16 de marzo de 2019

In case you missed it — iNaturalist has a new forum!

iNat moved from Google Groups to a new forum hosted on the Discourse platform.
Sign in with your iNaturalist account here:

https://forum.inaturalist.org

Ingresado el 16 de marzo de 2019 por bouteloua bouteloua | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de marzo de 2019

Northeast Chapter of the Illinois Native Plant Society: Upcoming Events

Chicago-proximate friends, the Northeast Chapter of the Illinois Native Plant Society has a few events coming up so far this year after a lil lapse in activity in 2018. Join the Northeast Chapter here (or, other Illinois folk, your local chapter!).

Have an idea for a field trip, evening lecture, or other event? Reach out to us at northeast.inps@gmail.com

Field Museum Herbarium Tour

Sunday, March 17th at 1PM
Join Iza Redlinski and Michael Huft for a tour of the Field Museum's herbarium, a vast collection of over 2 million plant specimens, including many collected locally in the Chicago region. Enjoy complimentary entrance to the museum following the tour. As space for this tour is limited, must RSVP to receive event details and meeting location (priority to INPS members): http://bit.ly/flatplants — currently waitlist only

Hike at Illinois Beach State Park and Chiwaukee Prairie

Monday, May 27th at 9:30AM
Hike the trail at Illinois' first nature preserve with your fellow native plant enthusiasts! See dozens of rare natives and spring wildflowers in multiple unique and rare habitats including beach dunes and pannes. You already have the day off, come join us at 9:30 AM at the Nature Center, rain or shine! Dress for the weather and bring good boots. It's usually not wet along the trails at IBSP. After a lunch at Culver's (or bring your own) we often drive a few minutes north to Chiwaukee Prairie for the afternoon, which often has wet trails. The trip to Chiwaukee is optional, but spectacular. RSVP to http://bit.ly/puccoon2019

Flora & Ecology of Deer Grove West Forest Preserve

Saturday, June 1st at 1PM
The first forest preserve in Cook County, Deer Grove West contains fine examples of oak woodland, forested ravines, and moranic depressional wetlands. This tour will focus on the site's ecology and highlight some of the rich flora that can be found throughout this preserve. Space is limited, RSVP here: http://bit.ly/deergrove2019 (priority given to INPS members).


Future events in your inbox by joining up, and you can check our website to stay in the loop too.

Ingresado el 12 de marzo de 2019 por bouteloua bouteloua | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de enero de 2019

A Welcome Message

Welcoming new users:
https://www.inaturalist.org/users/recent?obs=yes

Hi, welcome to iNaturalist! Here are a few links to pages you might find helpful:

*<a href="https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/getting+started">Getting Started Guide</a>
*<a href="https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/help">Frequently Asked Questions</a>
*<a href="https://forum.inaturalist.org">iNaturalist Forum</a>
*<a href="https://www.inaturalist.org/blog">iNaturalist Blog</a>

If you need help, feel free to reach out to me personally—you can tag me in a comment by writing @bouteloua, or asking the community at large via the <a href="https://forum.inaturalist.org">iNaturalist forum</a>, or by shooting a message to the help desk at help@inaturalist.org. Again, welcome! Hope you stick around. :) 

cassi (@bouteloua)
volunteer curator here on iNaturalist

renders:

Hi, welcome to iNaturalist! Here are a few links to pages you might find helpful:

*Getting Started Guide
*Frequently Asked Questions
*iNaturalist Forum
*iNaturalist Blog

If you need help, feel free to reach out to me personally—you can tag me in a comment by writing @bouteloua, or asking the community at large via the iNaturalist forum, or by shooting a message to the help desk at help@inaturalist.org. Again, welcome! Hope you stick around. :)

cassi (@bouteloua)
volunteer curator here on iNaturalist

Ingresado el 02 de enero de 2019 por bouteloua bouteloua | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario

13 de octubre de 2018

Identifying Solidago altissima & Solidago canadensis

Modified from Flora of North America, Minnesota Wildflowers, Weakley 2018, Flora of the Chicago Region 2017.

Solidago altissima subsp. altissima Solidago altissima subsp. gilvocanescens Solidago canadensis var. canadensis Solidago canadensis var. hargeri
Range and prevalence in North America: Broad. Most of eastern North America and some spots in the west (map). Most common species, dominating old-fields. Midwest/Great Plains (map). Begins replacing S. altissima subsp. altissima when moving toward the Great Plains. Upper Midwest, northeastern North America. (map) Eastern Great Plains, Upper Midwest, northeastern North America (map)
Flowerhead shape: Messier, spikes of flowerheads not so neat; can be taller than wide Messier, spikes of flowerheads not so neat; can be taller than wide ? Graceful, neatly arranged lateral spikes; pyramid wider than tall
Involucre: 3-4.5+ mm tall 2-3 mm tall 1.7–2.5 mm tall
(apparently sometimes 3 mm)
1.7–2.5 mm tall
(apparently sometimes 3 mm)
Phenology (Chicago Region): Later: August 28 - October 22 ? Earlier: July 19 - September 19 Earlier: July 19 - September 19
Pappus: Pappus hairs >2.4 mm long Pappus hairs >2.4 mm long Pappus hairs <2.3 mm long Pappus hairs <2.3 mm long
Stem: Usually short-hairy throughout Usually short-hairy throughout Mid to proximal stems hairless or just sparsely hairy Mid to proximal stems sparsely to moderately hairy
Big round stem galls: Got'em Got'em Don't got'em (?)* Don't got'em (?)*
Foliage: -Grey-green tone
-Leaves thicker, firmer
-Entire or with few, small teeth, mostly upper half
-Hairy underside
-Upper surface hairs rough with minute bulbous bases
-Grey-green tone
-Leaves thicker, firmer
-Entire or with few, small teeth, mostly upper half
-Hairy underside
-Upper surface hairs short, curved, spreading
-Not grey-green
-Leaves thinner, more lax
-More coarsely toothed throughout
-If hairy, only on veins below
-Not grey-green
-Leaves thinner, more lax
-More coarsely toothed throughout
-Hairy underside

*Conflicting info in FNA and Flora of the Chicago Region, the latter of which says stem galls do occur on both S. altissima and S. canadensis.

Ingresado el 13 de octubre de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 8 comentarios | Deja un comentario

07 de octubre de 2018

Identifying Sambucus "nigra" in eastern North America

From GoBotany and Michigan Flora:

Sambucus nigra (sensu stricto)
previously known as S. nigra subsp. nigra
Sambucus canadensis
previously known as S. nigra subsp. canadensis
Larger, can be a small tree up to 10 m tall Smaller, shrub up to 2.5 m tall
Branchlets with abundant lenticels Branchlets with sparse lenticels
3-7 leaflets, usually 5 5-11 leaflets, usually 7
Petals yellow-white, carpels usually with 3 stigmas (sometimes 4) Petals white, carpels with 4 stigmas (sometimes 3 or 5)
Pendulous fruiting clusters More-or-less erect fruiting clusters
Drupe dingy purple, turning black, 6-8 mm wide Drupe bright red, turning purple-black, 4-5 mm wide

(also a test of the new table format)

Ingresado el 07 de octubre de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

01 de septiembre de 2018

Curating Needs

Last updated January 11, 2019

Partially using this as a note to self, but thought I'd throw these out there rather than only squirrel the links away as bookmarks. To any curators or potential-curators looking for a task, here are:

* Stranded taxa that have observations (89 taxa)
* Spam patrol (a lot)
* Unresolved flags (thousands)

If you're not a curator but interested in lending a hand with the site taxonomy and/or other needs, read through the Curator Guide (https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/curator+guide) and shoot an email to help@inaturalist.org. : )

Common Flag Resolution Recommendations


* Pornographic images or anything that needs to be deleted swiftly - You can hide this type of inappropriate content by flagging as spam (hides from anyone who isn't an iNat curator/admin). Then email help@inaturalist.org requesting deletion.

* Spam - 99+ times out of a 100, spam flags should be left unresolved. iNat's definition of spam is anything clearly intended to make money. If it is actual spam, like blocks of text intended to drive search engine rankings, links to commercial websites, or blatant product advertisement, leave the flag unresolved.

* Flagged as spam, but it's not spam - There is a "3 strikes" rule with spam flags. If a user's comments, observations, messages, or other content is flagged as spam 3 times, their account is suspended. Sometimes people are suspended when they shouldn't be! If a comment or message is flagged, I've found that more often than not, those flags are false positives. If a comment doesn't look like spam, resolve the flag. If a message is flagged and the user looks legit, there is a boilerplate response here. If inappropriate content is flagged as spam, resolve the spam flag and reflag as inappropriate if needed. Spam flags should only be used for content intended to make money.

* Duplicate observation - Check if it's actually a duplicate. Sometimes the user has uploaded the same photo but observed 2 different organisms. Otherwise, iNat staff have instructed us to flag duplicates and leave the flags unresolved.

* Missing taxon or taxon changes - follow the Curator Guide and add the taxon or commit the taxon change, if appropriate. Be sure to check the taxonomic policies every once in a while as they do change.

* Not an organism - If it's a new user, guide them toward appropriate use of iNat and mark it as no evidence of organism in the Data Quality Assessment section (DQA).

* Observation of a human - just ID as human and resolve the flag.

* Trolling - It's usually best to just ignore someone who's clearly trolling. You can use the DQA to mark it as not wild or no evidence of organism if appropriate. If it's a pattern of bad behavior, especially if it's affecting other users' observations, send an email to help@inaturalist.org explaining the situation, with URLs.

* Observation rather than photo is flagged as copyright infringement: Resolve the flag and flag the photo(s) as copyright infringement directly.

* Incorrect, but well-intentioned ID is flagged: Resolve the flag and let the user know that IDs shouldn't be flagged unless they're clearly malicious or purposefully incorrect.

* Photo on taxon page incorrectly identified: Remove the photo and/or let them know how they can adjust the photos themselves.

* Taxon needs to be marked as native/introduced in a certain place: Change the status and provide instruction on how they can do this themselves, which are listed here: https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/curator+guide#flags


Previously on: Dealing with low quality observations and inappropriate content on iNaturalist

Ingresado el 01 de septiembre de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario

24 de mayo de 2018

Illinois Native Plant Society 2018 Annual Gathering

June 8-10, 2018, at Governors State University, University Park, IL

An examination of the plants and ecosystems of the southern section of the Morainal and Lake Plain Natural Divisions of Illinois and Indiana

This year’s annual INPS gathering will be hosted by the Kankakee-Torrent Chapter of the Illinois Native Plant Society in University Park, Illinois with numerous field trips to locations in Illinois and Indiana. Governors State University is about a 45 minute drive from Chicago; many of the field trips are within that driving distance too.

Registration Deadline – June 1, 2018
More information & register: https://ill-inps.org/2018-annual-gathering/

Field trip options include:
Sand Ridge Nature Preserve
Powderhorn Marsh & Prairie
Indian Boundary Prairies
Clark & Pine
Ivanhoe North
McMahon Woods & Fen
Cranberry Slough
Miller Woods
Cowles Bog
Chicago Ridge Prairie
Sculpture Park
Hickory Creek
Goodenow Grove

Also:
Friday social, Saturday membership meeting, banquet, silent auction
Presentation by Gerould Wilhelm
Sedge workshop with Paul Marcum
Native woody plant nursery tour at Possibility Place
Limestone Park Bioblitz

More info on hotel and camping options, nearby amenities, and t-shirts, and registration on the INPS website: https://ill-inps.org/2018-annual-gathering/

I'm planning on going to Clark & Pine, Ivanhoe North, and of course the bioblitz at Limestone Park. :)

See you there!

Ingresado el 24 de mayo de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

23 de abril de 2018

Dealing with low quality observations and inappropriate content on iNaturalist

As the City Nature Challenge 2018 is beginning to ramp up (Edit: and because iNat was recently chosen as Apple's App of the Day), you may have noticed a ton of new users on the site. You can see the increase happening at the stats page...which is great! But many new users don't know that iNaturalist is a valued resource used by land managers, researchers, organizations, etc. and treat it more like any other social media site. I'm certainly seeing a lot more flags coming in this morning than usual.

Use the Data Quality Assessment section below the observation to mark observations as captive/cultivated, not containing an organism at all, clearly incorrect location or date, etc.

Several people have helped prepare these common responses to inappropriate content & other frequent issues, which include:
* Not an Organism/Test Observations
* Observation of Human
* Multiple Species in One Observation
* Captive/Cultivated Organism (abundance of or not marked as such)
* Copyrighted Images
* Photo Far Away/Not Cropped/Unidentifiable
* Missing Location
* Imprecise Location
* Private Location
* Duplicate Observations
* Bad Identifications (jokes or malicious IDing)

I'd recommend bookmarking that link! Do you have anything to add to that page? Let me know... or just add it if you're a curator.

If you see something inappropriate, you can always flag the offending content (ID, observation, comment, and/or photo). A curator or site staff can take a look and hopefully find a resolution. But if you can, try to use one of those canned type responses before flagging the content. I generally try to engage the user before sending a message to help@inaturalist.org. Some people do need to be suspended right away; check out the Community Guidelines.

Curators, I use these boilerplate responses to flags suuuper frequently. If anyone reading this has been on iNaturalist for a while and is interested in potentially being a curator to help resolve these types of issues, you can reach out to me or help@inaturalist.org directly after reading through the Curator Guide.

When in doubt or if something is extremely inappropriate and should be deleted immediately, you can always email help@inaturalist.org.

Ingresado el 23 de abril de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 8 comentarios | Deja un comentario

29 de marzo de 2018

Search for the Trees that Helped Map Illinois

From the Chicago Region Trees Initiative (CRTI):

"We’re looking for a special kind of witness tree: the historic trees that helped map the state of Illinois. In the early 1800s, surveyors used “bearing trees,” many of them oaks, as landmarks. How many are still with us, as living witnesses to our history? We want to know: How many of these trees survived?

You can help us find out. All you need is a smartphone. You don’t need to know anything about trees or maps to become part of this living history project. We're asking Illinois residents to visit the sites of bearing trees on their property or on public property and record information about any remaining bearing trees left and, if not, what is there now.

The map below includes the locations of the original bearing trees and line trees as recorded by the surveyors in the 1800s. Click on a point to see more information about the species and the size as noted by the surveyor. There is also a place to record your observations, including whether or not the tree is still there- You can even upload photos! Most points on the map are accurate to about 15 feet, so be sure to look nearby for very large trees that might fit the bill."

http://www.chicagorti.org/WitnessTrees

Ingresado el 29 de marzo de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de marzo de 2018

A blog to follow: "Phenology of the East Woods"

"Phenology of the East Woods" blog by Andrew Hipp of the Morton Arboretum

self-described as: "This is an occasional log of observations by the Plant Systematist on his daily ride through the Morton Arboretum's East Woods and walks elsewhere in the Chicago region. It is not fact-checked, nor is it intended to edify the reader. It is riddled with half-thought-through ideas, some of which will be revisited, some of which will not. I hope you enjoy it all the same."

example:

"Kelly green basal leaves of Epilobium are scattered throughout the woods, along with the first leaves of what seem to be Enemion biternatum, though they seem a bit ill-formed for this species, and perhaps too the first leaves of Virginia waterleaf. I should know the seedlings better; not knowing them makes me doubt that I really know the adults as well as I thought I did. At times like this, I sometimes think of a story I believe Tom Brown told, in which his teacher ordered him to go study the birds. Tom responded, as I recall, that he knew birds about as anyone could, to which his teacher asked him how many spots he might find on a Robin’s back. Which makes me wonder whether I’m remembering the story right… are there any spots on a robin’s back?"

follow/subscribe: http://systematics.mortonarb.org/phenology/

Ingresado el 12 de marzo de 2018 por bouteloua bouteloua | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario