55909-gran-biobusqueda-del-sur-2021

En septiembre y octubre se realizaran diversos talleres para quienes participen en la Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur 2021, con el fin de obtener las mejores observaciones de naturaleza.

Un equipo de lujo, para que todos/as puedan conocer más sobre los taxones y la mejor forma de poder registrar observaciones.

Los/as esperamos el martes 19/10 a las 18 horas de la mano de @naty2, integrante de SAVE THE FROGS! Buenos Aires.

Para saber mas sobre los otros talleres ingresá al siguiente link: https://www.argentinat.org/blog/56624-talleres-gran-biobusqueda-del-sur-2021

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por buenosaires17 buenosaires17 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Journal Entry Lab 2

One unique adaptation of the Genus Philodromus is the fact that they have long legs, which allows them to more easily pursue their prey. Interestingly enough, the leg II is longer than the others, for what reason, I do not know. Because I did both insects and plants, I do not think that there is an adaptation that all species will have in common so I will state to different ones. For the insects, I noted that they are all towards the darker color, even if they have slight highlights in other colors. I wonder if that is because we were viewing these animals somewhat in the forest. For the plants, a similarity between them all is the fact that they all have a better reproduction rate because of their use of pollen. A phylogeny placement that I found was for the Eastern Hornet Fly, which stems from the Hornet family.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por logan330 logan330 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Estação AEBenfica - Lisboa (Rede de Estações de Borboletas Nocturnas)

Moth capture and observation sessions at night for students, parents and teachers at the Agrupamento de Escolas de Benfica
https://www.reborboletasn.org/esta%C3%A7%C3%A3o-aebenfica

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por maremimar maremimar | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2 Journal Entry :)

My plant of choice is the white snakeroot, also known as Ageratina altissima. This flowering plant is a poisonous perennial herb that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It's native to eastern and central North America.
White snakeroot contains the toxin tremetol responsible for the poisoning often referred to as "milk sickness". This is because the plant is often consumed by cows, poisoning their milk and meat, making their consumers ill. Toxicity is an adaptation that protects a plant from predators, increasing its chance of survival and resultantly its chances of reproduction.
An adaptation that all my observations have in common is the use of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is the chemical that makes it possible for energy from sunlight to be useful for plants. It allows them to store the energy and use it to photosynthesize.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por ladybugfriend13 ladybugfriend13 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Leatisha Ramloll - Leaves

  1. American Ginseng
    One unique adaptation for the American Ginseng is that it grows close to trees. This is because it needs the shade of the tree in order to survive since direct sunlight is harmful to it. As an additional bonus, the tree drops leaves which decay and create mulch allowing the plant to thrive.

  2. Common adaptation
    One adaptation that all observations have in common is that they are adapted to the harsh winters of the Montreal climate. For example, maple trees in the area will drop their leaves in order to conserve energy during harsh and cold winters.

  3. Black walnut- phylogeny placement
    The black walnut (scientifically referred to as Juglans Nigra) is part of the Dicotyledon class (plant/angiosperm that has a pair of leaves or cotyledon in the embryo of the seed) and the Juglandaceae (walnut) family.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por leatisharamloll leatisharamloll | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Salvador Babinet - Mont Royal Plants Journal Entry

Phylogeny: The Norway Maple is in Kingdom: Plantae, Clade: Tracheophytes, Clade: Angiosperms, Clade: Eudicots, Clade: Rosids, Order: Sapindales, Family: Sapindaceae, Genus: Acer, Section: Platanoidea, Species: A. platanoides.

Unique adaptation: The Norway Maple has adapted so its roots grow near the soil surface. This lets it gather more nutrients and outcompete neighboring plants with their roots further down.

General adaptation: I noticed that many of the plants I observed had their leaves growing high up. This probably helps them get more sunlight, especially when many plants in an area are competing for the sunlight in that area.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por sjbabinet sjbabinet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Nicholas (weeds on Mount Royal, yarrow)

Yarrows (Achillea millefolium) are common weeds from the Asteraceae family. They typically grow in temperate regions in North America, and inhabit the phylogenetic tree of the Genus Achillea. One unique adaptation of yarrows is their thick stem cuticle and vast root system which allows them to grow in poor soil, low in nutrients.

An adaptation of most weeds is that they have extreme fire and drought resistance, which allows them to persevere in rough areas that are free of competitors.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por nicholasmckinley nicholasmckinley | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Anna Beyea - Plants of Mt Royal

  1. Sensitive fern (Onoclea sensibilis)
    The sensitive fern is a part of the Onclea genus, a sub division of the polypodiophyta division in the Plantae Kingdom.
    In order to find this species on OneZoom, the pathway taken was that of the Eukaryotes, which specified into plants, then into land plants and eventually leading to ferns. This species is found in the phylogenic branch derived from the Onocleaceae family which includes the common ancestors Onclea orientalis, Shuttlecock fern and Sensitive fern.

  2. As a result of the particularly cold winter climate of Canada, all of the species observed have adapted in order to survive through cold weather and winter freeze. Sensitive ferns adapt by covering itself in fronds throughout the winter whereas species such as the woodsorrel overwinter to keep their population abundant.
  3. Sensitive fern
    Sensitive ferns, unlike some northern ferns, are not evergreen. This species dies in the winter, but continues to have an abundant population in cold climates due to adaptations which allows for the plant to reproduce. This plant produces fronds which proceed to overwinter before allowing the release of spores (a form of asexual reproduction) in the spring, leading to the continuous presence of the plant in colder climates.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por annabeyea annabeyea | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2 journal entry

I chose to look at the phylogeny for the Eastern Grey Squirrel, or the Sciurus carolinensis. It is apart of genus Sciurus, the family sciuridae, in the order Rodentia, and is a part of the Mammalia class. An adaptation that is very beneficial to the Eastern Grey Squirrels lifestyle is the anatomy of their back legs. They can rotate their back feet, allowing them to climb down trees head first. This adaptation assists in avoiding predation, reaching food, and easy travel between trees. Eastern Grey Squirrels are also equipped with especially good memories that are helpful in finding the food stashes that they hideaway for the winter time. Since most of my other observations were apart of the phylum arthropoda, while the Eastern Grey Squirrel is apart of the phylum chordata it proves difficulty in finding an adaptation that most if not all have in common. However, it can be said that from observing all of the species that I did they share the adaptation of camouflage. That is they are more or less blend into their habitual environment, to such a degree that often times I had trouble capturing them on camera or even finding them. The adaptation of camouflage can be extremely helpful in avoiding predation and even tricking prey into believing they are safe. 2 species that can be observed to actually have evolved from the Sciurus carolinensis on its phylogenetic tree are the Sciurus aberti and the Sciurus griseus.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por cocoeinarsen cocoeinarsen | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Rowan Sekulich's Journal Entry:

The species I picked was the White Ash, whose scientific name is Fraxinus americana. It is part of the olive family and the ash genus. 106 species share the same scientific name "Fraxinus".

I could not find an identifiable adaptation that all the observed species have in common. I believe that this is because I didn't limit my search to a narrower type of plant (eg. shrubs, trees). Depending on certain factors such as size and specific environmental needs, different plants will adapt differently to their surroundings.

One adaptation seen on the white ash (as well as other deciduous trees) is how the tree cuts off water and nutrients to the leaves during autumn, in order for them to fall off before winter. This helps the tree survive the cold winters in this part of the world.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por rowansekulich rowansekulich | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Elaine Xiao's Lab 2 Journal

I chose to do the eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). They are native to eastern North America and are a large pine. It is also called the “Tree of Peace” or the “Weymouth Pine”. It is from the plantae kingdom, tracheophytes clad, pinophyta division, pinopsida class, pinales order, pinaceae family, pinus genus, p. subg. Strobus subgenus, p. sect. Quinquefolia section, p. subsect. Strobus subsection, and is the P. strobus species.

A general adaptation for all my observations is the thickness of the bark. I noticed most of my observations had large trunks and very thick barks to protect them through the cold winters of Montreal. These barks also help them adapt to the weather changes throughout the year.

The eastern white pine has a lateral root system that grows downwards. This adaptation is called sinker roots, and is different from the typical tap root. The sinker roots allow the system to have more surface area which allows the tree to take in more water for the rest of the plant.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por elainexiao elainexiao | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Iris - Green plant journal entry - phylogeny/adaptation

Phylogeny placement: Spruce
A spruce is a tree of the genus Picea in the family Pinacea. They are native to North America and the northern hemisphere. They can be identified by their needles which have four sides, and are mainly found in the taiga biome.

One unique adaptation of pineapple-weed:
Something unique about pineapple-weed is that it’s edible. According to the website 'edible wild food', both the leaves and flowers of pineapple weed are edible. Pineapple-weed has been used in salads and to make herbal tea as well.

One thing they have in common:
All of my observations are green plants. Green plants have the ability to make their own food by undergoing a process called photosynthesis where a green pigment called chlorophyll is used. Most of the green plants absorb sunlight and convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose to make their own “food”.

Ingresado el 21 de septiembre de 2021 por irisliu irisliu | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Más