09 de julio de 2020

Coyote Behavior in Summer (June – September)

In summer, coyote packs with new pups are busy teaching the youngest members everything there is to know about being a coyote – how to hunt, which paths to travel, and how to thrive in a unique urban wilderness. Urban coyotes have a 60% chance of survival during their first year of life, with car collisions accounting for the highest cause of death. Coyote activity increases during these summer months and coincides with our highest outdoor activity. Therefore, the highest chances for human and coyote interactions generally occur from June through August, before tapering off in September. This is also the time of year where the most altercations between dogs and coyotes occur. It is extremely important to exercise caution when visiting natural areas during this time, especially with pets.
Heed any caution signs you may encounter and stick to trails and open paths that allow you to see and react to coyotes ahead of time. Be vigilant of your surroundings as well as your children and pets. Before heading to a park or natural area, check resources such as Milwaukee County Coyote Watch or an online neighborhood forum to view any recent reports of coyote activity in the area you want to visit. If you are unsure about an area, contact the Milwaukee County Parks Department or the Wisconsin DNR for more information. If an encounter does occur, stand tall and assertive without turning your back to a coyote and leave the area. For further reading on dog and coyote interactions specifically, refer to this article from the Urban Coyote Initiative: https://urbancoyoteinitiative.com/what-to-do-if-you-encounter-a-coyote-while-walking-your-dog/.

Ingresado el 09 de julio de 2020 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

28 de mayo de 2020

Coyote Behavior in Spring (March – Early June)

Springtime in the life of a coyote is defined by the birth of pups. Mating activity typically lasts from February through March, and new litters are born after a 9-week gestation period in April and May. The number of pups produced is generally dependent on available food resources and the surrounding coyote population, and in urban areas can average around 6 pups. Raising young is a team effort and the entire pack contributes to the success of a litter. A coyote pack consists of the alpha pair – the only two members of a pack to mate – and generally one or two of their offspring from previous litters that help raise the current litter. For the next several weeks after birth, the mother spends her time primarily in the den with the pups, while the father and subordinate members take turns hunting and staying vigilant of the den sites. Within a few weeks, coyote pups are weaned and begin to exit the den to play and socialize with other pack members. By the time they are around 9 weeks old, den sites are abandoned, and the pups begin to travel along with the pack for the summer season.
Coyote sightings may decrease during the early spring as the pack sticks close to the den, which in parks and natural areas are often secluded and well-hidden in thick brush, rocky outcrops, and in holes under fallen trees, for example. However, it is important to keep caution when visiting these areas as this is a highly sensitive period for coyotes, and their behavior towards their litters can be extremely protective. A human with or without a pet may experience a type of behavior known as ‘escorting’, where a coyote may follow at a closer distance than usual in order to remove you from the area of their den. Though hazing is usually recommended when in close contact with coyotes, hazing techniques during pup season can be ineffective and can further escalate any tense situations. Therefore, the best course of action is to leave the area as confidently as possible, without running. Keeping pets on leash and close to you is crucial in such a situation. Never let your pets wander into thick brush where there are potential den sites – coyotes are intolerant of dogs during this time and may bite or attack if they feel threatened. In areas where coyote activity is known, the best option may be to walk your pets in more manicured park areas or bring them to one of Milwaukee County’s designated dog parks.

Ingresado el 28 de mayo de 2020 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

10 de diciembre de 2019

Coyote Behavior in Winter (November - March)

It is not uncommon for coyote sightings to increase during the winter months in Wisconsin. In parks and natural areas, foliage is sparse so it may be easier to see coyotes moving throughout their environment. Although urban coyotes are primarily active during dawn and dusk in order to avoid human interactions, the winter season presents challenges to a coyote’s typical routine. Because their main food sources such as rodents and wild vegetation are harder to come by in winter, coyotes may expend extra energy to locate food sources elsewhere. Sometimes, the search for food leads a normally wary coyote to try their luck in our neighborhoods. As we prepare our yards for the winter season, it is a great opportunity to “coyote-proof” the perimeter of our homes. Discourage coyote activity by securing the lids on all garbage bins and replacing any carts that are easily accessible to wildlife. Never leave food scraps outdoors for wildlife, and do not feed your pets outdoors. Keep the ground below bird feeders clean from debris that attract squirrels and rodents, which in turn may attract coyotes. Especially at night, it may be best to accompany your pets when they need to go outdoors.

Winter can also be a time of new pack formations for some coyotes, although this is dependent on available resources and populations in a territory. Transient coyotes from previous litters may seek out a mate and become established in a new space. Mated pairs typically display courtship behavior and may become defensive of their mate, particularly during the height of mating season in January and February. Though they will not use a den until a litter is born, coyotes may begin to select or create new dens and may monitor these areas closely as pup season nears. When visiting parks and other natural areas, exercise regular caution especially in an area with known coyote activity. If you come across a pair of coyotes at a comfortable distance, give them their space and leave the area. If a coyote comes too close, haze the coyote to keep their natural fear of humans intact. It is especially important to make sure that dogs are always on leash so that they do not chase wildlife or investigate a coyote’s space during this time of protectiveness.

Ingresado el 10 de diciembre de 2019 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

11 de abril de 2017

Coyote Denning/Pup Rearing Notification

April is the denning and pup rearing season for coyotes in Wisconsin! During this time of year, residents and park users are encouraged to exercise caution around coyotes that are protective of their dens and/or newborn pups. Coyotes are very adaptable, timid and elusive animals that will build their dens in hard-to-find locations such as secluded parts of parks and golf courses, sometimes using abandoned woodchuck or fox den sites, and even denning in man-made culverts. Typically, a den is made up to two or more tunnels leading to a 3-4 foot deep hole in the ground, the entrance to the den is usually about 10 inches wide by 13 inches high (check out the photo below for reference!). One key preventative measure to avoid conflict is to keep dogs leashed during the denning period unless, you’re in an area you know to be “coyote-free”, such as the designated Milwaukee County Parks Dog Parks, which are fenced off. If you encounter a coyote near its den, or with its pups, do NOT attempt to haze, or scare, that animal as it will remain protective of its pups. Instead, calmly leave the area and report your coyote sighting to the Milwaukee County Coyote Watch page on iNaturalist.org (http://www.inaturalist.org/pr…/milwaukee-county-coyote-watch).

Pups are born with short, yellow-brown fur. After about 10 ten days, their eyes open and they start crawling around the den. The male brings food to the female while she stays with the pups for the first 2 months. Some of the food is regurgitated (barfed back up) to feed the pups. At about 3 weeks old, the pups head outside of the den to play. If you find a coyote pup that looks sick or injured, visit the DNR website and search keyword “Keep Wildlife Wild” to know what to do and who to call. You should never bring any wild animal into your home, as this is unsafe for the animal as well as for you and your family and pets. By the time the pups are 8-9 weeks old, they have been weaned (no longer need their mother's milk) and the den has been abandoned. Coyotes will use different den sites during this time. By the end of the summer, the pups usually move out of the parents' territories. Sometimes the young coyotes stay with the parents to form a hunting pack (WI DNR).

Ingresado el 11 de abril de 2017 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de febrero de 2017

Recent Coyote Activity near Granville Dog Park

Coyotes are common inhabitants of urban natural areas such as the Menomonee River Parkway. Coyotes do not begin to den until late March/April. In January/February coyotes are within their breeding season, establishing their territories and looking for a mate. While general sightings of coyotes should not be cause for concern, we do want to deter them from establishing a denning area in or near the dog park come April. This can be achieved through aggressive hazing efforts when coyotes are seen within the dog park from now until April.

Here are a few reminders about how to haze a coyote and avoid potential conflict with them in the future (at home and in the parks).
*Do not feed coyotes – make sure that any dog treats or food brought into the dog park are either taken out with you or disposed of properly.
*Haze coyotes seen within the dog park - hazing is a form of behavior modification that involves using scare tactics to deter a wild animal from frequenting an area (yelling, throwing objects towards an animal, using noise makers such as whistles, etc.). Do not haze sick or injured animals. If you see a sick or injured animal, please contact the Wisconsin Humane Society's Wildlife Rehabilitation Center (414) 431-6204.
*Report coyote sightings to our online reporting page on iNaturalist.org, the Milwaukee County Coyote Watch. This will allow wildlife managers to monitor coyote behavior and also serves as a way for members of the public to monitor coyote activity in their area (Google “Milwaukee County Coyote Watch”).
*Do not allow your dogs to “play” with coyotes. Encounters like this can and do happen. While playful in nature, they should not be allowed because it can lead to habituation of that animal and/or the possible transmission of disease/illness.

Ingresado el 08 de febrero de 2017 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

31 de octubre de 2016

Help Spread the Word!

Help us spread information about coyotes across Milwaukee County! If you are a part of a neighborhood association, a member of a “Next Door” Community, or receive neighborhood updates through email or print newsletters, please help us to reach out to your neighbors about coyotes in your neighborhoods and local parks. Share the information below in whatever way is preferred, and contact Dianne Robinson (Dianne.robinson@wisconsin.gov) or Julia Robson (Julia.robson@milwaukeecountywi.gov) with questions.

"Coyotes sightings in and near our neighborhoods in Milwaukee County are quite common and are rarely a cause for concern. However, Milwaukee County Parks and the Wisconsin DNR are interested in this information to monitor coyote activity and coyote behavior. If you see a coyote, please report this observation to the “Milwaukee County Coyote Watch” project page at iNaturalist.org (http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/milwaukee-county-coyote-watch). If you know coyotes are present in your area, it is always important to keep a close eye on your pet when outside, regardless of their size, and be sure to inform your neighbors to not feed urban wildlife in their yards or local parks. If you have questions, visit the DNR’s Urban Coyote webpage (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/urbancoyote.html) or our Urban Wildlife webpage (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/urban.html) for more information. Thank you for your help!"

