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Winter

We may have short days and a few frosty nights but we don't have arctic style Winters here. It's rare to have snow last for more than a few days and last year 2018/9 we have no snow at all below 800metres.
However it does feel cold in the breezes, with wind-chills to minus 7°C - nothing to fear nor brag about.
I have not spent much time in iNat because I am loyal to iSpot but I am beginning to appreciate the interchanges here, in Nat, after a cool reception and a, generally, cold start.
I do find the whole interface here easy and more user-friendly than Spot, so may be inclined to share more in this place

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por dejaym dejaym | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Upcoming presentations on iNaturalist and the CNC

Do you live in the Valley? Are you interested in iNaturalist and the 2020 City Nature Challenge? If so, join Dave Ireland at the Acadia University Biology Seminar on Thursday, November 21st at 11:30, or at the NSSC Centre for Geographic Sciences at noon on Friday, November 22nd. Dave will be sharing stories from last years CNC and inviting folks in the Valley to join the 2020 event.

For more information about the seminar at Acadia check their Facebook posting: https://www.facebook.com/events/419095282097431/?active_tab=about

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por mkkennedy mkkennedy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Cape Breton joins the international City Nature Challenge!

In 2019 the Halifax area was registered in the international City Nature Challenge (CNC, http://citynaturechallenge.org/). HRM participated with 160 cities from around the world.

Although the weather was miserable – it was held following Earth Day (the last weekend in April) – many people came out to participate and the HRM group almost beat Chicago! Calgary was also participating – their excuse for HRM beating them was that they had a dumping of snow that weekend.

The local CNC objectives were simple. We wished to encourage people of all ages, residents and visitors, to get outdoors; to explore; to observe nature; share observations; and to have fun!

This year several other areas around the Maritimes have joined HRM in signing up to participate. CBRM is one of these areas.

The CNC2020 event isn’t until April but now is the time for us to get organized and to spread the word. As experienced iNatters who have recorded observations from the Sydney area (aka CBRM), we would encourage you to join this project (City Nature Challenge 2020: Cape Breton Regional Municipality (CBRM). Any observation collected within the defined area during the dates of the event (April 24 – 27) will automatically be added. By joining the project, you will receive notifications if/when news items are posted to the project page.

If you have any questions, concerns, or ideas related to this event please contact cnc2019HRM@gmail.com

Mary Kennedy (I may live in Dartmouth but my roots are in Cape Breton)

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por mkkennedy mkkennedy | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Reserva Ecológica Ciudad Universitaria 15-11-19

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por ezequielvera ezequielvera | 19 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Reserva Ribera Norte 17-11-19

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por ezequielvera ezequielvera | 39 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Birds of the Garamba Complex

A short report on the birds of the Garamba complex was drafted and is available on cloudbirders or on this link: https://www.cloudbirders.com/be/download?filename=D%27HAEN_DRCongo_0905_20162019.pdf
The report is an overview of all the birding done by myself between 26 Sep 2016 and 30 May 2019 and covers 307 species.

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por mathiasdhaen mathiasdhaen | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Bird Watch at Ansim Wetlands, Daegu (대구 안심습지 탐조)

I went to Ansim Wetlands to watch 2 Eurasian Otters being released back into the wild. It was an event by the NIE(국립생태원) to release two otters that had been rescued last year. Seeing a group of waterbirds in the wetlands, I decided to take a quick look.

18 Nov 2019, 13:20~15:20
Weather: Cloudy with strong winds

Gadwall 알락오리
Falcated Duck 청머리오리
Eurasian Wigeon 홍머리오리
Mallard 청둥오리
Eastern Spot-billed Duck 흰뺨검둥오리
Common Pochard 흰죽지
Little Grebe 논병아리
Grey Heron 왜가리
Great Egret 중대백로
Eurasian Coot 물닭
Oriental Turtle Dove 멧비둘기
Oriental Magpie 까치
Large-billed Crow 큰부리까마귀
Japanese Tit 박새
Brown-eared Bulbul 직박구리

15 species total

There were probably more passerine birds but didn't have the time to take a closer look

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por sanalbert sanalbert | 3 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Фотоатлас Птицы Новороссийска © Торгачкин Игорь Петрович

Представляю свой авторский фотоатлас "Птицы Новороссийска © Торгачкин Игорь Петрович". 
В него вошло порядка 225 видов птиц, в основном околоводных, сфотографированных мною в городе-герое Новороссийске и его окрестностях. Хочу особо отметить, что я не орнитолог, не биолог, не фотограф дикой природы и тем более не член каких бы то ни было природоохранных обществ, просто любитель Природы с фотоаппаратом в руках.
Фотоатлас Птицы Новороссийска © Торгачкин Игорь Петрович
http://www.torgachkin.ru/p/birdsnovorossiysk.html

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por torgachkin torgachkin | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Thank you

While many Albany residents see Western Ringtail Possums (WRP) regularly in their gardens and sadly on the sides of our road, but don’t know how endangered these critters are and why/if they are surviving here. Since 2016 Oyster Harbour Catchment group has facilitated possum surveys with the help of local volunteers on the Albany mounts and suburbs of Emu Point and Bayonet Head to try to gain a greater understanding and improve local awareness.

Increasing information and awareness is particularly important for the WRP as its critically endangered under State legislation (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950). It has been estimated that the remaining population size in the wild is less than 8,000 mature individuals, with a decreasing trend1. The Recent research predicts there is a 92% likelihood that they will be extinct within 20 years2 if action to protect populations and their habitat isn’t enacted immediately.

Despite growing fears that this south west endemic species could be wiped out. The project’s possum consultant, Sandra Gilfillan, said there seemed to currently be a healthy breeding population in Albany. Together with the help of Department of Biodiversity, Conservations and Attractions (DBCA), Sarah Comer, a comprehensive report investigating the exact abundance, habitat and distribution in Albany. Which is accessible to all on the Oyster Harbour Catchment group website alongside some practical guides for individuals to help conserve this species by making their backyards possum friendly and participate in the citizen science actions.

Luckily for the species Albany has become a stronghold with a healthy, breeding population discovered both on the backyard cameras and during the spotlighting walks with an average of 4 each night. One night a whopping 15 possums were found in a single winter night. Although some females with young were seen on the mounts, they were more often observed on the backyard cameras indicating they are more commonly breeding in backyards. This is particularly encouraging for the local citizen science program on inaturalist app (www.inaturalist.org/places/australia) showing that the population is adapting to urban areas.

This project has kick started research into this population but there is still much to do. If you think you have a possum in your backyard or see them on a walk, please take a photo and upload it to the inaturalist app (www.inaturalist.org) It will even identify the species if you’re not sure. Even dead possums need reporting to the DBCA and remember to check the pouches checked for young.

This project has been supported by funding from the Western Australian Government's State Natural Resource Management Program. There were many other people that helped, from our partners: City of Albany, DBCA, and the University of Western Australia. The South Coast Ringtail Possum Working Group oversaw the project and provided valuable advice and guidance. Stewart Ford and Roy Teal from Biota for support with distance analysis. The many dedicated volunteers and community groups including the Aboriginal Green Army team that were part of our on-ground actions and communications.

1. Woinarski J.C.Z; Burbidge A.A. and Harrison P.L. (2014). The 2012 action plan for Australian mammals. CSIRO publishing.
2. Yokochi, K. (2015). A major road and artificial waterway are barriers to the rapidly declining Western Ringtail Possum. School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia.

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por ohcgcommunications ohcgcommunications | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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A Southern Elephant Seal Duel - Observation of the Week, 11/17/19

Our Observation of the Week is this pair of dueling Southern Elephant Seals, seen in the French Southern Territories by @admss

A bird enthusiast, Adrien Mauss visited the Kerguelen Islands, in the far southern Indian Ocean, in 2013. “I was lucky to spend some months [there],” Adrien tells me, and he is currently iNat’s top observer for the French Southern Territories with 89 verifiable observations. 

Elephant seals spend a majority of the year at sea hunting squid, fish, and other prey (diving to depths of over 2,000 meters!), but mate and pup on land. Males generally return before females do, and “they begin to fight for the control of a ‘harem’ of females, containing sometimes more than 20 of them,” explains Adrien.

This picture shows a typical fight. They face each other and attack with their sharp teeth, mostly around the neck. The fight finishes when one of them abdicates and runs away from the group of females. During that season, due the fights most of the males are wounded, but rarely badly. They all wear a lot of scars around the neck, and some damage to the nose [note: photo may be disturbing].

Females give birth on land and nurse their pups for just over three weeks, not eating for this entire time. The pups grow from about 40 kg (88 lbs) and triple that weight before weaning. Adrien tells me “except for their fights, elephant seals have a really peaceful life on the ground, where they have no predators and spend most of the time sleeping, snoring and dreaming.” 

“As far as I'm concerned, I'm just a nature enthusiast,” says Adrien (above, watching seabirds on the Kerguelen coast). “I've not been using INat for a long time, unlike other databases. 

But I like the way it works here, helping newbies to identify flora or fauna, and everybody is a beginner for some place of the world and/or for some genus. I like the discussions around ID and the “democratic” approach of identification with all the good and the bad that can bring...I've been birding in France and Europe for 20 years and I have a good knowledge of European birds, not much about everything else so I benefit from the skills of others here!

- by Tony Iwane. Some quotes have been lightly edited for clarity and flow.


- Here’s a classic clip of David Attenborough getting too close to a male Southern Elephant Seal.

- By the end of its nursing period, a female elephant seal’s milk is about 50% fat!

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por tiwane tiwane | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Berry Springs Preserve Herps of Texas report, 16Nov2019

The monthly amphibian monitoring at Berry Springs Park and Preserve carried on as usual during the Good Water Master Naturalist chapter's picnic, and because of this concurrent activity we had a number of new folks join us. I stopped counting at 19, and there were at least three little guys enjoying the adventure with the big kids. Unfortunately, no frogs or toads were seen or heard (there had been a freeze for the last six consecutive mornings, so we couldn't blame them for not being active), but the middle slough springhead was flowing again (after being dry for the last two months), bats were heard on the bat detector after dark, and we all had a nice walk.
The monitoring period was 17:35 - 18:35.
Participants were Kathy, Christie, Jim, Keri, Lynne & Walter, Helen (welcome !), Mike, Diane, Bekki, Krystal, Randy & Sandra, Thomas & Binnur (welcome !), Mary Gail (welcome !), and Lisa & Kayden & William (welcome !).
Environmental conditions at the middle slough springhead at sunset:
- Air temperature = 50.9 deg F
- Water temperature = 60 deg F
- Sky = No/few clouds
- Water level = Average (at the main pond)
- Relative humidity = 35 %

Ingresado el 18 de noviembre de 2019 por k_mccormack k_mccormack | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Wintu Audubon Society Presents “California Birds in a Changing Climate.”

National Audubon has determined that 50% of birds will be threatened by the climate crisis within the current human lifetime. As our climate changes, the entire web of life must adapt or perish. If a flower blooms earlier due to increased temperatures, insects that depend on that flower must hatch earlier, and birds that consume those insects must arrive from their spring migration earlier. How much life’s web and the birds that are part of it will be able to adapt to this change is uncertain.

https://anewscafe.com/2019/11/16/redding/wintu-audubon-society-presents-california-birds-in-a-changing-climate/

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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First live observation of Swamp Rabbit Confirmed!

The Nature tracking project finally got something more than trace evidence of Sylvilagus aquaticus, or Swamp Rabbit. The species of greatest conservation need ,(Williamson, Co) that we set our sights on.

This past week was productive by placing a video camera on a previously confirmed trace evidence Latrine Log. During the week two live observations occurred of the log being used and one observation was backed up by another camera.
11/10/19 thru 11/16/19
These cameras will be left in place one more week before being re-tasked.

In addition to this, very fresh scat samples were collected for future DNA analysis.

The bigger challenge will be to determine beyond genus all the observations of cottontail rabbits we continue to see. The black and white images make it difficult to say one way or another.
There is a game camera that will produce color images at night, however it uses white flash technology which the animals can see and be spooked by. I'm not opposed to briefly deploying this to learn the identity. Undoubtedly the animals have experienced lightning and would probably associate a few flashes with that.

My feelings are that if we decide to use a visible night time flash then I am inclined to finish up a project I have been building for a while and that is a DSLR camera trap that I only need to complete the trigger mechanism. I have been building this for the past year in an attempt at a quality photo of a Ringtail.

Hopefully there will be more good news soon!

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por mikef451 mikef451 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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black bear seen in New York State

once me and my family travels to the white mountains of New York State that night we saw a mother bear and 3 cubs, they ran to quick for us to get a picture but it was my first time seeing a black-bear,

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por moose-11 moose-11 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Two people just got the plague in China — yes, the Black Death plague By Jessie Yeung, CNN Updated 8:43 AM ET, Thu November 14, 2019

(CNN)Two people in China are being treated for plague, authorities said Tuesday. It's the second time the disease, the same one that caused the Black Death, one of the deadliest pandemics in human history, has been detected in the region -- in May, a Mongolian couple died from bubonic plague after eating the raw kidney of a marmot, a local folk health remedy.

The two recent patients, from the Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, were diagnosed with pneumonic plague by doctors in the Chinese capital Beijing, according to state media Xinhua. They are now receiving treatment in Beijing's Chaoyang District, and authorities have implemented preventative control measures.
Why is bubonic plague still a thing?
Why is bubonic plague still a thing?
Plague, caused by bacteria and transmitted through flea bites and infected animals, can develop in three different forms. Bubonic plague causes swollen lymph nodes, while septicemic plague infects the blood and pneumonic plague infects the lungs
.Pneumonic -- the kind the Chinese patients have -- is more virulent and damaging. Left untreated, it is always fatal, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).
During the Middle Ages, plague outbreaks devastated Europe, killing around 50 million people. Since then, we've invented antibiotics, which can treat most infections if they are caught early enough -- but the plague isn't gone. In fact, it's made a recent comeback.
Plague-infected prairie dogs have shut down parts of a Denver suburb
Plague-infected prairie dogs have shut down parts of a Denver suburb
From 2010 to 2015, more than 3,248 cases were reported worldwide, including 584 deaths, according to the WHO. The three most endemic countries are the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar, and Peru.
In the United States, there have been anywhere from a few to a few dozen cases of plague every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2015, two people in Colorado died from the plague, and the year before there were eight reported cases in the state.

Having caused close to 50,000 human cases during the past 20 years, the plague is now categorized by WHO as a re-emerging disease.
How do you get plague? Is it curable?
According to the CDC, people usually get plague after being bitten by a rodent flea carrying the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Infected animals like cats and dogs can also infect their owners.
The bacteria persists because low levels circulate among populations of certain rodents, the CDC says. These infected animals and their fleas serve as long-term reservoirs for the bacteria.
A 2018 study suggested it's not just rats that are responsible -- the Black Death may have spread by human fleas and body lice.
Black Death spread by humans, vindicating rats
Black Death spread by humans, vindicating rats
There is currently no effective vaccine against plague, but modern antibiotics can prevent complications and death if given quickly enough. However, a strain of bubonic plague with high-level resistance to the antibiotic streptomycin, which is usually the first-line treatment, was seen recently in Madagascar.
Untreated bubonic plague can turn into pneumonic plague, which causes rapidly developing pneumonia, after bacteria spreads to the lungs.
A recent report suggests that researchers are exploring a variety of approaches to develop an effective vaccine. Since different vaccine designs lead to different mechanisms of immunity, the authors conclude that combinations of different types might overcome the limitations of individual vaccines and effectively prevent a plague outbreak.
How do you protect yourself from plague?
Key steps for prevention of plague include eliminating nesting places for rodents around your home, sheds, garages and recreation areas by removing brush, rock piles, trash and excess firewood, according to the CDC.
Report sick or dead animals to law enforcement or your local health officials, do not pick up or touch them yourself. If you absolutely must handle a sick or dead animal, wear gloves.
Use insect repellent that contains DEET to prevent flea bites and treat dogs and cats for fleas regularly. Do not sleep with your pets as this increases your risk of getting plague. Finally, your pets should not hunt or roam rodent habitats, such as prairie dog colonies.

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por walkingstick2 walkingstick2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Chilly Trout fishing 11/16/2019

I sprung out of bed at 4:40AM yesterday morning to get ready for the day. I had gathered all my gear which included an old Eagle Claw fly rod and my backpack that holds my fly gear. I hadn't been fly fishing since early July so my excitement level was high. My friend Alex showed up around 5:30AM, we talked for a while about what we thought the day might hold and what the fishing would be like. Then we went and met up with our friend Josh who also hadn't fished in a while. The first creek we fished was awful, as far as I know there are only Brown trout in it that are stocked every year. It was muddy and full of snags. After losing a few flies and only seeing one fish we changed spots.

The second spot is a place most people would overlook because it is quite small and a popular swimming hole in the summer. Believe it or not there's wild rainbows in there that sit in the slack water outside the little falls. Even though it was cramped we made it work. Alex caught two fish on a zebra midge #20, Josh caught one also on the zebra midge, and I managed to get one on an olive nymph #16. All fish ranged between 6 and 9 inches. I managed to miss three other fish, one being somewhere around 11 inches. Anyways, Josh had to leave early for some reason so we said goodbye and went to the next spot.

The next spot we hit was beautiful, but the water was fast and hard to fish so we had to fish the outer part of the pool. I ended up catching one and losing one both being Brown Trout. Alex hit a pool further up and hooked into a beautiful Brownie about 15 or 16 inches which is a massive fish for the location. It ended up spiting the hook leaving Alex bummed.

After the heartbreak we headed over to the last spot of the day, which was a little sketchy to get to but after hopping the fence and crawling down a ravine we made it to the spot. It is a pool about three feet deep and fifteen feet long along a cliff face. We could actually see about twelve fish down there! It took a little while but we both ended up getting some. I managed to get two, one on the olive nymph and one on a caddis style nymph. Alex also caught one. These fish were not very big, but beautiful! The spot died down eventually and we headed for home.

So all together I caught four fish, not the biggest but still an awesome day with awesome memories. To me size of the fish doesn't matter, it's about the places the fish it take you and the people you fish with. The spots we caught fish in are my favorite places because people overlook them and think are too small to hold fish. It's Awesome because if people knew about them there'd be no fish. All were discovered by friends of mine that had nothing better to do but explore. Anyways, thanks for reading!

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por wearleybird wearleybird | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Tons of acorns? It must be a mast year.

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you’ve noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, “masting.”

https://www.lakeconews.com/index.php/news/63386-tons-of-acorns-it-must-be-a-mast-year

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Splitting Fiddlers

Nearly 1000 observations later, I've more or less finished splitting all of the fiddlers labeled only to subfamily Gelasiminae into two tribes (or better). Also took a "break" of sorts in the middle to go through every observation from Uca/Afruca and confirm/update/etc.

Next step will be to compile key indicators for genus/species and do region by region checks for accuracy and specificity. Only 4300 or so to review/re-review. Yeah, think that's not going to happen soon.

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por msr msr | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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The Annapolis Valley joins the international City Nature Challenge!

In 2019 the Halifax area was registered in the international City Nature Challenge (CNC, http://citynaturechallenge.org/). HRM participated with 160 cities from around the world.

Although the weather was miserable – it was held following Earth Day (the last weekend in April) – many people came out to participate and the HRM group almost beat Chicago! Calgary was also participating – their excuse for HRM beating them was that they had a dumping of snow that weekend.

The local CNC objectives were simple. We wished to encourage people of all ages, residents and visitors, to get outdoors; to explore; to observe nature; share observations; and to have fun!

This year several other areas around the Maritimes have joined HRM in signing up to participate. The Valley is one of these areas.

The CNC2020 event isn’t until April but now is the time for us to get organized and to spread the word. As experienced iNatters who have recorded observations from Kings and Annapolis Counties, we would encourage you to join this project (City Nature Challenge 2020: The Annapolis Valley). Any observation collected within the defined area during the dates of the event (April 24 – 27) will automatically be added. By joining the project, you will receive notifications if/when news items are posted to the project page.

If you have any questions, concerns, or ideas related to this event please contact cnc2019HRM@gmail.com

Mary Kennedy (I may live in Dartmouth but I was born in Kentville.)

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por mkkennedy mkkennedy | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Guía de los Peces del Parque Nacional Pre-Delta

El libro fue realizado por Adriana Almirón, Jorge Casciotta, Liliana Cioték y Pablo Giorgis, publicado por la Editorial de la Administración de Parques Nacionales (APN), desde la Dirección de Interpretación y Extensión Ambiental. Se trata de una reedición del año 2008, a la que se le sumaron 44 especies nuevas halladas y registradas hasta el momento en este sector del río Paraná, que en total suman 185.

https://sib.gob.ar/archivos/bfa004429.pdf

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por giramone giramone | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Clave de identificación de cápsulas de huevos de condrictios del Mar Argentino

En la Plataforma Continental Argentina (Atlántico Sudoccidental) se reconocieron 28 especies de condrictios ovíparos. Las cápsulas de huevos depositadas en el lecho marino brindan información muy valiosa tanto para identificar especies así como áreas y épocas de oviposición. Sobre la base del análisis de 155 cápsulas correspondientes a 21 especies de condrictios se proporciona una clave de campo ilustrada para proceder a una rápida identificación......

https://www.oceandocs.org/handle/1834/3459

Citation
INIDEP informe técnico, 77. p. 1-14

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por giramone giramone | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Νέα επιστημονική δημοσίευση με τη πρώτη καταγραφή του είδους Lutjanus argentimaculatus από την Ελλάδα

Μέσα από παρατηρήσεις επιστημόνων-ερευνητών που συμμετέχουν στο πρόγραμμα δημοσιεύσαμε τις πρώτες καταγραφές του ξενικού είδους Lutjanus argentimaculatus από την Ελλάδα. Τα δεδομένα μας υποστηρίζουν ότι το είδος έχει εγκαθιδρυθεί τόσο στην Ελλάδα όσο και στην Ανατολική Μεσόγειο.

Βρες τη πλήρη δημοσίευση εδώ: https://www.reabic.net/journals/bir/2019/Accepted/BIR_2019_Tiralongo_etal_correctedproof.pdf?fbclid=IwAR0TOrRj9F_h6pLxwi5i1PIV2ZLx7vU3jSOEtT5dFSBLPM2CacZSmNay4Ts

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por isea_org isea_org | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Oct 2019 - Chumphon and Phetchaburi, Thailand

25-30 October 2019 South Thailand : 300+ records, 120+ species .

- Saphli Villa Beach Chumphon
- Khao Dinsor
- Ban Bang Home Resort
- Phetchaburi Salt Pan

Notable observations :
Danaus affinis

Hypolimnas misippus

Charaxes echo, Polyura delphis

Marsdenia tinctoria, Secamone elliptica

300+ observtions, 120+ speices :
-- Bird : 31 species,
-- Moth : 7 species,
-- Butterfly : 58 species,
-- Insect without lepidoptera: 13+ species.
-- Plant : 18 species,


Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por gancw1 gancw1 | 59 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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November/December

We are at 190 birds. I don’t expect to get any new species before the end of the year, but am looking forward to wintering raptors and ducks in mating plumage, these next couple months. Please keep up the amazing work everyone.

Good spots to bird this winter

Fernhill wetlands
Commonwealth Lake
Tualatin River Wildlife Refuge

Happy birding

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por chrisleearm chrisleearm | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Beaverton Birds

Went birding in local park known as Commonwealth lake, amd then the adjacent park Foothills Park. Between the two of them I got 25 or so species. But the best ones were, Merlin perched on a conifer, and moving adound the back end of Commonwealth Lake. A mixed flock of kinglets, chickadees, nuthatches, and busthtits foraging in a section of trees at Foothills park. A lone Hermit Thrush in a tree at Foothills Park. A Brown Creeper among the mixed flock, working tree trunks. And Finally a Fox Sparrow, seen in the top of a bush. The Hermit Thrush was a new bird for that county for me.

Ingresado el 17 de noviembre de 2019 por chrisleearm chrisleearm | 3 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Funding, Infrastructure costs, Images on Amazon

Thanks for your thoughtful consideration of the kinds of nonprofits you support.

For the last three years, iNaturalist has been almost entirely grant funded from individual philanthropists (many with a long history of philanthropy through the California Academy of Sciences), the National Geographic Society, foundations such as the Moore Foundation, and tech companies such as Microsoft through their tAI for Earth initiative, and Google through their tGeo for Good initiative. We also have some project-based funding like the funds we received from the World Wildlife Fund to develop Seek 2.0.

While individual donations from the iNaturalist community currently constitute a small percentage of our overall revenue, we’d love to see that percentage grow. The more sustaining donors we have, the less time we and the development team at CAS have to spend wondering how to meet the next year’s budget requirements.

As a department of the California Academy of Sciences, 15% of additional funds we bring in go toward overhead for CalAcademy, and this includes individual donations. In addition to financial support, they provide office space, legal services, accounting, communications support, and other functions, so the overhead is a way that iNaturalist pays into those costs shared across the institution. The remaining 85% stays within the department to cover staff and operational expenses, like paying Discourse to host this forum, or paying Amazon for image hosting.

The single largest expense for iNaturalist is personnel. iNaturalist has 8 full-time staff in the USA (6 in the Bay Area, 2 remote on the East Coast) and one contractor.

For the CalAcademy fiscal year July 2018 - June 2019, iNaturalist spent $174,000 on infrastructure and miscellaneous expenses. These are the non-personnel related expenses. Like almost everything else about iNaturalist (e.g. users, data, traffic)—except the number of staff— these costs are almost doubling each year.

Donating to iNaturalist 1 (or not) is of course a personal choice. We hope this helps inform your decision. We understand that users have different means and appreciate all of the many ways that people support iNaturalist, financial or otherwise.

Ingresado el 16 de noviembre de 2019 por ahospers ahospers | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Making Observations

Hi Folks,

Just a heads up that this weekend would be the best time to make your observations. You need 10 observations of sufficient quality that the plants can be identified. You cannot use an unidentified observation in your table of results. i am just concerned that people might only make 10 observations, and then have to go back out and make some more at the last minute.
I posted a number of iNaturalist tutorials in the instructions for the iNaturalist Group Project, it might be a good idea to review these before heading out into the filed.
Best tip, take 3 photos of different features of the plant; leaf, how the leaves attach to the stem, and one of the whole plant; shrub, vine, tree, flower.
I will make some observations this week and upload them to the project as a guide.
Don't agree with the suggested identifications from iNaturalist, unless you can identify the plant to species level.
Finally, collaborating with team mates should be done through Canvas, rather than through iNaturalist.

have fun.

Ingresado el 16 de noviembre de 2019 por barry_thomson barry_thomson | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Those black bears you see in Southern California, this is how they arrived

Original source: https://www.sbsun.com/2019/01/07/those-black-bears-you-see-in-southern-california-this-is-how-they-arrived/amp/

It may be surprising or even a little disappointing, but the iconic black bears that roam wild in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains didn’t arrive there in ancient times through a process of natural migration, but instead they arrived in 1933, in crates, in the back of trucks.

The importation of black bears was the brainchild of J. Dale Gentry, chairman of the California Fish and Game Commission from 1931 to 1934. Gentry was also a wealthy and sometimes eccentric San Bernardino businessman, best known for his ownership of the California Hotel. As an avid sportsman, Gentry believed that reintroducing bears to the local mountains would benefit the ecosystem and boost tourism.

Before the arrival of humans, grizzly bears were the unopposed monarchs of the area mountains. According to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the grizzly bear population was the likely reason that black bears did not naturally inhabit the area.

The California grizzly’s habitat began shrinking in the late 1800s when the state’s human population began to expand. The grizzly’s potentially ferocious nature ultimately led to their rapid extermination. The last grizzly in Southern California was killed in 1916, in Tujunga Canyon near Sunland. The last one in the state was killed in August 1922, in Tulare County.

Gentry’s transplantation plan came to fruition in October 1933, when the Fish and Game Commission captured six black bears in Yosemite, and released them in the Santa Ana River Canyon, near Seven Oaks, about 6 miles south of Big Bear Lake.

Gentry announced that more bears would be released over time, and that they would not be a danger to the local wildlife. “They will not harm deer or any other game,” he said. “They are not to be confused with the ferocious grizzly, as the black bear is of an entirely different species.” Gentry must have felt he had personal expertise in the subject, since he owned a young black bear that was given to him by a Shasta County game warden.

The Fish and Game Commission released six more black bears into the San Bernardino Mountains on Nov. 14, 1933. The release of these animals was captured on film. Six black bears had been released in the San Gabriel Mountains near Crystal Lake a few days earlier.

The total number of bears released into the local mountains as part of Gentry’s transplant program ranges from 18 to 34.

On Nov. 17, 1933, one of the recently released bears was sighted in Cucamonga, ambling across the intersection of Archibald Avenue and McKinley Street, where Cucamonga Elementary School now sits. The oblivious bear caused quite a commotion and frightened a group of children on their way to school before it disappeared into an orange grove. Outraged parents quickly contacted commissioner Gentry and demanded he “come pick up his pet.”

The defiant Gentry responded in the Nov. 18, 1933, issue of the San Bernardino Sun, “I don’t see why people are so worried about these bears. They wouldn’t harm anyone.”

On Nov. 20, the Cucamonga bear was cornered in a eucalyptus tree in Ontario, where it kept game wardens at bay for two days. The bear had reportedly been sampling the local bee hives before it scampered up the tree. When the bear finally came down, it was captured, and returned to its original release site in the Big Bear area.

The renegade Cucamonga-Ontario bear had traveled at least 50 miles in just over two weeks, clearly demonstrating the extensive range the animals can cover. Just a few days earlier, another black bear was found on a power pole in Yucaipa.

Sightings of “Gentry’s bears” became frequent, and some residents of mountain and foothill communities grew increasingly angry about the “ferocious beasts” that had been released.

The biggest uproar over Gentry’s bears came in June 1934, when two of the animals were shot and killed after raiding outdoor refrigerators in Wrightwood. One of the bears was killed by William Bristol, a well-known author, rancher, and owner of Wrightwood’s Acorn Lodge. The other bear was brought down with a .22 caliber rifle by Clyde Steele, also a Wrightwood lodge owner.

Gentry asked the district attorney in San Bernardino to bring charges against both men for illegally shooting the bears.

Rarely had two men of such resolve and unique character like Gentry and Bristol tangled in San Bernardino courts, and the newspapers carried extensive coverage of the bear killing case. On July 20, 1933, a jury found Steele not guilty of the bear crime, and a few days later, the district attorney dropped the charges against Bristol.

In December 1933, Gov. Frank F. Merriam asked Gentry to step down from his position of State Fish and Game commissioner. While there was no direct mention of the bear escapades being the cause of the dismissal, there was little doubt the string of misadventures played a major role in the governor’s request.

You can call it misguided, unfortunate, or brilliant, but there’s no question that Gentry’s unusual transplant experiment accounts for a significant portion of the wild bears that roam the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains today.

Mark Landis is a freelance writer. He can be reached at historyinca@yahoo.com.

Ingresado el 16 de noviembre de 2019 por jessicawest jessicawest | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Panther Scat

The Panther that was killed in a vehicle collision in Martin County, Florida, near Indiantown on 11.02.19, was closer to "my normal hiking range" than I expected it to be. I did see a Panther here in (western) Palm Beach County back in circa 1987 and I occasionally look for them in Collier County, Florida. Writing this I did find out one fitting the description of the one killed, was captured on several Trail Cameras in western PBC.

On 11.13.19, I hiked the Grove Trail in Jones/Hungryland and I came out on Indiantown Road and walked that 1/4 mile on the road before heading north again (because I spent most of the morning on an unpopular trail that was overgrown). Unknowing of the incident, I was right near that spot where the Panther got killed. I photographed some larger than usual scat than what I normally see and shared it with a Facebook friend, Carmel Severson. She said, it could be, but size is important, what were the measurements of the scat? Length of stool segment & width. Quick lesson: diameter of scat will be approximately 1.25 - 1.5" thick. The segments within the stool will be short & tend to tip at the tail end. Color will vary depending on prey & portion of prey eaten & freshness of stool.

I thought about throwing on the ground my wooden 6 inch ruler, but wrestling brushes and not even halfway yet, I was lazy.

I asked her if anyone tests scat? She said, I can contact FWC, and ask for the Panther Team Vet or Biologist - to test the scat sample. Collecting use gloves. Parasites are transmissible. Call them to check collection protocols/ how they want it contained. Usually plastic or a glass sealed container, if bagged, double bag & paper. Then she sent a later comment, more on puma poo - the string or cord is usually segmented, however, it can have a ropelike appearance. You may find a pile of segments which have broken into several chunks. The cord can be 5 - 9.5" long, but the diameter is over an inch usually 1.25 to 1.5". Black, brown or whitish grey. The older scat will be whitish. Scat after organ meats will be darker & more, runny. The richer the meat the likelihood of mushy stool. Often in the drier well formed scat you can see lots of hair & bone debris. Occasionally they will eat grass, so that will show also. Puma (meat-eater) scat tends to be quiet pungent especially when fresh.

Ingresado el 16 de noviembre de 2019 por arthur-windsor arthur-windsor | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Fallen Trees are Time Capsules

Dinosaurs did not inhabit Florida, therefore there are not any Dinosaur bones here, but since the state has been submerged under the Ocean multiple times due to Glaciers melting and freezing, there is an enormous amount of evidence of this history just about everywhere you look. Shells that are millions of years old can found everywhere, and yesterday I can across a huge fallen tree with a massive root system. The round part of the root system that was now vertical, was above my head, and was caked with shells. I saw this again earlier in the week at another location, this time with a Palm Tree; almost nothing but shells. Could they have been Indian Mounds? I suppose, but I witness this so much and the ground here in South Florida has visible shells all over, I doubt most of this I encounter are piles of shells discarded from Indians. I do scrap away some of the outer clinging shells when I find a fallen tree, in hopes of finding something interesting, but always find more shells.

Ingresado el 16 de noviembre de 2019 por arthur-windsor arthur-windsor | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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