Ingresado el 31 de octubre de 2016 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

24 de agosto de 2016

Let's Keep Urban Widlife WILD!

We have received several reports of coyotes feeding off of bread and seed/corn piles left in parks and parkways by the public throughout Milwaukee County. Direct or indirect feeding of urban wildlife is one of the leading causes of habituation of wild animals such as coyotes, raccoons, and foxes. It is very important to not feed a wild animal 'human food items' because non-natural food items will most likely cause more harm and will not provide nutritional benefits. Urban wildlife can meet their dietary needs from the natural food base that is available to them in our urban natural areas. Preventing habituation of urban wildlife is key in promoting a positive coexistence!

Ingresado el 24 de agosto de 2016 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

30 de marzo de 2016

Coyote Denning/Pup Season Notification

April is around the corner, as is the denning and pup rearing season for coyotes in Wisconsin! During this time of year, residents and park users are encouraged to exercise caution around coyotes that are protective of their dens and/or newborn pups. Coyotes are very adaptable, timid and elusive animals that will build their dens in hard-to-find locations such as secluded parts of parks and golf courses, sometimes using abandoned woodchuck or fox den sites, and even denning in man-made culverts. Typically, a den is made up to two or more tunnels leading to a 3-4 foot deep hole in the ground, the entrance to the den is usually about 10 inches wide by 13 inches high (check out the photo below for reference!). One key preventative measure to avoid conflict is to keep dogs leashed during the denning period unless, you’re in an area you know to be “coyote-free”, such as the designated Milwaukee County Parks Dog Parks, which are fenced off. If you encounter a coyote near its den, or with its pups, do NOT attempt to haze, or scare, that animal as it will remain protective of its pups. Instead, calmly leave the area and report your coyote sighting to the Milwaukee County Coyote Watch page on iNaturalist.org (http://www.inaturalist.org/pr…/milwaukee-county-coyote-watch).

Pups are born with short, yellow-brown fur. After about 10 ten days, their eyes open and they start crawling around the den. The male brings food to the female while she stays with the pups for the first 2 months. Some of the food is regurgitated (barfed back up) to feed the pups. At about 3 weeks old, the pups head outside of the den to play. If you find a coyote pup that looks sick or injured, visit the DNR website and search keyword “Keep Wildlife Wild” to know what to do and who to call. You should never bring any wild animal into your home, as this is unsafe for the animal as well as for you and your family and pets. By the time the pups are 8-9 weeks old, they have been weaned (no longer need their mother's milk) and the den has been abandoned. Coyotes will use different den sites during this time. By the end of the summer, the pups usually move out of the parents' territories. Sometimes the young coyotes stay with the parents to form a hunting pack (WI DNR).

Ingresado el 30 de marzo de 2016 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

15 de marzo de 2016

Coyote Notification (March 2016)

We have had several reports of increased coyote activity within the Wisconsin Avenue Park area recently. Reports include single and pairs of coyotes moving through the park during the day and occasional howling from nearby woodlots. This is not unusual behavior, but warrants awareness.

One of the primary goals of the Milwaukee County Coyote Watch is to learn how to proactively manage potential conflict with urban canids. Coyotes play an important role in our urban ecosystems by preying on small mammals such as rabbits, rats, squirrels, and mice. While we do not have any evidence of these coyotes displaying aggressive behavior, increased coyote activity provides a perfect opportunity for proactive management; therefore, we encourage residents in this area to take precautionary steps, especially with pets, including:

  1. If you see a coyote, make an effort to scare the individual away by yelling, waving arms, or throwing small objects in the direction of the animal. It is important that coyotes associate humans with fear. A proper response for a coyote would be to run away. Hazing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlC8KTDiIRs&feature=youtu.be

  2. Be vigilant while letting pets out, especially at night. Always keep an eye on them while they are outside, even on a leash.

  3. Eliminate any food sources in your yard, including pet food and overfilled bird feeders (spilled bird seed attracts prey for coyotes), and keep compost bins tidy.

  4. Report any sightings of these coyotes on iNaturalist. This helps to keep us informed about encounters with these animals and allows us to let residents of Milwaukee know about potential situations like this!
    http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/milwaukee-county-coyote-watch



  5. Ingresado el 15 de marzo de 2016 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

    15 de febrero de 2016

    UPDATE: 4 Tagged Coyotes in Wauwatosa Area

    Our team was able to trap and tag 4 adult male coyotes in the Wauwatosa area this past week. The animals were fitted with uniquely colored tags on their ears in order to make them more readily identifiable to staff and members of the public that are reporting their interactions with animals in this target area. Please keep your eyes peeled for animals with ear tags and report to this database on their behaviors if observed/encountered!

    Ingresado el 15 de febrero de 2016 por milwaukeecountyparks milwaukeecountyparks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario