14 de septiembre de 2023

Ohio Gall Meetup Reminder/Update

I apologize for the lack of communication on this as we now are super close to the date, and this will now be last minute for most folks (unless you already had it on your calendar).

I am planning to be at Pastime park in Plain City at 1pm on Saturday (16th), specifically at the parking lot that is pinned in the in the following map (its kind of a big place):
https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1w1XrAwE8Xkc1i-r-L8Ef7eAYa52iKZU&usp=sharing

The destinations on the map are probably overly ambitious but we will try for at least

  1. Pastime Park
  2. Smith Cemetery Prairie
  3. Westwood Memorial Park
  4. Battelle Darby Creek Metropark (near the pin on the map)

tagging those interested on the original post and the more detailed one.
@cladonia_chris @edisoncigany @lo-am @whateverwatcher @srmyers @rcurtis @bunnymom20 @kristendiesburg @darth_schrader

We will hunt for some galls, and I will likely do a little bit of gall education along the way as well (biology/ecology and identification tips). Bring any burning gall questions that you may have!

Publicado el septiembre 14, 2023 10:01 TARDE por calconey calconey | 5 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21 de junio de 2023

Ohio Gall Meetup Details

Hi all,
I got enough responses from the last post I think it will be worth setting something up here. We are from all corners of the state, so I am thinking to meet roughly in the middle this time, as I suggested in the other post in the Darby Plains area of Madison/Union/Franklin county.
Here is some natural history of the area, if anyone is interested:
http://images.library.wisc.edu/EcoNatRes/EFacs/NAPC/NAPC06/reference/econatres.napc06.cking.pdf
https://images.library.wisc.edu/EcoNatRes/EFacs/NAPC/NAPC09/reference/econatres.napc09.jknoop.pdf

Basically I am thinking of a couple of prime gall spots and possibly a couple of prairie remnants later in the day if anyone would be interested in that (lots of galls there too, some found very rarely elsewhere).

I am thinking September 16, 2023, starting at ~1:00pm (open to other suggestions on time and date, trying to be late enough to include people, but early enough that most galls will still be around). I am thinking the first stop will be Pastime Park in Plain City OH, a very nice oak and hackberry spot.

Stops may include, depending on timing/interest, most of these are within 15-20 minutes of each other:
Pastime Park, Plain City, OH - white/bur/post oak and hackberry
Westwood Park, West Jefferson, OH - the best post oak gall site in the state
Batelle-Darby Creek Metropark, Georgesville, OH - oaks and hickories
Pearl King Prairie State Nature Preserve - Rosedale, OH - If I can get a permit
Smith Cemetary Prairie SNP - Plain City, OH
Milford Center Prairie SNP - Milford Center, OH
Bigelow Prairie SNP - Chuckery, OH
Map with pins:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1w1XrAwE8Xkc1i-r-L8Ef7eAYa52iKZU&usp=sharing

Open to suggestions here as well, if anyone thinks there would be a better spot for gall or centrality reasons, or if there is a site in this area that everyone is interested in visiting.

Feel free to invite anyone who may be interested, this will be open to all. Open to people from other states as well, if you happen to be in the area or want to make the trip. Are there any suggestions for making an event invite that I can share? Is a Facebook or Google Calendar event still the easiest/best way to that or is there something better?

@cladonia_chris @edisoncigany @erin2003 @lo-am @schurchin @whateverwatcher
@chelsealynne @rogue_biologist @srmyers @rcurtis @bunnymom20 @greenscenery @kristendiesburg

Edison, I will make up a little flyer that you can share with your clubs, once I am 100% on the details.

Best,
Tim

Publicado el junio 21, 2023 03:56 TARDE por calconey calconey | 7 comentarios | Deja un comentario

15 de junio de 2023

Ohio Gall Meetup

Hello all,
Just wanted to gauge if there would be any interest in meeting up and hunting some galls together. I am thinking a fall time frame (maybe early September)... in a central-ish location (perhaps some post oak sites in central Ohio).. I realize this wont be convenient for everyone... and if those that are interested are all in one corner of the state I am open to other suggestions.

Tagging people who are on the ohio gall leaderboards
@kemper @cladonia_chris @edisoncigany @erin2003 @leezeca @lo-am @schurchin @whateverwatcher
@chelsealynne @rogue_biologist @srmyers @rcurtis @bwhiteley @maryehunt @mmnat @bunnymom20 @greenscenery @kristendiesburg @argentacer @emerlee

I have already hunted with a few people on this list and always have a great time. Feel free to tag others who may be interested.

Let me know in a comment or DM if this is something you might be interested in.

Best,
Tim

Publicado el junio 15, 2023 04:27 TARDE por calconey calconey | 11 comentarios | Deja un comentario

12 de abril de 2023

Ohio Gall Checklist Spring 2023 Update

Ohio Gall Checklist
Ohio Gall checklist updated for spring 2023. Many updates to taxonomy, and formatting.

Most of these should now be roughly in the format of:
Gall former scientific name – Host scientific name – Rarity (and sometimes distribution) – seasonality (usually of first appearance), plant organ.
Key for the distribution/rarity terms used (these are all based on personal experience, and are updated at least:

  • Widespread – should be in most counties
  • Common – should be found at most sites with a significant population of the host
  • Uncommon – Found occasionally (maybe ~10%) of sites with a significant host population
  • Rare – Found at only one or two sites that I have observed
    For the most part, these refer to the distribution of a given species over the whole state, but some species may be very common at a single site.
    If you want to see pictures of a given gall, I recommend searching for the name on gallformers.org, that site also contains many more specific details for each species.

There are two parts to this list:

  1. Galls confirmed by myself or another reliable observer to be in Ohio.
  2. Galls that could theoretically be in Ohio based on the presence of their host (but unconfirmed).

1. Known Ohio Gall Checklist (455 species):
Gall Wasps
Acraspis erinacei – Quercus alba (Q alba) – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Acraspis gemula – white oaks – uncommon – spring, buds
Acraspis pezomachoides – Q alba – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Acraspis prinoides – Q muehlenbergii –uncommon – summer-fall, leaves, more common in W half of state.
Acraspis quercushirta – Q macrocarpa, Q muehlenbergii, Q montana – widespread, common, summer, leaves
Acraspis villosa – Q macrocarpa – widespread, common – summer-fall, leaves
Amphibolips acuminata – Q imbricaria – uncommon – late spring, buds/stems
Amphibolips confluenta – Red oaks – widespread, common – late spring, buds
Amphibolips cookii – Q rubra, Q velutina – widespread, uncommon – late summer-fall, buds
Amphibolips ellipsodalis – Q coccinea, Q imbricaria, Q palustris, Q velutina – uncommon – spring, buds, in NE Ohio most frequently seen on Q imbricaria and Q velutina
Amphibolips globus – Q imbricaria, Q palustris – uncommon, late spring-early summer, buds, wetlands, in NE Ohio most common on Q palustris
Amphibolips nubilipennis – Q coccinea, Q imbricaria, Q rubra, Q velutina – uncommon – late spring, leaves
Amphibolips quercusinanis – Q rubra – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Amphibolips quercusjuglans – red oaks – widespread, uncommon – summer, acorns, on ground under trees
Amphibolips quercusostensackenii – Q coccinea, Q palustris, Q rubra, Q velutina – widespread, common – spring, dried galls through summer/fall, leaves
Amphibolips quercusrugosa – Q coccinea, Q imbricaria, Q rubra – rare, spring, leaves
Andricus apiarium - q alba - rare - fall, leaves
Andricus biconicus – Q stellata – locally common on host, Madison county presumably south to Adams county – late summer/fall - buds
Andricus capillatus – Q alba – uncommon? – late summer, leaves
Andricus chinquapin – White oaks – uncommon – spring, leaves
Andricus comata – Q alba – common? – spring, leaves
Andricus coronus – Q palustris – very rare – early spring, buds
Andricus deciduatus – Q alba, Q bicolor - rare, late summer/fall, weak lateral buds
Andricus dimorphus – white oaks – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Andricus foliaformis – Q macrocarpa – rare – spring, leaves, Common at Daughmer Savannah
Andricus incertus – Q macrocarpa – rare – summer, acorns
Andricus quercusfrondosus – white oaks – uncommon, more common as you move west and south, spring/summer, buds
Andricus quercuspetiolicola – white oaks – widespread, somewhat common – spring/summer, leaves
Andricus quercusstrobilanus – Q alba, Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, buds/stems, in NE Ohio most common on Q bicolor
Andricus mamillaformis – white oaks – uncommon-rare – late summer/fall, buds, in NE Ohio most frequently encountered on Q alba
Andricus nigricens – Q bicolor – uncommon – mid-summer, leaves
Andricus pisiformis – Q alba, Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa, Q stellata – uncommon – early spring, buds
Andricus quercusutriculus – white oaks – uncommon – spring, leaves
Andricus robustus – Q stellata – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves, Darby Plains, Adams County
Andricus stropus – Q stellata – locally uncommon, Southern 1/3 of state– summer/fall, buds
Andricus weldi – Q alba – locally common – summer/fall, petioles/leaf-base
Antistrophus jeanae - Silphium perfoliatum stems, patchy distribution, more likely in Native Silphium populations
Antistrophus meganae - S. terebinthinaceum stems, more likely at native sites
Antistrophus sp. S.perfoliatum stem swelling (non-terminal)
Antistrophus sp. S. terebinthinaceum leaf petioles – native prairie sites
Antistrophus sp. S terebininaceum flower head galls – native prairie remnants
Antistrophus sp. S. trifoliatum stems
Atrusca quercuscentricola – Q stellata – locally common Madison county south to Adams county – late summer/fall, leaves
Atrusca unica – Q stellata – uncommon, Madison county south to Adams county – late summer/fall, leaves
Aulacidea podagrae - Lactuca sp. - uncommon – stem nodes, late summer
Aulacidea sp. – Lactuca sp. – common -- Cryptic stem galls, late summer, a few species may be host specific, TBD
Aulacidea tumida - Lactuca sp. – uncommon – stem swelling, late summer,
Bassettia flavipes – Q macrocarpa – widespread, uncommon – spring, leaves
Callirhytis balanacea – Q imbricaria, Q palustris, Q rubra, Q velutina – Uncommon, late spring/summer – in NE Ohio, most common on pin oak
Callirhytis balanoides – Q balanoides – rare, late spring, early summer
Callirhytis bipapillata – Q coccinea, Q imbricaria – rare, leaves, spring – more common in the southern part of the state
Callirhytis clavula – Q alba – uncommon – fresh in late spring/summer, galls persist throughout year, stems
Callirhytis confusa – Q imbricaria – rare – spring, leaves
Callirhytis excavata – Q imbricaria, Q rubra, Q velutina – rare – stems
Callirhytis exigua – Q alba, Q stellata– rare, only observed in Washington county – spring, flowers
Callirhytis furva –red oaks – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves – In NE Ohio, most common on Q palustris, Q imbricaria
Callirhytis gallaestriatae – Q coccinea, Q palustris, Q velutina – uncommon – early spring, stems
Callirhytis glandulus - white oaks - uncommon - summer, fruits
Callirhytis glomerosa - red oaks – rare – observed in the oak openings region in NW Ohio
Callirhytis hopkinsi – Q imbricaria - rare
Callirhytis lanata – red oaks – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves – In NE Ohio by far most common on Q rubra
Callirhytis medularis - red oaks, esp pin oak – common, small twigs, most visible in winter
Callirhytis nigrae – Q imbricaria – rare? – late spring?, leaves
Callirhytis quercuscornigera – red oaks – widespread, common – fresh in spring, persist through the year, stems – heaviest infestations usually on Q imbricaria
Callirhytis quercusfutilis – white oaks – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Callirhytis quercusgemmaria – red oaks – rare – late spring, stems
Callirhytis quercusoperator – red oaks – rare – spring, flowers
Callirhytis quercuspunctata – red oaks - ? - stems
Callirhytis quercusventricosa – red oaks – rare – spring, stems, in NE Ohio by far most commonly found on Q imbricaria
Callirhytis parva – Q imbricaria – rare – spring, flowers
Callirhytis pedunculata – Q coccinea, Q rubra, Q velutina - rare? – spring, leaves
Callirhytis piperoides – Q coccinea, Q rubra, Q velutina – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Callirhytis pulchra – Q coccinea, Q rubra, Q velutina – rare? – spring, flowers
Callirhytis rugulosa – Q coccinea, Q rubra, Q velutina – rare, spring, buds
Callirhytis scitula – Q imbricaria, Q velutina - Uncommon – late spring/summer, stems
Callirhytis seminator – Q alba, Q montana – widespread, uncommon – spring, dried galls persist through summer, stems
Diastrophus cuscutaeformis – Native Rubus sp – Uncommon – Summer persisting through winter, stems
Diastrophus nebulosus – Native Rubus sp – uncommon - Summer persist through year, stems
Diastrophus potentillae - Potentilla canadensis, P. simplex – uncommon, summer and persisting into winter
Diplolepis bicolor – Native Rosa sp. – rare, late spring, stems/leaves, seen most commonly on Rosa palustris
Diplolepis dichlocera – Native Rosa sp. – uncommon, persist through year, stems
Diplolepis nebulosa – Native Rosa sp. – rare, leaves
Diplolepis polita – Native Rosa sp. – rare – late spring, leaves, seen most commonly on Rosa carolina
Diploleips rosae – cultivated European Rosa sp. – becoming rare – spring/summer, stems, most frequently found in old established plantings
Diplolepis triforma – Native Rosa sp. – common, easiest to observe in winter, stems, most commonly on Rosa palustris
Diplolepis rosaefolii – Rosa sp. - uncommon - summer
Disholcaspis globosa – Q alba, Q montana - uncommon – summer/fall, lower stems close to ground, more common in SE Ohio
Disholcaspis quercusglobulus – Q alba, Q montana, Q stellata – widespread, common – summer/fall, persisting, stems
Disholcaspis quercusmamma – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa, Q muehlenbergii – widespread, common – summer/fall, persisting, stems
Druon ignotum – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa, Q stellata – uncommon – summer, leaves
Druon pattoni – Q stellata – Southern 3rd of state, common where host is common – late summer/fall, leaves
Druon quercusflocci – Q alba – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, leaves
Dryocosmus albidus – Q coccinea, Q palustris, Q velutina – locally uncommon, very scattered distribution – early summer, leaves
Dryocosmus cinerea – red oaks– uncommon – spring, leaves – In NE Ohio most common on Q rubra
Dryocosmus floridensis – red oaks – locally common – spring, stems – In NE Ohio most common on Q imbricaria
Dryocosmus kuriphilus – native and cultivated Castanea sp. – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Dryocosmus quercusnotha - red oaks– common – spring, leaves – in NE common on Q imbricaria and Q palustris,
Dryocosmus quercuspalustris – red oaks – widespread, common – spring, leaves, in NE Ohio most common on Q palustris
Hemadas nubilipennis – native Vaccinium sp. – common in NE Ohio surrounding bogs/fens, rare elsewhere – summer/fall, stems
Kokkocynips decidua – red oaks – uncommon, late summer/fall, leaves, in NE Ohio most common on Q rubra
Kokkocynips imbricariae – red oaks – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, stems, in NE Ohio most common on Q rubra
Kokkocynips rileyi – shingle oak, black oak other red oaks – widespread, common – late spring-fall, leaves, in NE ohio most common on Q imbricaria, Q velutina
Liposthenes glechomae – Glechoma sp – widespread, uncommon – spring/summer, leaves, easy to find in most residential lawns
Loxaulus mammula – Q alba – uncommon – late spring, stems
Melikaiella ostensackeni - red oaks – widespread, uncommon – spring, leaves
Melikaiella tumifica – Q rubra, Q velutina – uncommon – spring, leaves
Neuroterus clarkeae – Q alba – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Neuroterus escharensis - q alba / q bicolor - uncommon – stems/bud scars, most visible in winter
Neuroterus floccosus – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – uncommon, summer, leaves
Neuroterus fugiens – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – spring, leaves
Neuroterus laurifoliae – Q imbricaria - uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Neuroterus minutus – Q alba, Q bicolor, Q montana – uncommon – spring, buds/leaves
Neuroterus niger – Q macrocarpa – uncommon?, spring, leaves
Neuroterus perminimus – Q alba, Q bicolor – rare? – summer, leaves
Neuroterus quercusbatatus – Q alba, Q stellata – uncommon - summer, stems
Neuroterus quercusirregularis – white oaks – uncommon – spring, leaves
Neuroterus quercusverrucarum – Q alba, Q macrocarpa, Q stellata – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Neuroterus rileyi – Q montana, Q muehlengbergii, Q stellata – uncommon, most visible in winter, stems, in Ohio most frequently observed on Q muehlenbergii
Neuroterus saltarius – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – widespread, common – late spring, persisting into summer, leaves
Neuroterus saltatorius – Q stellata – common on host, summer, leaves, Madison county south to Adams county
Neuroterus tantulus – Q alba, Q montana, Q stellata – widespread, common – late spring, persisting into summer, leaves
Neuroterus umbilicatus – white oaks – widespread, uncommon - summer/fall, leaves – In Ohio most common on Q bicolor
Neuroterus vesicula – white oaks – widespread, common – very early spring, buds – In Ohio by far most common on Q alba
Philonix fulvicollis – white oaks – widespread, common – very late spring/fall, leaves – In Ohio, most common on Q alba and Q bicolor
Phylloteras poculum – white oaks – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, leaves – In Ohio, most common on Q alba
Phylloteras prinum – Q montana - rare, summer, probably more common in parts east and south, given the distribution of the host
Phylloteras rubinum – Q alba, Q montana – uncommon – fall, leaves
Phylloteras volutellae – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – uncommon – summer/fall, leaves – In Ohio, more common in W Ohio, but found in E Ohio on Q bicolor
Sphaeroteras carolina – Q stellata – rare, Adams county – summer/fall, leaves
Zapatella quercusphellos – red oaks – uncommon – spring, stems
Zopheroteras compressum – Q coccinea, Q rubra – widespread, uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Zopheroteras hubbardi – red oaks – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves, In Ohio, most common on Q velutina
Zopheroteras guttatum – red oaks – summer/fall, leaves, In Ohio, by far most common on Q palustris
Zopheroteras sphaerula – red oaks – widespread, common – summer, leaves, In Ohio, by far most common on Q rubra
Zopheroteras cuneatum – q alba – very rare, petioles, fall, Guernsey County

Gall Midges
Acericecis ocellaris – Acer sp – widespread, common – spring, leaf spot – In Ohio most common on A rubrum
Ametrodiplosis fulvescens – Eupatorium perfoliatum – uncommon, summer, leaves
Ampelomyia viticola – Vitis sp – rare – late spring/summer, leaves
Ampelomyia vitiscoryloides – Vitis sp – uncommon – summer, stems
Ampelomyia vitispommum – Vitis sp – rare – summer, stems
Anthodiplosis eutrochii – Eutrochium sp – scattered, locally common – summer, flower buds
Asphondylia eupatorii – Ageratina altissima – widespread, common – summer/fall, stems
Asphondylia helianthiglobulus – Helianthus sp. – common in W. Ohio, not seen in NE – summer/fall, stems
Asphondylia imbricata – Symphyotrichum sp – uncommon, summer/fall, terminal bud
Asphondylia monacha – Solidago altissima – rare? – summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia ovata – Bidens sp. – uncommon, summer, stems, wetlands
Asphondylia pseudorosa – Euthamia sp – rare? – summer, buds
Asphondylia pumila – Solidago patula – uncommon, summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia ratibidae – Ratibida – uncommon, summer, flowerheads
Asphondylia rudbeckiaeconspicua – Rudbeckia lacinata – widespread, uncommon – summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia solidaginis – Solidago altissima – widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Asphondylia thalictra- Thalictrum - ?, late spring, flower heads
Asteromyia carbonifera – Solidago sp. – widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Asteromyia euthamiae – Euthamia sp. – widespread, common – late spring/fall leaves
Asteromyia modesta – various Asteraceae, commonly on fleabane – uncommon – summer, leaves
Blaesodiplosis crataegifolia – Crataegus sp. (esp crus-galli type) – locally common, more common in NE Ohio – spring, leaves
Blaesodiplosis venae – Crataegus sp – uncommon – spring, leaves
Caryadiplosis venicola – Carya sp. - rare – late spring/fall, leaves
Caryomyia albiposa – Carya sp. - spring
Caryomyia aggregata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer/fall, leaves
Caryomyia ansericollum – Carya cordiformis – common – summer/fall, leaves
Caryomyia antennata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia arcuata – Carya sp. – uncommon, summer, leaves
Caryomyia asteris – Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia biretta – Carya sp. – locally common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia caryae – Carya sp. – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia caryaecola – Carya sp. – locally common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia conoidea – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia deflexipili – Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia eumaris - Carya sp. - rare - summer, leaves
Caryomyia flaticrustum – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia glauciglobus – Carya sp. – uncommon-rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia glebosa – Carya sp. – very rare- summer, leaves, Vinton County
Caryomyia hirtidolium – Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia holotricha – Carya sp. – rare? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia lenta – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inanis – Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inclinata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inflata – Carya sp. - ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia levicrustum – Carya sp. ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia leviglobus - Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia mariginata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia ovalis – Carya sp. – rare, summer, leaves
Caryomyia persicoides – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia procumbens – Carya sp. – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia purpurea – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia recurvata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia sanguinolenta – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia spiniglobulus – Carya sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia spinulosa – Carya cordiformis – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia stellata – Carya sp. – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia striolacrustum – Carya sp. – rare, summer, leaves
Caryomyia striolata – Carya sp. – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Caryomyia subulata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia supina – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia thompsoni – Carya sp. - widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tuberculata – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tuberidolium – Carya sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tubicola – Carya sp. – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tumida – Carya sp. - ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia viscidolium - Carya sp. – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Celticecis acuminata – Celtis sp. – rare, SW Ohio – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis capsularis – Celtis laevigata – rare, summer, leaves, Clermont County
Celticecis celtiphylla – Celtis sp. – uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis conica – Celtis sp. – western ohio, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis corunata – Celtis sp. – scattered, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis expulsa – Celtis sp. – uncommon – late spring, leaves, western 2/3 of state
Celticecis ovata – Celtis sp. – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis oviformis – Celtis sp. – rare? – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis pilosa – Celtis sp. – rare, late spring/summer, leaves, Adams, Brown, Clermont counties near Ohio River
Celticecis pyriformis – Celtis sp. – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis spiniformis – Celtis sp. – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis supina – Celtis sp. - widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis wellsi – Celtis sp. – common, summer, leaves, western 2/3 of state
Contarinia cerasiserotinae – Prunus serotina - rare – spring, stems
Contarinia citrina – Tilia americana – common, summer/fall, petioles/stems
Contarinia cucumata – Carya sp. – rare – late spring, leaves
Contarinia negundidis – Acer negundo – uncommon, not sure if present in NE ohio – spring, petiole
Contarinia racemi – Prunus serotina – uncommon – spring, flower raceme
Contarinia rumicis – European Rumex sp. – common? – late spring/early summer, seed
Contarinia squamulicola – Corylus americana – uncommon, late winter, catkins
Contarinia verrucicola – Native Tilia sp – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Craneiobia tuba – Cornus sp. – rare – summer, leaves
Dasineura carbonaria – Euthamia – rare? – summer, terminal
Dasineura collinsoniae – Collinsonia canadensis – uncommon – early summer, leaves
Dasineura communis – Acer saccharum – scattered, locally common – late spring, leaves
Dasineura crataegibedeguar – Craetegus sp. – uncommon, more common in NE Ohio – late spring, leaves
Dasineura folliculi – Solidago gigantea, Solidago rugosa - uncommon
Dasineura gleditchiae – Gleditsia triacanthos – common? – spring, leaves
Dasineura investita – Laportea canadensis – widespread, locally common – very late spring/summer, leaves, stems, flowers
Dasineura involuta – Laportea canadensis – rare – summer, terminal bud
Dasineura lepidii – Lepidium sp. - ?
Dasineura meibomiifoliae – Desmodium sp - rare - Summer
Dasineura parthenocissi – Parthenocissus sp. – rare, summer
Dasineura pellex – Fraxinus sp. – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Dasineura pilosa – Laportea canadensis – rare – summer, stems, leaves
Dasineura pudibunda – Carpinus caroliniana – rare – spring, leaves, extreme NE Ohio
Dasineura salicifoliae – Spiraea alba – uncommon, summer, leaves, northern 1/3 of state
Dasineura serrulatae – Alnus sp. – uncommon – winter/early spring, bud gall, NE Ohio wetlands
Dasineura tumidosae – Fraxinus sp. – rare (in my experience) – spring, leaves, petiole
Dasineura ulmae – Ulmus americana – rare – summer, buds
Gliaspilota glutinosa – Carya sp. – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaf spot
Harmandiola helena – Populus grandidentata/tremuloides – uncommon, summer, leaves, northern 2/3 of the state
Iteomyia salicisverruca – Salix sp. – uncommon, summer, leaves, wetlands
Janetiella ulmii – Ulmus sp – uncommon, summer, leaves
Lasioptera collinsonifolia – Collinsonia sp. - ? – late spring/summer, leaves
Lasioptera cylindrigallae – Euthamia
Lasioptera lorrainae – Pycnanthemum sp. – rare, summer, stems
Lasioptera solani – Solanum carolinense – rare, summer, stems
Macrodiplosis erubescens – red oaks – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis majalis – red oaks – locally common – spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis nivepella – oaks – locally common - early spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis qoruca – Q velutina - ? – spring, leaves
Meunieriella sp – Smilax – uncommon – summer, leaves
Neolasioptera ambrosiae – Ambrosia sp. – rare? – summer, stems
Neolasioptera asclepiae – Asclepias – rare? Never personally observed - ?, stems
Neolasioptera boehmeriae – Boehmeria sp. – uncommon – summer,stems
Neolasioptera clematidis – Clematis sp. – uncommon? – summer, stems
Neolasioptera cornicola – Cornus sp. - common, stems, wetlands
Neolasioptera convolvuli – Calystegia sp. – summer, stems, persist through winter
Neolasioptera eupatorii – Ageratina altissima – uncommon? (not personally seen) – summer/fall, stems
Neolasioptera farinosa – Rubus sp. – uncommon – summer, leaves
Neolasioptera impatientifolia – Impatiens sp. – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves-stems
Neolasioptera linderae – Lindera benzoin - uncommon, most visible in winter, stems, Mohican State Park
Neolasioptera lycopi – Lycopus sp. - summer
Neolasioptera monardi – Monarda fistulosa -
Neolasioptera nodulosa – Rubus – uncommon, stems, most visible in winter
Neolasioptera perfoliata – Eupatorium sp. – uncommon – summer, stems
Neolasioptera truncata – Pycnanthemum sp. - ?, stems
Neolasioptera verbesinae – Verbesina sp. – widespread, common – summer, stems, leaf axils
Neolasioptera vernoniae – Vernonia sp. – widespread, common – summer, leaves, stems
Neolasioptera vitinea – Vitis sp. – uncommon – summer, stems
Obolodiplosis robiniae – Robinia pseudoacacia – uncommon, summer, leaves
Parallelodiplosis subtruncata – Cornus sp. – uncommon – summer, leaf spot
Peracecis fugitiva – Celtis sp. – uncommon, W Ohio – summer, leaves
Pilodiplosis helianthibula – Helianthus sp. - western ohio, common in prairie areas – early summer, leaves
Polystepha americana – red oaks - ?, summer, leaf veins
Polystepha globosa – red oaks – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Polystepha pilulae – red oaks – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Polystepha podagrae – red oaks - ? – summer, leaf veins
Polystepha quercifolia – red oaks – uncommon – spring-fall, leaves
Rabdophaga ridigae – Salix sp. – widespread, uncommon – fresh galls early summer, persistant throughout year, stems
Rabdophaga salicisbatatus – Salix sp. – uncommon, summer persistent throughout year, stems
Rabdophaga salicisbrassicoides – Salix sp. – Uncommon, summer, buds, wetlands, Erie County
Rabdophaga salicisgnaphalioides – Salix sp. – uncommon, buds
Rabdophaga salicistriticoides – Salix cordata, Salix humilis – rare, summer, stems
Rabdophaga strobiloides – Salix sp. - widespread, common – fresh galls early summer, persistent throughout year, terminal bud
Resseliella clavula – Cornus racemosa, other cornus – rare, late spring, stems, native prairie sites
Resseliella globosa – Acalypha rhomboidea – uncommon – early summer, stems
Resseliella liriodendri – Liriodendron tulipifera – widespread, common – summer, fall, leaves
Resseliella tulipiferae – Liriodendron tulipifera - summer, leaves
Rhopalomyia anthophila – Solidago altissima – Uncommon – late summer, flowers
Rhopalomyia capitata – Solidago canadensis, S gigantea, S leavenworthii – common – summer, terminal bud
Rhopalomyia clarkei – Solidago rugosa, S. altissima - NE corner of the state
Rhopalomyia fusiformae – Euthamia sp. – uncommon – summer, multiple plant parts
Rhopalomyia hirtipes - Solidago junacea - ? never personally seen, summer, terminal bud
Rhopalomyia pedicellata – Euthamia sp. – uncommon – summer, multiple plant parts
Rhopalomyia solidaginis – Solidago altissima, S canadensis, S rugosa – widespread, common – summer, terminal bud
Taxodiomyia cupressiananassa – Taxodium sp. – more common as you move southwest, very common in Cincinnati – summer/fall, leaves
Sackenomyia commota – Viburnum dentatum, Viburnum lentago – uncommon, late spring/summer, leaves
Schizomyia eupatoriflorae – Ageratina altissima – widespread, uncommon – late summer, flowers
Schizomyia impatientis – Impatiens sp. – widespread, uncommon – summer, flowers
Schizomyia racemicola – Solidago sp. – common – summer, flowers
Schizomyia verbesinae – Verbesina sp. – uncommon – summer, flowers
Vitisiella brevicauda – Vitis sp. – uncommon – late spring/summer, stems, leaves, tendrils

Gall Mites
Acalitus ferrugineum – Fagus americana – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria campestricola – Ulmus sp. – common? – spring, leaves
Aceria caryae – Carya sp. – common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria caulis – Juglans nigra – widespread, common – early summer, petiole
Aceria celtis – Celtis sp. – widespread, common – throughout year, witches broom
Aceria cephalanthi – Cephalanthus sp.– uncommon – early summer, leaves
Aceria cinereae – Juglans cinerea– common on host, but host is uncommon – early summer leaves
Aceria dina – Nyssa sylvatica – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria elongata – Acer saccharum – rare? More common north and east – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria fraxini – Fraxinus sp. – widespread, common – spring/summer - leaves
Aceria fraxiniflora – Fraxinus sp. – uncommon – spring, flowers
Aceria major – Acer rubrum – common, but rarer than other maple erineum mites – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria modesta – Acer saccharum – common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria mori – Morus sp. – uncommon – throughout year, witches broom
Aceria negundi – Acer negundo – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria nyssae – Nyssa sylvatica – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria parulmi – Ulmus sp. – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria parapopuli – Populus - ? never personally observed - ?
Aceria querci – Q macrocarpa - widespread, common – Late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria spicati - Mountain maple – rare, summer, leaves, Mohican State Park
Aceria theospyri – Diospyros virginiana – common on persimmon but the tree is rare – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria trinema – red oaks– widespread, common – most visible mid-spring, leaves – by far most common in Ohio on Q palustris
Aceria triplacis – Q alba – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria vaga – Carya sp. – uncommon? – late spring/summer - leaves
Aculops aenigma – Salix sp. – uncommon? – late spring?/Summer?, Flower buds
Aculops euphorbicolus - Euphorbia corrolata - ?, probably more common in the Western part of the state where the host is more common
Aculops rhois – Toxicodendron sp. - widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aculus minutissimus – Acer rubrum – rare, I have only seen in NE ohio – spring/summer, leaves
Aculus tetranothrix – Salix sp – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Cenalox nyssae – Nyssa sylvatica – uncommon? – late spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes aceris – Acer saccharinum – uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes cerasicrumena – Prunus serotina – widespread, common – early spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes emarginatae – Prunus americana other native Prunus (not Prunus serotina) – widespread, common – very early spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes laevis – Alnus sp. – uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes leiosoma – European Tilia sp. - Common – spring, leaves
Eriophyes pyri – Cultivated Pyrus sp. - common – spring, leaves
Eriophyes rhoinus – Toxicodendron sp. – uncommon, summer, flowers
Eriophyes tiliae – Native and European Tilia sp. – widespread, common, spring/summer, leaves
Epitrimerus marginemtorquens – Cultivated Pyrus sp. – common - spring/summer, leaves
Phyllocoptes didelphis – Populus grandidentata, tremuloides – uncommon, summer, leaves
Vasates aceriscrumena – Acer saccharum – widespread, common – early spring, summer, persisting into fall, leaves
Vasates quadripedes – Acer rubrum – widespread, common – early spring/summer, leaves

Hemipterans
Adelges abietis – Abies sp., native and non-native species – uncommon - ?, stems
Colopha ulmicola – Ulmus sp. – widespread, common – spring/early summer - leaves
Daktulosphaira vitifoliae – Vitis sp. – widespread, common – very late spring/summer - leaves
Eriosoma americanum – Ulmus sp. – uncommon – spring/early summer - leaves
Hamamelistes spinosus – Native Hamamelis sp, Betula sp. – uncommon, most common in Ohio on river birch – spring/summer - leaves
Hormaphis hamamelidis – Hamamelis sp. – widespread, common – spring/summer leaves
Kaltenbachiella ulmifusa – Ulmus rubra -late spring, summer, leaves
Melaphis rhois – Rhus sp. - widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves/petiole
Mordwilkoja vagabunda – Populus deltoides - rare? – spring, terminal bud
Pachypappa pseudobrysa – Populus deltoides – uncommon, early summer, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisgemma – Celtis sp. – uncommon, stems
Pachypsylla celtidisinteneris – Celtis sp. – Uncommon - ?, stems
Pachypsylla celtidismama – Celtis sp. - widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisumbilicus – Celtis sp. – Western Ohio, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisvesicula – Celtis sp. – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Pachypsylla venusta – Celtis sp. – widespread, common – late spring/summer, petiole
Pemphigus longicornus – Populus deltoides – rare, early summer, leaves
Pemphigus obesinymphae – Populus deltoides – summer, petiole/leafbase
Pemphigus populicaulis – Populus sp – ? – summer, leaf base/petiole
Pemphigus populiglobuli – Populus balsamifera – common on rare host, Geauga county, probably Ashtabula as well, but unconfirmed. early summer, leaf base/petiole
Pemphigus populitransversus – Populus deltoides – common – summer, petiole
Phylloxera caryaeavellana – Carya sp. - uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaecaulis - Carya sp. - uncommon - spring, leaves and petioles
Phylloxera caryaeglobuli - Carya sp. - common - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaegummosa – Carya sp. – uncommon– spring persist through summer, leaves
Phylloxera caryaefallax - Carya sp. – uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaefoliae - Carya sp. - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaemagna – Carya sp. – common, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaeren - Carya sp. - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaesemen - Carya sp. – widespread, common – very late spring/summer, leaves
Phylloxera caryaesepta - Carya sp. - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaescissa – Carya sp. – uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaevenae - Carya sp. – common, spring/summer, leaves
Phylloxera conica - Carya sp. – spring, leaves
Phylloxera flavoconica - Carya sp. - rare - spring, leaves
Phylloxera foveola - Carya sp. - uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera killianae - Carya sp. - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera notabilis - Carya sp. – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera perniciosa – Carya sp. – uncommon, spring, leaves/petioles
Phylloxera picta - Carya sp. - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera russellae – Carya sp. – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera rimosalis – Carya sp. – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera spinosa - Carya sp. – uncommon, spring, leaves, petioles
Phylloxera subelliptica – Carya sp. – spring, leaves/petioles
Phylloxera symmetrica – Carya sp. - ?, spring, leaves
Phylloxera wiedenmanni – Carya sp. - ?, spring leaves
Phylloxera williamsi – Carya sp. - ?, spring, leaves
Phylloxerina nyssa – Nyssa sylvatica – uncommon – late spring, leaves
Tetraneura nigriabdominalis – Ulmus sp. – widespread, common, late spring/summer, leaves

Fungi
Apiosporina morbosa – Prunus americana – locally common - stems
Cronartium quercuum – Pinus sp. – not personally observed - stems
Diaporthe sp. – Carya cordiformis – widespread, uncommon, but will cover entire trees where present – visible year round, stems
Gymnosporangium clavipes – Malus, Crataegus
Gymnosporangium globosum – Crataegus, Juniperus
Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae – Juniperus – Locally common – spring, stems/leaves
Taphrina caerulescens – red oaks – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Taphrina communis – native plums - ? never personally observed – spring, fruits – NE Ohio
Taphrina deformans –Cultivated peach – uncommon – spring, leaves
Taphrina farlowii – Prunus serotina – common – spring, leaves/fruits
Taphrina johansonii – Populus - ? not personally observed - ?, fruits
Taphrina populina – Populus deltoides – common – spring, leaves
Taphrina polystichi – Polystichum acrostichoides – common – spring, leaves
Taphrina tormentillae – Potentilla simplex, possibly other Potentilla – Uncommon, leaves
Taphrina ulmi – Ulmus – uncommon – spring, leaves
Taphrina virginica - Ostrya

Sawflies
Euura gracilis – Salix sericea, possibly other Salix sp. – uncommon, early summer, leaves, northern 1/3rd of state
Euura orbitalis – Salix humilis – rare?, summer, lateral buds. Springville Marsh SNP.
Euura proxima (or lookalike) – Salix alba, Salix fragilis – uncommon, early summer, leaves
Euura salicisnodus (or lookalike) – Salix interior – common, summer, persist throughout year, stems
Euura salicisovum – Salix eriocephala – uncommon, summer, stems – wetlands
Euura salicispisum – Salix discolor – uncommon, summer, leaves – wetlands
Euura salicispommum – Salix discolor, eriocephala, interior – uncommon, summer, leaves – most frequent in wetlands close to Lake Erie

Other
Agrobacterium sp. – various hosts – bacteria, uncommon, often in cultivated situations – visible year round – In Ohio I have seen on cultivated roses as well as Euonymous fortunei
Agromyza deserta – Celtis sp. – agromyzid fly – Uncommon, early summer, stems
Ampeloglypter sesostris – Vitis sp. – beetle – uncommon, summer, stems
Ecdytolopha insiticiana – Robinia pseudoacacia – moth, common, summer, stems
Ectoedemia populella – Populus grandidentata, P tremuloides – moth – Common on host – summer, petiole/leaf base
Epiblema desertana – Euthamia sp. – moth – uncommon, summer, stems
Epiblema scudderiana – Solidago sp – moth - ?, summer, stems
Epiblema strenuata – Ambrosia artemisiifolia – moth – summer, fall
Euhexomyza schineri – Populus tremuloides – Agromyzid fly - summer, stems
Eurosta solidaginis – Solidago sp. – fly, widespread, common – summer, stem
Gnorimoschema gallaeasterella – Various Asteraceae, including Eurybia, Solidago, Symphyotrichum sp – moth, stem swelling
Gnorimoschema gallaesolidaginis – Solidago sp. – moth, uncommon – summer, stem
Heliozela aesella – Vitis sp - uncommon – early summer, leaves
Smicronyx sculpticollis – Cuscuta sp. – Beetle – stems, summer
Stagmatophora sexnotella – Trichostemma sp. – moth - uncommon, summer, stems – Ashtabula county
Urophora cardui – Cirsium arvense – fly - rare, never personally observed
Walshia amorphella – Amorpha fructicosa – lepidopteran - common where host is present, summer, stems, galls persist through winter

Undescribed gall wasps
Disholcaspis sp. – Q muehlenbergii – common, summer, stems
Disholcaspis sp. – Q stellata – common, summer, stems
Q alba bead gall – common – early summer/fall, leaves
Q alba red margin spangle – uncommon- summer, leaves
Q alba rugose spangle – uncommon, summer, leaves
Q alba hairy donut – uncommon, summer, leaves
Q alba truncate petiole cluster – very rare, late summer, petioles, Ashland County
Q muehlenbergii - white midrib gall – uncommon – summer, leaves
Q velutina - yellow midrib gall – uncommon – late summer, leaves
Q stellata - "phylloteras-like" spangle – uncommon, late summer, leaves, Darby Plains
Q imbricaria “hole punch” gall – uncommon, spring, leaves, common at Killbuck Marsh SWA
Q velutina fuzzy vein globs – uncommon, fall, midribs
“Q phellos” lemon gall – on shingle oak – uncommon, spring, leaves

Undescribed gall midges
Contarinia - box elder – uncommon – spring, leaves
Contarinia sp - oak - vein gall uncommon – spring, leaves
Polystepha? - red oaks esp shingle oak and black oak - cone gall, uncommon – late summer, leaves
Polystepha shingle oak raspberry gall – uncommon, summer, leaves

2. Uncertain presence in Ohio (a to-find list)
Wasps
Amphibolips femoratus – red oaks – unlikely given known distribution
Acraspis longicornis – Q stellata
Amphibolips globulus – Q marilandica - unlikely given known distribution and rarity of host in Ohio
Amphibolips murata – Q marilandica - unlikely given known dist. and rare host
Amphibolips quercuscoelebs – Red oaks, look for on Q coccinea in SE Ohio
Amphibolips tinctoriae – look for on native scarlet oak populations, E Ohio
Andricus clarkei - Q alba, Q stellata
Andricus lustrans – Q stellata - leaves
Andricus murtfeldtae - q stellata, looks for in Adams county
Antistrophus laciniatus - Silphium lacinatum - probably unlikely, host rare in ohio, check Lawrence County pops
Antistrophus minor - S. lacinatum - unlikely, host rare, check Lawrence county pops
Antistrophus rufus - S. lacinatum - unlikely, host rare, check Lawrence county pops
Antistrophus silphii – S.integrifolium/S. lacinatum - unlikely hosts rare
Aulacidea abdita - Latuca canadensis, likely present
Aulacidea annulata - Latuca/Prenanthes, likely present
Aulacidea harringtoni - Latuca floridana, likely present
Aulacidea nabali - Nabalus
Aulacidea pilosellae - Pilosella
Biorhiza caepuliformis - red oaks
Callirhytis balanaspis – Q marilandica, Q velutina - possible record from Hamilton County
Callirhytis balanosa - red oaks
Callirhytis crypta - red oaks – likely present, non-descript stem gall
Callirhytis gemmiformis – Q alba, Q bicolor – rare – summer/fall, stems
Callirhytis electrea – Q montana – acorn interior
Callirhytis ellipsoida – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa – root gall
Callirhytis elliptica - Q alba – root gall
Callirhytis excavata – Q imbricaria, Q rubra, Q velutina – stem gall
Callirhytis florensis – Q marilandica - unlikely because of rarity of host, flower gall
Callirhytis infuscata – red oaks – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves, some things similar to the description of these has been found, but their ID is uncertain
Callirhytis lapillula – Q bicolor – acorn galls
Callirhytis marginata – Q coccinea, Q rubra - roots
Callirhytis perrugosa - q alba - roots
Callirhytis rubida – Q coccinea, Q rubra, Q velutina – root/crown gall
Callirhytis seminosa – Q palustris, Q rubra - stems
Callirhytis subcostata – Q alba, Q stellata, fruit pip gall
Callirhytis tuberosa – Q imbricara - Stem
Callirhytis tubicola – Q stellata – leaf gall
Diastrophus bassettii - Rubus flagellaria, R hispidus - roots
Diastrophus fragariae - Fragraria virginiana
Diastrophus niger - Potentilla canadensis
Diastrophus radicum - Rubus corchorifolius and R. occidentalis - roots
Diastrophus turgidus – Rubus strigosus - stems
Diplolepis fusiformans subsp. fusiformans - Rosa arkansana/Rosa blanda/Rosa woodsii - probaly unlikely hosts rare or not present in Ohio
Diplolepis gracilis – Rosa sp. - unlikely given known range
Diplolepis ignota – Native Rosa sp. - very possible have found similar things, but ID not confirmed
Diplolepis nodulosa – Native Rosa sp.
Diplolepis pustulatoides – Rosa blanda, other native roses? – Leaf gall
Diplolepis radicum - R. carolina, other native roses? - roots
Diplolepis spinosa - Native rosa sp. - stems
Diplolepis tuberculosa – Native rosa sp - stems
Disholcaspis bassetti – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa stems – given known distribution look for in NE/NW corners of the state
Disholcaspis pruniformis – Q stellata – unlikely presence given known distribution
Disholcaspis spongiosa – Q alba, Q stellata – Usually see on Q stellata, never found in OH, Adams county probably most likely area, if present at all
Disholcaspis terrestris – Q alba, Q stellata – Stems?
Dryocosmus favus – Q marilandica, Q palustris, Q rubra – stems, roots, crown
Eumayria enigma – Q rubra - roots
Eumayria floridana - red oaks - stems
Eumayria saltata – Q rubra - bud
Holocynips badia – white oaks - roots
Holocynips maxima - white oaks - roots
Loxaulus beutenmuelleri – Q rubra – leaf midrib
Loxaulus humilis – Q stellata - roots
Loxaulus illinoisensis – Q alba, Q macrocarpa - roots
Loxaulus vaccinii – Q stellata - stem
Melikaiella corrugis - red oaks - fruit
Melikaiella fructicola – Q imbricaria, Q marilandica, Q velutina - fruits
Melikaiella fructuosa - red oaks - fruits
Melikaiella papula – Q rubra, Q velutina - leaves
Neuroterus affinis - Q. prinoides, unlikely host presence in Ohio uncertain.
Neuroterus bassettii - Q alba - leaf
Neuroterus consimilis - Q alba - stem
Neuroterus contortus – Q stellata - roots
Neuroterus distortus – Q bicolor, Q montana - buds
Neuroterus exiguus – Q stellata, flower
Neuroterus gillettei – Q stellata - leaves
Neuroterus pallidus – Q bicolor, Q macrocarpa
Neuroterus papillosus – Q bicolor, Q montana - leaves
Neuroterus tectus – Q prinoides – flower cluster stems
Odontocynips nebulosa - Q stellata - roots
Philonix gigas – Q macrocarpa, Q muehlenbergii
Phylloteras nigrum – Q alba – uncertain taxonomy
Phylloteras sigma – Q alba - leaves
Sphaeroteras melleum – Q stellata - leaves
Trigonaspis polita - Q alba / Q stellata - unlikely given known geography
Trigonaspis quercusforticorne – Q macrocarpa – stems, Look for in NW Ohio
Trigonaspis radicola – Q alba, Q stellata - roots
Zapatella davisae – Q velutina - stems
Zapatella oblata – Q coccinea - bud
Zapatella quercusmedullae – Q coccinea, Q marilandica - stems

Midges
Ametrodiplosis fistulosae – Monarda fistulosae
Ametrodiplosis geminata – Pycnanthemum, midsummer
Asphondylia autumnalis – Helenium –
Asphondylia azaleae – Rhododendron –
Asphondylia diervillae – Diervilla –
Asphondylia hydrangeae – Hydrangea arborescens
Asphondylia lacinariae – Liatris pycnostachya – Look for in prairie areas, Adams County
Asphondylia recondita – Asters, rosette gall
Asphondylia rosulata – Solidago rugosa – Look for in easter 1/3 of state.
Asphondylia sambuci – Sambuccus sp -
Asphondylia smilacinae – Smilacina racemosa
Asphondylia silva – Solidago caesia –
Caryomyia caminata – Carya sp. -
Caryomyia cynipsea – Carya sp.
Caryomyia hirtiglobus - Carya sp.
Caryomyia spherica - Carya sp.
Caryomyia turbanella - Carya sp.
Caryomyia turbinata - Carya sp.
Clinodiplosis apocyni – hemp dogbane
Clinodiplosis hastata– Verbena hastata
Clinodiplosis lappa – Spiraea salicifolia – unlikely given known distribution, but look for in extreme NE corner of state
Clinodiplosis rhododendri – Rhododendron – Look for in SE corner of state
Clinodiplosis spiraeina – Spiraea alba – Look for in NE Ohio
Contarinia clarkei – Spiraea alba - Look for in NE Ohio
Contarinia juniperiana – Juniper sp. -
Contarinia nucicola – Carya sp. –
Contarinia pyrivora – Pyrus communis -
Contarinia virginianiae – Prunus virginiana -
Cystiphora canadensis – Nabalus sp. -
Dasineura americana – Galium asprellum
Dasineura anemone – Anemone canadensis
Dasineura aromaticae – Mentha arvensis, Mentha spicata
Dasineura dentatae – Castanea dentata
Dasineura johnsoni – Vitis sp
Dasineura laquerrarum – Mountain mint - spring
Dasineura lysimachiae – Lysimachia quadrifolia, terrestris
Dasineura mali – Apple
Dasineura piperitae – Mentha gentilis, Mentha piperita
Dasineura pseudacaciae – black locust
Dasineura pyri – Pyrus communis
Dasineura rhodophaga – Rosa sp (cultivated)
Dasineura sassafras – Sassafras
Dasineura semenivora – Viola sp.
Dasineura smilacifolia – Smilax spp
Dasineura toweri – Hypericum mutilum
Dasineura trifolii – Clover
Dasineura urnicola – Urtica dioica
Harmandiola stebbinsae – bigtooth aspen
Iteomyia salicifolia - willows
Janetiella asplenifolia – Comptonia peregrina – Look for in Lucas county/oak openings region
Lasioptera excavata – Crataegus sp.
Lasioptera humulicaulis – Humulus
Lasioptera lactucae – Lactuca canadensis
Lasioptera spiraeafolia – Spiraea densiflora, douglasii, salicifolia – Look for in NE Ohio
Macrodiplosis castaneae – Castanea dentata
Meunieriella aquilonia – Gleditsia triacanthos
Neolasioptera brevis – Gleditsia triacanthos
Neolasioptera desmodii – Desmodium sp
Neolasioptera erigeroni - Erigeron
Neolasioptera fontagrensis – Celastrus scandens
Neolasioptera galeosidis – Galeopsis
Neolasioptera hibisci – Hibiscus
Neolasioptera menthae – Mentha sp
Neolasioptera pierrei – Sambuccus sp
Neolasioptera rudbeckiae - Rudbeckia
Neolasioptera triadenii – Hypericum virginicum
Neolasioptera viburnicola – Viburnum dentatum
Olpodiplosis helianthi – Helianthus
Primavera porrecta – Ulmus americana - fruit
Polystepha podagrae – Quercus ilicifolia, Q velutina
Polystepha pustulata – Q rubra, Q velutina
Polystepha pustuloides – red oaks
Polystepha serrata – Q coccinea
Polystepha simpla – Q rubra, Q veluina
Polystepha sobrina – Q velutina
Prodiplosis myricae – Myrica cerifera
Prodiplosis morrisi – Populus sp.
Prodiplosis platani – Platanus occidentalis
Prodiplosis violicola – Viola spp
Rabdophaga cephalanthi – Cephalanthus occidentalis
Rabdophaga globosa – Salix erocephala
Rabdophaga racemi – Salix interior
Rabdophaga salicis – Salix viminalis
Rabdophaga saliciscornu – Salix humilis
Rabdophaga saliciscoryloides – Salix discolor, Salix humilis
Rabdophaga salicisrhodoides – Salix humilis
Rabdophaga salicisnodulus – Salix interior
Rabdophaga salicisstrobiliscus -Salix bebbiana, Salix discolor
Rabdophaga timberlakei – Salix lucida
Rabdophaga tumidosae – Salix interior
Rhopalomyia castanae – Castanea
Rhopalomyia chrysanthemi –cultivated chrysanthemums
Rhopalomyia gemmaria - asters
Rhopalomyia grossulariae – Ribes grossularia
Rhopalomyia inquisitor – Solidago gigantea
Rhopalomyia lobata – Euthamia – Look for in NE Ohio
Rhopalomyia sp. – Asters, floret gall
Rhopalomyia strobiligemma – Panicled aster
Rhopalomyia weldi – Eurybia macrophylla
Sackenomyia viburnifolia – Viburnum dentatum
Schizomyia umbellicola – Sambuccus
Schizomyia viburni – Viburnum

Mites
Acalitus brevitarsus – Alnus sp. -
Aceria dispar – Populus tremuloides
Aceria neoessigi – Populus sp.
Aceria parapopuli – Populus tremuloides
Acalitus phyllereus – Alnus sp.
Aceria kuko - Lycium
Aculus laevigatae – Salix sp.
Aculus micheneri – Salix nigra
Aculus niphocladae – Salix babylonica
Aculops ailanthii – Ailanthus sp.
Cenalox conyssae – Nyssa sp.
Colomerus vitis – Vitis sp.
Eriophyes betulae – Betula sp.
Eriophyes helicantyx - Pteridium aquilinum
Eriophyes paraviburni – Viburnum
Eriophyes semen – Salix nigra

Hemiptera
Pachypappa sacculi - Populus sp.
Pemphigus betae – balsam popular, unlikely due to rarity of host
Pemphigus monophagus – balsam popular, unlikely due to rarity of host
Pemphigus nortonii – populus deltoides
Pemphigus populiramulorum = Populus sp
Pemphigus populivenae
Pemphigus spyrothecae – European Populus sp.
Pemphigus tartareus – Populus deltoides –
Phylloxera crypta - carya - leaf
Phylloxera devastatrix - pecan - leaf
Phylloxera falsostium - carya - leaf
Phylloxera myristica - carya - leaf
Phylloxera paludis
Phylloxera pilosula - carya - leaf
Phylloxera stoetzelae - carya - leaf
Phylloxera subelliptica - carya – petiole
Tetraneura ulmi – Elms
Thecabius gravicornis – Populus balsamifera
Thecabius lysimachiae – European populus sp.
Thecabius populiconduplifolius – Populus sp.
Thecabius populimonilis – balsam poplar

Fungi
Taphrina americana - birch
Taphrina betulina - birch
Taphrina carveri – maple
Taphrina coryli - hazel
Taphrina robinsoniana – alder
Taphrina wisneri - cherry
Pear rust

Other
Agrilus politus – willows –
Caloptilia murtfeldtella – Penstemon sp. – moth
Euura bebbianae – Salix bebbiana -
Euura consors – Salix humilis – If found likely to be in northern part of state
Euura cooperae – Salix interior
Euura cosensii – Salix humilis, look for around lake Erie
Euura lucidae – Euura lucidae, if found likely to be in the northern part of the state
Euura petiolaridis – Salix petiolaris
Euura salicisdesmodioides – Salix humilis
Euura salicisovulum – Salix sp.
Euura serissimae – Salix serissimae, If found likely to be in northern part of state
Eurosta lateralis – Solidago odora – Tephritid fly
Gnorimoschema busckiella – Symphyotrichum patens- moth – stems
Gnorimoschema gibsoniella – Solidago rigida – moth – stems
Gnorimoschema jocelynae – Solidago gigantea – moth stems
Gnorimoschema salinaris – Solidago juncea, ulmifolia – moth – stems
Gnorimoschema septentrionella – asters – stems
Gnorimoschema subterranean – Symphyotrichum ericoides – moth - stems
Lixus musculus – Polygonum – beetle
Mompha rufocristatella – Oenothera gaura – lepidoptera
Mompha stellata – Oenothera biennis - lepidoptera
Pseudomonas savastanoi – Forsythia – bacteria

Publicado el abril 12, 2023 09:51 TARDE por calconey calconey | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

16 de septiembre de 2022

Ohio Gall Checklist 2022 update

Ohio Gall Checklist 2022 update
As before, I apologize in advance for sloppy editing and obnoxiously inconsistent formatting throughout.

I recommend searching for species on gallformers.org for pictures and references.

Most of the list here are species that I have personally found here in Ohio, or records by others that I trust.
Comments on rarity represent my personal experience hunting galls in Ohio over the last ~5 years (seriously in the past 3), these may change in the future as I hunt more of the infrequent/under-observed host species.

I have spent a decent amount of time on Carya, Celtis, Populus and Salix this year, so there is much updated from those hosts. More to come on the latter two in the future, they are still very under-observed especially given the number of gall species that call them home.

Another note: The undescribed section here is very incomplete, something else to work on in the future.

Gall Wasps
Acraspis erinacei – white oak – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Acraspis gemula – white oak – uncommon – spring, buds
Acraspis pezomachoides – white oak – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Acraspis prinoides – chestnut oak, chinkapin oak – uncommon – summer-fall, leaves
Acraspis quercushirta – Bur oak, Chestnut/chinkapin oak – widespread, common, summer, leaves
Acraspis villosa – bur oak – widespread, common – summer-fall, leaves
Amphibolips acuminata – shingle oak – uncommon – late spring, buds/stems
Amphibolips confluenta – Red oaks – widespread, common – late spring, buds
Amphibolips cookii – red oaks – widespread, uncommon – late summer-fall, buds
Amphibolips ellipsodalis – black oak, shingle oak – uncommon – spring, buds
Amphibolips femoratus – red oaks - ? (not personally observed)
Amphibolips globus – pin oak – uncommon, late spring-early summer, buds, wetlands
Amphibolips nublipennis – red oaks – uncommon – late spring, leaves
Amphibolips quercusinanis – red oaks – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Amphibolips quercusjuglans – red oaks – widespread, uncommon – summer, acorns, on ground under trees
Amphibolips quercusoostensackii – red oaks – widespread, common – spring, dried galls through summer/fall, leaves
Amphibolips quercusrugosa – red oaks – rare, spring, leaves
Andricus apiarium -q alba - rare - fall, leaves
Andricus biconicus – post oak – locally common on host, Madison county presumably south to Adams county – late summer/fall - buds
Andricus capillatus – white oak – uncommon? – late summer, leaves
Andricus chinquapin – white oak – uncommon – spring, leaves
Andricus comata – white oak – common? – spring, leaves
Andricus coronus – pin oak – very rare – early spring, buds
Andricus deciduuatus – q. bicolor - rare, late summer/fall, weak lateral buds
Andricus dimorphis – white oaks – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Andricus foliaformis – bur oak – rare – spring, leaves
Andricus frondosus – bur oak – uncommon, more common as you move west and south, spring/summer, buds
Andricus incertus – bur oak, swamp white oak – rare – summer, acorns
Andricus ignotus – bur oak – uncommon – summer, leaves
Andricus quercusflocci – white oak – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, leaves
Andricus quercuspeticola – white oak – widespread, somewhat common – spring/summer, leaves
Andricus quercusstrobiloides – bur oak, white oak – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, buds/stems
Andricus mamilaformis – white oak – uncommon-rare – late summer/fall, buds
Andricus nigricens – swamp white oak – uncommon – mid-summer, leaves
Andricus pattoni – post oak – Adams county, rare – late summer/fall, leaves
Andricus pisiformis – white oak – uncommon – early spring, buds
Andricus quercusutriculus – white oak – uncommon – spring, leaves
Andricus robustus – post oak – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves, Darby Plains, Adams County
Andricus stropus – post oak – locally uncommon, Madison county south to Adams county – summer/fall, buds
Andricus weldi - white oak – locally common – summer/fall, petioles/leaf-base
Antistrophus jeanae - Silphium perfoliatum stems, patchy distribution, more likely in Native S.
Antistrophus meganae - S. terebinthinaceum stems, more likely at native sites
Atrusca carolina – post oak – rare, Adams county – summer/fall, leaves
Atrusca quercuscentricola – post oak – locally common Madison county south to Adams county – late summer/fall, leaves
Atrusca unica – post oak – uncommon, Madison county south to Adams county – late summer/fall, leaves
Aulacidea podagrae - Lactuca sp. - uncommon – stem nodes, late summer
Aulacidea sp. – Lactuca sp. – common -- Cryptic stem galls, late summer, a few species may be host specific, more info to come
Aulacidea tumida - Lactuca sp. – uncommon – stem swelling, late summer,
Callirhytis balanacea – pin oak - ? late spring/summer
Callirhytis balanoides - black oak, shingle oak – rare, late spring, early summer
Callirhytis bipapillata – shingle oak – rare, leaves, spring
Callirhytis clavula – white oak – uncommon – fresh in late spring/summer, galls persist throughout year, stems
Callirhytis confusa – shingle oak – rare – spring, leaves
Callirhytis excavata – red oaks – rare - stems
Callirhytis exigua – white oak – rare, only observed in Washington county – spring, flowers
Callirhytis flavipes – bur oak – widespread, uncommon – spring, leaves
Callirhytis furva – pin oak and other red oaks – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Callirhytis gallaestriatae – pin oak – uncommon – early spring, stems
Callirhytis gemmiformis – white oak – rare – summer/fall, stems
Callirhytis glandulus - white oaks -? - summer, fruits
Callirhytis glomerosa - red oaks
Callirhytis hopkinsi - shingle oak - rare
Callirhytis infuscata – red oaks – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Callirhytis lanata – red oak – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Callirhytis medularis - red oaks, esp pin oak – common, small twigs, most visible in winter
Callirhytis nigrae – shingle oak – rare? – late spring?, leaves
Callirhytis quercuscornigera – red oaks – widespread, common – fresh in spring, persist through the year, stems
Callirhytis quercusfutilis – white oak, swamp white oak – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Callirhytis quercusgemmaria – red oaks – rare – late spring, stems
Callirhytis quercusoperator – red oak – rare – spring, flowers
Callirhytis quercuspunctata – red oaks - ? - stems
Callirhytis quercusventricosa – red oaks , esp shingle oak – rare – spring, stems
Callirhytis parva – shingle oak – rare? – spring, flowers
Callirhytis pedunculata – red oaks - rare? – spring, leaves
Callirhytis piperoides – red oaks – ? never personally observed – late summer/fall, leaves
Callirhytis pulchra – red oak – rare? – spring, flowers
Callirhytis rugulosa – red oaks – rare, spring, buds
Callirhytis scitula – shingle oak - ? – late spring/summer, stems
Callirhytis seminator – white oak – widespread, uncommon – spring, dried galls persist through summer, stems
Diastrophus cuscutaeformis – rubus – rare (never personally seen) - ?, stems
Diastrophus nebulosus – rubus – uncommon - ? persist through year, stems
Diastrophus potentillae - Potentilla canadensis/ P. simplex – uncommon, summer and persisting into winter
Diplolepis bicolor – native rose – rare, late spring, stems/leaves
Diplolepis dichlocera – native rose – uncommon, persist through year, stems
Diplolepis nervosa – native rose – rare – spring, leaves
Diplolepis polita – native rose – rare – late spring, leaves/stems
Diploleips rosae – cultivated European roses – becoming rare – spring/summer, stems
Diplolepis triforma – native rose – common, easiest to observe in winter, stems
Diplolepis rosaefolii – Rosa sp. - uncommon - summer
Disholcaspis globosa - chestnut oak - ? probably more common in SE Ohio – summer/fall, lower stems close to ground
Disholcaspis pruniformis – post oak – Rare? Presumably Madison county south to Adams county – summer, stems
Disholcaspis quercusglobulus – white oak, chestnut oak – widespread, common – summer/fall, persisting, stems
Disholcaspis quercusmama – bur oak, swamp white oak – widespread, common – summer/fall, persisting, stems
Dryocosmus albidus – red oaks – locally uncommon – early summer, leaves
Dryocosmus cinerea – red oaks esp Quercus rubra – uncommon – spring, leaves
Dryocosmus floridensis – red oaks, especially shingle oak – locally common – spring, stems
Dryocosmus kuriphilus – native and cultivated chestnuts – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Dryocosmus quercusnotha - red oaks esp shingle oak and pin oak – common – spring, leaves
Dryocosmus quercuspalustris – pin oak and other red oaks – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Hemadas nubilipennis – blueberry – common in NE Ohio surrounding bogs/fens – summer/fall, stems
Kokkocynips decidua – red oaks – uncommon, late summer/fall, leaves
Kokkocynips imbricariae – red oaks – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, stems
Kokkocynips rileyi – shingle oak, black oak other red oaks – widespread, common – late spring-fall, leaves
Liposthenes glechomae – Ground Ivy (Glechoma) – widespread, uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Loxaulus mammula – white oak – uncommon – late spring, stems
Melikaiella ostensackeni - red oaks – widespread, uncommon – spring, leaves
Melikaiella tumifica – red oak – uncommon – spring, leaves
Neuroterus clarkeae – white oak – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Neuroterus escharensis - q alba / q bicolor - ? – stems/bud scars, most visible in winter
Neuroterus floccosus – white oaks – summer, leaves
Neuroterus fugiens – white oaks – spring, leaves
Neuroterus laurifoliae - shingle oak - ? – late summer/fall, leaves
Neuroterus minutus – white oak – uncommon – spring, buds/leaves
Neuroterus niger - white oaks – uncommon?, summer, leaves
Neuroterus perminimus – white oak – rare? – summer, leaves
Neuroterus quercusbatatus – white oak – uncommon - ?, summer, stems
Neuroterus quercusirregularis – white oaks – uncommon – spring, leaves
Neuroterus quercusverrucarum – bur oak – widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Neuroterus rileyi - post oak /chestnut oak, chinquapin oak – uncommon, most visible in winter, stems
Neuroterus saltarius – bur oak, swamp white oak – widespread, common – late spring, persisting into summer, leaves
Neuroterus saltatorius – post oak – uncommon, summer, leaves, Madison county south to Adams county
Neuroterus tantalus – white oak – widespread, common – late spring, persisting into summer, leaves
Neuroterus umbilicatus – white oak – widespread, uncommon - summer/fall, leaves
Neuroterus vesicula – white oak – widespread, common – very early spring, buds
Philonix fulvicollis – white oaks – widespread, common – very late spring/fall, leaves
Phylloteras nigrum – white oaks – uncommon – fall, leaves
Phylloteras poculum – white oak – widespread, uncommon – summer/fall, leaves
Phylloteras prinum - chestnut oak - rare, summer, probably more common in parts east and south, given the distribution of the host
Phylloteras rubinum – white oak – uncommon – fall, leaves
Phylloteras volutellae - bur oak – uncommon, western ohio (probably Crawford county and west) – summer/fall, leaves
Zapatella quercusphellos – shingle oak – uncommon – spring, stems
Zopheroteras compressum – red oak – widespread, uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Zopheroteras hubbardi – red oaks esp black oak – uncommon – late summer/fall, leaves
Zopheroteras guttatum – red oaks esp pin oak, widespread, common – summer/fall, leaves
Zopheroteras sphaerula – red oaks, esp q. rubra – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Zopheroteras cuneatum – q alba – very rare, petioles, fall, Guernsey County

Gall Midges
Acericecis ocellaris – maples, esp red maple – widespread, common – spring, leaf spot
Ametrodiplosis fulvescens – Eupatorium perfoliatum – uncommon, summer, leaves
Ampelomyia viticola – grapes – rare – late spring/summer, leaves
Ampelomyia vitiscoryloides – grapes – uncommon – summer, stems
Ampelomyia vitispommum – grapes – rare – summer, stems
Anthodiplosis eutrochii – joe pye weed – scattered, locally common – summer, flower buds
Asphondylia eupatorii – Ageratina – widespread, common – summer/fall, stems
Asphondylia helianthiglobulus – sunflower – common in W. Ohio, not seen in NE – summer/fall, stems
Ashondylia imbricata – asters – uncommon, summer/fall, terminal bud
Asphondylia monacha – Solidago – rare? – summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia ovata – Bidens sp. – uncommon, summer, stems, wetlands
Asphondylia pseudorosa – Euthamia – rare? – summer, buds
Asphondylia pumila – Solidago patula – uncommon, summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia ratibidae – Ratibida – uncommon, summer, flowerheads
Asphondylia rudbeckiaeconspicua – rudbeckia lacinata – widespread, uncommon – summer, terminal bud
Asphondylia solidaginis – solidago – widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Asphondylia thalictra- Thalictrum - ?, late spring, flower heads
Asteromyia carbonifera – Solidago – widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Asteromyia euthamiae – Euthamia – widespread, common – late spring/fall leaves
Asteromyia modesta – various Asteraceae, commonly on fleabane – uncommon – summer, leaves
Blaesodiplosis crataegifolia – hawthorn (esp crus-galli type) – locally common, more common in NE Ohio – spring, leaves
Blaesodiplosis venae – hawthorn – uncommon – spring, leaves
Caryadiplosis venicola – carya – rare – late spring/fall, leaves
Caryomyia albiposa – Carya - spring
Caryomyia aggregata – carya – uncommon – summer/fall, leaves
Caryomyia ansericollum – bitternut hickory – common – summer/fall, leaves
Caryomyia antennata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia arcuata – Carya – uncommon, summer, leaves
Caryomyia asteris – carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia biretta – carya – locally common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia caryae – carya – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia caryaecola – carya – locally common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia conoidea – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia deflexipili – carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia eumaris - carya - rare - summer, leaves
Caryomyia flaticrustum – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia glauciglobus – carya – uncommon-rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia glebosa – Carya – very rare- summer, leaves, Vinton County
Caryomyia hirtidolium – carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia holotricha – carya – rare? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia lenta – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inanis – carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inclinata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia inflata – carya - ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia levicrustum – carya - ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia leviglobus carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia mariginata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia ovalis – Carya – rare, summer, leaves
Caryomyia persicoides – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia procumbens – carya – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia purpurea – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia recurvata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia sanguinolenta – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia spiniglobulus – carya – rare – summer, leaves
Caryomyia spinulosa – bitternut – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia stellata – carya – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia striolacrustum – Carya – rare, summer, leaves
Caryomyia striolata – carya – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Caryomyia subulata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia supina – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia thompsoni – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tuberculata – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tuberidolium – carya – uncommon – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tubicola – Carya – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Caryomyia tumida – carya - ? – summer, leaves
Caryomyia viscidolium – carya – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Celticecis acuminata – celtis – rare, SW Ohio – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis capsularis – Celtis laevigata – rare, summer, leaves, Clermont County
Celticecis celtiphylla – celtis – uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis conica – celtis – western ohio, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis corunata – celtis – scattered, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis expulsa – celtis – uncommon – late spring, leaves, western 2/3 of state
Celticecis ovata – celtis – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis oviformis – celtis – rare? – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis pilosa – Celtis – rare, late spring/summer, leaves, Adams, Brown, Clermont counties near Ohio River
Celticecis pyriformis – celtis – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis spiniformis – Celtis – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis supina – celtis, widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Celticecis wellsi – Celtis – common, summer, leaves, western 2/3 of state
Clinodiplosis meibomiifoliae – tick trefoil - ? - Summer
Contarinia cerasiserotinae – black cherry - ? never personally observed – spring, stems
Contarinia citrina – Tilia americana – common, summer/fall, petioles/stems
Contarinia cucumata – carya – rare? – late spring, leaves
Contarinia negundidis – box elder – uncommon, not sure if present in NE ohio – spring, petiole
Contarinia racemi – black cherry – uncommon – spring, flower raceme
Contarinia rumicis – European rumex sp – common? – late spring/early summer, seed
Contarinia squamulicola – hazel catkins – uncommon, late winter, catkins
Contarinia verrucicola – Native Tilia – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Craneiobia tuba – cornus – rare – summer, leaves
Dasineura carbonaria – euthamia – rare? – summer, terminal
Dasineura collinsoniae – citronella horse balm – uncommon – early summer, leaves
Dasineura communis – sugar maple – scattered, locally common – late spring, leaves
Dasineura crataegibedeguar – hawthorn – uncommon, more common in NE Ohio – late spring, leaves
Dasineura gleditchiae – honey locust – common? – spring, leaves
Dasineura investita – wood nettle (Laportea) – widespread, locally common – very late spring/summer, leaves, stems, flowers
Dasineura involuta – wood nettle (Laportea) – rare – summer, terminal bud
Dasineura lepidii – Lepidium sp. - ?
Dasineura parthenocissi – Virginia Creeper – rare, summer
Dasineura pellex – ash – widespread, common – spring, leaves
Dasineura pilosa – wood nettle (Laportea) – rare – summer, stems, leaves
Dasineura pudibunda – hornbeam – rare – spring, leaves, extreme NE Ohio
Dasineura salicifoliae – Spiraea alba – uncommon, summer, leaves, northern 1/3 of state
Dasineura serrulatae – Alder – uncommon – winter/early spring, bud gall, NE Ohio wetlands
Dasineura tumidosae – ash – rare (in my experience) – spring, leaves, petiole
Dasineura ulmae – Ulmus americana – rare – summer, buds
Gliaspilota glutinosa – carya – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaf spot
Harmandiola helena – Populus grandidentata/tremuloides – uncommon, summer, leaves, northern 2/3 of the state
Iteomyia salicisverruca – willows – uncommon, summer, leaves, wetlands
Janetiella ulmii – Elm – uncommon, summer, leaves
Lasioptera collinsonifolia – citronella horse balm - ? – late spring/summer, leaves
Lasioptera lorrainae – Mountain mint – rare, summer, stems
Lasioptera solani – Solanum carolinense – rare, summer, stems
Macrodiplosis erubescens – oaks – uncommon? – spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis majalis – oaks – locally common – spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis nivepella – oaks – locally common - early spring, leaves
Macrodiplosis qoruca – oaks - ? – spring, leaves
Meunieriella sp – Smilax – uncommon – summer, leaves
Neolasioptera ambrosiae – giant ragweed – rare? – summer, stems
Neolasioptera asclepiae – Asclepias – rare? Never personally observed - ?, stems
Neolasioptera boehmeriae – Boehmeria – uncommon – summer,stems
Neolasioptera clematidis – Clematis – uncommon? – summer, stems
Neolasioptera cornicola – Cornus stononifera - common, stems, wetlands
Neolasioptera convolvuli – Bindweed, uncommon – summer, stems
Neolasioptera eupatorii – Eupatorium – uncommon? (not personally seen) – summer/fall, stems
Neolasioptera farinosa – Rubus – uncommon – summer, leaves
Neolasioptera impatientifolia – Impatiens – widespread, uncommon – summer, leaves-stems
Neolasioptera linderae – Lindera benzoin, uncommon, most visible in winter, stems, Mohican State Park
Neolasioptera lycopi - Lycopus - ? never personally seen -?
Neolasioptera monardi – Monarda fistulosa - ?
Neolasioptera nodulosa – Rubus – uncommon, stems, most visible in winter
Neolasioptera perfoliata – Eupatorium – uncommon – summer, stems
Neolasioptera truncata – Pycnanthemum - ?, stems
Neolasioptera verbesinae – Verbesina – widespread, common – summer, stems, leaf axils
Neolasioptera vernoniae – vernonia – widespread, common – summer, leaves, stems
Neolasioptera vitinea – grape – uncommon – summer, stems
Obolodiplosis robiniae – black locust – uncommon, summer, leaves
Parallelodiplosis subtruncata – cornus – uncommon – summer, leaf spot
Peracecis fugitiva – celtis – uncommon, W Ohio – summer, leaves
Pilodiplosis helianthibula - sunflower - western ohio, common in prairie areas – early summer, leaves
Polystepha americana – red oaks - ?, summer, leaf veins
Polystepha globosa – red oaks – widespread, common – summer, leaves
Polystepha pilulae – red oaks – widespread, common – very late spring-fall, leaves
Polystepha podagrae – red oaks - ? – summer, leaf veins
Polystepha quercifolia – red oaks – uncommon – spring-fall, leaves
Rabdophaga ridigae – Salix – widespread, uncommon – fresh galls early summer, persistant throughout year, stems
Rabdophaga salicisbatatus – Salix sp – uncommon, summer persistent throughout year, stems
Rabdophaga salicisbrassicoides – Salix sp. – Uncommon, summer, buds, wetlands, Erie County
Rabdophaga salicisgnaphalioides – Salix sp. – uncommon, buds
Rabdophaga salicistriticoides – Salix cordata, Salix humilis – rare, summer, stems
Rabdophaga strobiloides – Salix - widespread, common – fresh galls early summer, persistent throughout year, terminal bud
Resseliella clavula – Cornus racemosa, other cornus – rare, late spring, stems, native prairie sites
Resseliella globosa – copperleaf – uncommon – early summer, stems
Resseliella liriodendri – Liriodendron – widespread, common – summer, fall, leaves
Resseliella tulipiferae – Liriodendron - summer, leaves
Rhopalomyia anthophila – Solidago – Rare – late summer, flowers
Rhopalomyia capitata – Solidago – common – summer, terminal bud
Rhopalomyia clarkei – Solidago rugosa, S. altissima - NE corner of the state
Rhopalomyia fusiformae – Euthamia – uncommon – summer, multiple plant parts
Rhopalomyia hirtipes - Solidago junacea - ? never personally seen, summer, terminal bud
Rhopalomyia pedicellata – Euthamia – uncommon – summer, multiple plant parts
Rhopalomyia solidaginis – Solidago – widespread, common – summer, terminal bud
Sackenomyia commota – viburnum – uncommon, late spring/summer, leaves
Schizomyia eupatoriflorae – Ageratina – widespread, uncommon – late summer, flowers
Schizomyia impatientis – Impatiens – widespread, uncommon – summer, flowers
Schizomyia racemicola – solidago – common – summer, flowers
Schizomyia verbesinae – Verbesina – uncommon – summer, flowers
Taxodiomyia cupressiananassa – Taxodium – more common as you move southwest, very common in Cincinnati – summer/fall, leaves
Thecodiplosis brachynteroides - Virginia pine - ?, summer, needles, SE ohio, probably as far east as Adams County
Vitisiella brevicauda – native grapes – uncommon – late spring/summer, stems, leaves, tendrils

Gall Mites
Acalitus ferrugineum – beech – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Acalitus longisetosus – River birch - ? never personally observed – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria campestricola – elm – common? – spring, leaves
Aceria caryae – carya – common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria caulis – black walnut – widespread, common – early summer, petiole
Aceria celtis – celtis – widespread, common – throughout year, witches broom
Aceria cephalanthi - buttonbush – uncommon – early summer, leaves
Aceria cinereae – butternut – common on host, but host is uncommon – early summer leaves
Aceria dina – black tupelo – widespread, uncommon – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria elongata – sugar maple – rare? More common north and east – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria fraxini – ash – widespread, common – spring/summer - leaves
Aceria fraxiniflora – ash – uncommon – spring, flowers
Aceria major – red maple – common, but rarer than other maple erineum mites – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria modesta – sugar maple – common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria mori – mulberry – uncommon – throughout year, witches broom
Aceria negundi – box elder – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria nyssae – black tupelo – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria parulmi – elm – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Aceria parapopuli – Populus - ? never personally observed - ?
Aceria querci – bur oak - widespread, common – Late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria spicati - Mountain maple – rare, summer, leaves, Mohican State Park
Aceria theospyri – Persimmon – common on persimmon but the tree is rare – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria trinema – red oaks esp pin oak – widespread, common – most visible mid-spring, leaves
Aceria triplacis – white oak – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aceria vaga – carya – uncommon? – late spring/summer - leaves
Aculops aenigma – Salix – uncommon? – late spring?/Summer?, Flower buds
Aculops euphorbicolus - Euphorbia corrolata - ?, probably more common in the Western part of the state where the host is more common
Aculops rhois – poison ivy - widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Aculus minutissimus – red maple – rare, I have only seen in NE ohio – spring/summer, leaves
Aculus leionotus – river birch – uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Aculus tetranothrix – Salix sp – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Cenalox nyssae – tupelo – uncommon? – late spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes aceris – silver maple – uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes cerasicrumena – black cherry – widespread, common – early spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes emarginatae – choke cherry and other native cherries – widespread, common – very early spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes laevis – Alder – uncommon – spring/summer, leaves
Eriophyes leiosoma – European Tilia - ? – spring?, leaves
Eriophyes pyri – callery pear - ? – spring, leaves
Eriophyes rhoinus – Poison ivy/sumac – uncommon, summer, flowers
Eriophyes tiliae – Native and European Tilia – widespread, common, spring/summer, leaves
Epitrimerus marginemtorquens – callery pear – common - spring/summer, leaves
Phyllocoptes didelphis – Populus grandidentata, tremuloides – uncommon, summer, leaves
Vasates aceriscrumena – sugar maple – widespread, common – early spring, summer, persisting into fall, leaves
Vasates quadripedes – red and sugar maple – widespread, common – early spring/summer, leaves

Hemipterans
Adelges abietis – firs – uncommon - ?, stems
Colopha ulmicola – elms – widespread, common – spring/early summer - leaves
Daktulosphaira vitifoliae – grape – widespread, common – very late spring/summer - leaves
Eriosoma americanum – elm – uncommon – spring/early summer - leaves
Hamamelistes spinosus – witch hazel, river birch – uncommon, more common on river birch – spring/summer - leaves
Hormaphis hamamelidis – witch hazel – widespread, common – spring/summer leaves
Kaltenbachiella ulmifusa - slippery elm -late spring, summer, leaves
Melaphis rhois – sumac – widespread, common – summer, leaves/petiole
Mordwilkoja vagabunda – Populus – rare? – spring, terminal bud
Pachypappa pseudobrysa – Populus deltoides – uncommon, early summer, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisgemma – celtis – uncommon, stems
Pachypsylla celtidisinteneris – celtis - ? (not personally seen) - ?, stems
Pachypsylla celtidismama – celtis - widespread, common – late spring/fall, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisumbilicus – celtis – Western Ohio, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Pachypsylla celtidisvesicula – celtis – widespread, common – late spring/summer, leaves
Pachypsylla venusta – Celtis – widespread, common – late spring/summer, petiole
Pemphigus longicornus – Populus sp. – rare, early summer, leaves
Pemphigus obesinymphae – Populus deltoides – summer, petiole/leafbase
Pemphigus populicaulis – Populus sp – ? – summer, leaf base/petiole
Pemphigus populiglobuli – Populus balsamifera – common on rare host, Geauga county, probably Ashtabula as well, but unconfirmed. early summer, leaf base/petiole
Pemphigus populitransversus – Populus sp – common – summer, petiole
Phylloxera caryaeavellana - uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaecaulis - carya - uncommon - spring, leaves and petioles
Phylloxera caryaeglobuli - carya - common - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaegummosa – Hickory – uncommon– spring persist through summer, leaves
Phylloxera caryaefallax - carya – uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaefoliae - carya - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaemagna – Carya – common, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaeren - carya - spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaesemen - bitternut – widespread, common – very late spring/summer, leaves
Phylloxera caryaesepta - carya - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaescissa – carya – uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera caryaevenae - carya – common, spring/summer, leaves
Phylloxera conica - Carya – spring, leaves
Phylloxera flavoconica - carya - rare - spring, leaves
Phylloxera foveola - carya - uncommon, spring, leaves
Phylloxera killianae - carya - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera notabilis - carya – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera perniciosa – carya – uncommon, spring, leaves/petioles
Phylloxera picta - carya - uncommon– spring, leaves
Phylloxera russellae – carya – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera rimosalis – carya – rare, spring, leaves
Phylloxera spinosa - carya – uncommon, spring, leaves, petioles
Phylloxera subelliptica – carya - ? – spring, leaves/petioles
Phylloxera symmetrica – Carya - ?, spring, leaves
Phylloxera wiedenmanni – carya - ?, spring leaves
Phylloxera williamsi – Carya - ?, spring, leaves
Phylloxerina nyssa – tupelo – uncommon – late spring, leaves
Tetraneura nigriabdominalis – elms – widespread, common, late spring/summer, leaves

Fungi
Apiosporina morbosa – choke cherry – locally common - stems
Cronartium quercuum – pines? – not personally observed - stems
Diaporthe sp. – Bitternut – widespread, uncommon, but will cover entire trees where present – visible year round, stems
Gymnosporangium clavipes – Apples, hawthorns
Gymnosporangium globosum – hawthorns, junipers
Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae – Junipers – Locally common – spring, stems/leaves
Taphrina caerulescens – red oaks – widespread, common – spring/summer, leaves
Taphrina communis – native plums - ? never personally observed – spring, fruits
Taphrina deformans – peach – uncommon – spring, leaves
Taphrina farlowii – black cherry – common – spring, leaves/fruits
Taphrina johansonii – Populus - ? not personally observed - ?, fruits
Taphrina populina – Populus – common – spring, leaves
Taphrina polystichi – Christmas fern – common – spring, leaves
Taphrina ulmi – elm – uncommon – spring, leaves

Sawflies
Euura gracilis – Salix sp – uncommon, early summer, leaves, northern 1/3rd of state
Euura orbitalis – Salix sp. – rare?, summer, lateral buds
Euura proxima (or lookalike) – Salix sp. – uncommon, early summer, leaves
Euura salicisnodus (or lookalike) – Salix sp. – common, summer, persist throughout year, stems
Euura salicisovum – Salix sp. – uncommon, summer, stems – wetlands
Euura salicispisum – Salix sp. – uncommon, summer, leaves – wetlands
Euura salicispommum – Salix sp. – uncommon, summer, leaves – most frequent in wetlands close to Lake Erie

Other
Agrobacterium sp. – various hosts – bacteria, uncommon, often in cultivated situations – visible year round
Agromyza deserta – celtis – agromyzid fly – Uncommon, early summer, stems
Ampeloglypter sesostris – Vitis sp. – beetle – uncommon, summer, stems
Ecdytolopha insiticiana – black locust – moth, common? - ?
Ectoedemia populella – Populus – moth - ? – summer, petiole/leaf base
Epiblema desertana – Euthamia – moth – uncommon, summer, stems
Epiblema scudderiana – Solidago sp – moth - ?, summer, stems
Epiblema strenuata – Ambrosia artemisiifolia – moth – summer, fall
Euhexomyza schineri – Populus tremuloides – Agromyzid fly - summer, stems
Eurosta solidaginis – Solidago – fly, widespread, common – summer, stem
Gnorimoschema gallaeasterella – Various Asteraceae, including Eurybia, Solidago, Symphyotrichum sp – moth, stem swelling
Gnorimoschema gallaesolidaginis – solidago – moth, uncommon – summer, stem
Heliozela aesella – grape - uncommon – early summer, leaves
Pontania sp – Salix sp - Sawfly - Leaves, summer
Smicronyx sculpticollis – Dodder – Beetle – stems, summer
Stagmatophora sexnotella – Trichostemma sp. – moth - uncommon, summer, stems – Ashtabula county
Urophora cardui – thistles – fly ? never personally observed
Walshia amorphella – Amorpha fructicosa – lepidopteran - common, summer, stems

Undescribed gall wasps
Antistrophus sp. S. terebinthinaceum leaf petioles – native prairie sites
Antistrophus sp. S terebinthinaceum flower head galls – native prairie remnants
Antistrophus sp. S. trifoliatum stems
Disholcaspis sp. – Q muehlenbergii – common, summer, stems
Disholcaspis sp. – Q stellata – common, summer, stems
Q alba bead gall – common – early summer/fall, leaves
Q alba red margin spangle – uncommon- summer, leaves
Q alba rugose spangle – uncommon, summer, leaves
Q alba hairy donut – uncommon, summer, leaves
Q alba truncate petiole cluster – very rare, late summer, petioles, Ashland County
Q muehlenbergii - white midrib gall – uncommon – summer, leaves
Q velutina - yellow midrib gall – uncommon – late summer, leaves
Q stellata - "phylloteras-like" spangle – uncommon, late summer, leaves, Darby Plains
Q imbricaria “hole punch” gall – uncommon, spring, leaves, common at Killbuck Marsh SWA
Q velutina fuzzy vein globs – uncommon, fall, midribs
“Q phellos” lemon gall – on shingle oak – uncommon, spring, leaves

Undescribed gall midges
Contarinia - box elder – uncommon – spring, leaves
Contarinia sp - oak - vein gall uncommon – spring, leaves
Polystepha? - red oaks esp shingle oak and black oak - cone gall, uncommon – late summer, leaves
Polystepha shingle oak raspberry gall – uncommon, summer, leaves

Uncertain presence in Ohio (my to-find list)
Wasps
Acraspis longicornus - post oak
Amphibolips coelebs – Red oaks
Amphibolips globulus - blackjack oak - unlikely given known distribution and rarity of host in Ohio
Amphibolips murata - blackjack oak - unlikely given known dist. and rare host
Amphibolips tinctoriae
Andricus clarkei - q alba q stellata
Andricus murtfeldtae - q stellata
Antistrophus laciniatus - Silphium lacinatum - probably unlikely, host rare in ohio, check Lawrence County pops
Antistrophus minor - S. lacinatum - unlikely, host rare, check Lawrence county pops
Antistrophus rufus - S. lacinatum - unlikely, host rare, check Lawrence county pops
Antistrophus silphii – S.integrifolium/S. lacinatum - unlikely hosts rare
Aulacidea abdita - Latuca canadensis
Aulacidea annulata - Latuca/Prenanthes
Aulacidea harringtoni - Latuca floridana
Aulacidea nabali - Nabalus
Aulacidea pilosellae - Pilosella
Biorhiza caepuliformis - red oaks
Callirhytis balanaspis - red oaks, esp black oak
Callirhytis - red oaks - probably unlikely
Callirhytis balanosa - red oaks
Callirhytis crypta - red oaks
Callirhytis electrea -chestnut oak
Callirhytis ellipsoida - swamp white oak
Callirhytis elliptica - q alba
Callirhytis excavata – Red oaks
Callirhytis florensis - blackjack oak - unlikely because of rarity of host
Callirhytis lapillula - swamp white oak
Callirhytis marginata - red oaks
Callirhytis perrugosa - q alba
Callirhytis rubida - red oaks
Callirhytis rugulosa – red oaks
Callirhytis seminosa - red oaks
Callirhytis subcostata - post oak
Callirhytis tuberosa - shingle oak
Callirhytis tubicola - post oak
Callirhytis vaccinii - post oak
Diastrophus bassettii - Rubus procumbens
Diastrophus fragariae - Fragraria virginiana
Diastrophus niger - Potentilla canadensis
Diastrophus radicum - Rubus corchorifolius and R. occidentalis
Diastrophus turgidus – Rubus strigosus
Diastrophus niger – cinquefoil
Diplolepis fusiformans subsp. fusiformans - Rosa arkansana/Rosa blanda/Rosa woodsii - probaly unlikely hosts rare or not present in Ohio
Diplolepis gracilis – Rose - unlikely given known range
Diplolepis ignota – Rose, R. carolina most prevelant Ohio host
Diplolepis nodulosa – Rose - unlikely
Diplolepis pustulatoides - rose
Diplolepis radicum - R. carolina
Diplolepis spinosa – Rose - unlikely
Diplolepis tuberculosa - rose -
Disholcaspis bassetti - bur oak / swamp white oak
Disholcaspis spongiosa - post oak / white oak
Disholcaspis terrestris - post oak/white oak
Dryocosmus favus - red oaks
Eumayria enigma - red oaks
Eumayria floridana - red oaks
Eumayria saltata - red oaks
Holocynips badia - white oaks
Holocynips maxima - white oaks
Loxaulus beutenmuelleri - red oak
Loxaulus humilis - post oak
Loxaulus illinoisensis - white oak/bur oak
Loxaulus vaccinii - post oak
Melikaiella corrugis - red oaks
Melikaiella fructicola - red oaks
Melikaiella fructuosa - red oaks
Melikaiella papula - red oaks
Neuroterus affinis - Q. prinoides
Neuroterus bassettii - q alba
Neuroterus consimilis - q alba
Neuroterus contortus - post oak
Neuroterus distortus - swamp white oak / chestnut oak
Neuroterus exiguissimus - q alba
Neuroterus exiguus - post oak
Neuroterus gillettei - post oak
Neuroterus pallidus - white oaks
Neuroterus papillosus - swamp white oak / chestnut oak
Neuroterus perminimus - q alba / q bicolor
Neuroterus tectus - chestnut oak
Neuroterus vernus - bur oak
Odontocynips nebulosa - post oak
Philonix gigas - post oak
Philonix pallipes - q alba
Phylloteras sigma – q alba
Sphaeroteras melleum - post oak
Trigonaspis polita - q alba / q stellata - unlikely given known geography
Trigonaspis quercusforticorne – bur oak
Trigonaspis radicola - q alba / q stellata
Zapatella davisae - red oaks
Zapatella oblata - scarlet oak
Zapatella quercusmedullae - red oaks

Midges
Ametrodiplosis geminata – Mountain mint, midsummer
Asphondylia autumnalis – Helenium –
Asphondylia azaleae – Rhododendron –
Asphondylia diervillae – Northern Bush Honeysuckle –
Asphondylia hydrangeae – Hydrangea arborescens
Asphondylia lacinariae – Liatris pycnostachya –
Asphondylia recondita – Asters, rosette gall
Asphondylia rosulata - solidago
Asphondylia sambuci – Elderberry bud gall
Asphondylia smilacinae – Smilacina racemosa
Asphondylia silva – Bluestem goldenrod –
Caryomyia caminata –
Caryomyia cynipsea –
Caryomyia hirtiglobus
Caryomyia spherica
Caryomyia turbanella
Caryomyia turbinata
Clinodiplosis apocyni – hemp dogbane
Clinodiplosis hastata– Verbena hastata
Clinodiplosis lappa – Spiraea salicifolia –
Clinodiplosis rhododendri – Rhododendron
Clinodiplosis spiraeina – spiraea alba
Contarinia clarkei – Spiraea alba
Contarinia juniperiana – Juniper sp.
Contarinia nucicola – hickory –
Contarinia pyrivora – Pyrus communis
Contarinia virginianiae – chokecherry
Cystiphora canadensis – Nabalus
Dasineura americana – Galium asprellum
Dasineura anemone – Anemone canadensis
Dasineura aromaticae – Mentha arvensis, Mentha spicata
Dasineura dentatae – chestnut
Dasineura folliculi – Solidago
Dasineura johnsoni – Vitis spp
Dasineura laquerrarum – Mountain mint
Dasineura lysimachiae – Lysimachia quadrifolia, terrestris
Dasineura mali – Apple
Dasineura piperitae – Mentha gentilis, Mentha piperita
Dasineura plicata – Salix sp.
Dasineura porrecta – Ulmus americana
Dasineura pseudacaciae – black locust
Dasineura pyri – Pyrus communis
Dasineura rhodophaga – Roses (cultivated)
Dasineura sassafras – Sassafras
Dasineura semenivora – Viola spp
Dasineura smilacifolia – Smilax spp
Dasineura toweri – Hypericum mutilum
Dasineura trifolii – Clover
Dasineura urnicola – Urtica dioica
Harmandiola stebbinsae – bigtooth aspen
Iteomyia salicifolia - willows
Janetiella asplenifolia – Myrica asplenifolia
Lasioptera cylindrigallae – Euthamina
Lasioptera excavata – Crataegus sp.
Lasioptera humulicaulis – Humulus
Lasioptera lactucae – Lactuca Canadensis
Lasioptera spiraeafolia – Spiraea densiflora, douglasii, salicifolia
Macrodiplosis castaneae – Chestnut
Meunieriella aquilonia – honey locust
Neolasioptera brevis – honey locust
Neolasioptera clematidis – Clematis
Neolasioptera desmodii – tick trefoil
Neolasioptera erigeroni - fleabane
Neolasioptera fontagrensis – Celastrus scandens
Neolasioptera galeosidis – Galeopsis
Neolasioptera hibisci – Hibiscus
Neolasioptera menthae – Mentha sp
Neolasioptera pierrei – Elderberrry
Neolasioptera rudbeckiae - Rudbeckia
Neolasioptera triadenii – Triadenum virginicum
Neolasioptera viburnicola – viburnum dentatum
Olpodiplosis helianthi – Helianthus
Polystepha podagrae - black oak
Polystepha pustulata black oak
Polystepha pustuloides - black oak
Polystepha serrata - scarlet oak
Polystepha simpla - black oak
Polystepha sobrina - black oak
Prodiplosis myricae – Myrica cerifera
Prodiplosis morrisi – Populus sp.
Prodiplosis platani – Platanus occidentalis
Prodiplosis violicola – Viola spp
Rabdophaga cephalanthi – Cephalanthus occidentalis
Rabdophaga globosa – willows
Rabdophaga racemi – willows
Rabdophaga salicis - willows
Rabdophaga saliciscornu – Salix humilis
Rabdophaga saliciscoryloides - Salix
Rabdophaga salicisrhodoides – Salix sp
Rabdophaga salicisnodulus – willows
Rabdophaga salicisstrobiliscus -willows
Rabdophaga timberlakei – willows
Rabdophaga tumidosae - willows
Rhopalomyia castanae – Chestnut
Rhopalomyia chrysanthemi –cultivated chrysanthemums
Rhopalomyia gemmaria - asters
Rhopalomyia grossulariae – Ribes grossularia
Rhopalomyia inquisitor – Solidago
Rhopalomyia lobata – Euthamia
Rhopalomyia sp. – Asters, floret gall
Rhopalomyia strobiligemma – Panicled aster
Rhopalomyia weldi – Bigleaf Aster
Sackenomyia viburnifolia – viburnum dentatum
Schizomyia umbellicola – Elderberry
Schizomyia viburni – Viburnum

Mites
Acalitus brevitarsus - Alder
Acalitus calycophthirus - paper birch - unlikely given rarity of host
Aceria dispar – Quaking Aspen
Aceria neoessigi – Populus sp.
Aceria parapopuli – Quaking aspen
Acalitus phyllereus – Alder
Acalitus rudis – Paper birch
Aceria kuko - Lycium
Aculus craspedobius –willows
Aculus laevigatae – willows
Aculus micheneri – willows
Aculus niphocladae – willows
Aculops ailanthii – Ailanthus
Cenalox conyssae - tupelo
Colomerus vitis – Grape
Eriophyes betulae – birch buds
Eriophyes helicantyx - bracken fern
Eriophyes paraviburni – viburnum
Eriophyes semen - willows
Phytopus avellana – hazel

Hemiptera
Pachypappa sacculi - Populus sp.
Pemphigus betae – balsam popular, unlikely due to rarity of host
Pemphigus monophagus – balsam popular, unlikely due to rarity of host
Pemphigus nortonii – populus deltoides
Pemphigus populiramulorum = Populus sp
Pemphigus populivenae
Pemphigus spyrothecae – European Populus sp.
Pemphigus tartareus – Populus deltoides –
Phylloxera crypta - carya - leaf
Phylloxera devastatrix - pecan - leaf
Phylloxera falsostium - carya - leaf
Phylloxera myristica - carya - leaf
Phylloxera paludis
Phylloxera pilosula - carya - leaf
Phylloxera stoetzelae - carya - leaf
Phylloxera subelliptica - carya – petiole
Tetraneura ulmi – Elms
Thecabius gravicornis – Populus balsamifera
Thecabius lysimachiae – European populus sp.
Thecabius populiconduplifolius – Populus sp.
Thecabius populimonilis – balsam poplar

Fungi
Taphrina americana - birch
Taphrina betulina - birch
Taphrina carveri – maple
Taphrina coryli - hazel
Taphrina ostryae - Hophornbeam
Taphrina robinsoniana – alder
Taphrina wisneri - cherry
Pear rust

Other
Agrilus politus – willows –
Caloptilia murtfeldtella – Penstemon sp. - moth
Euura consors – willows
Euura cooperae – willows
Euura cosensii – willows
Euura crassicornis – willows
Euura lucidae – willows
Euura petiolaridis – willows
Euura salicisdesmodioides – willows
Euura salicisovulum – willows
Euura exiguae - Salix – sawflies
Eurosta lateralis – Solidago odora – Tephritid fly
Gnorimoschema busckiella – Symphyotrichum patens- moth – stems
Gnorimoschema gibsoniella – Solidago rigida – moth – stems
Gnorimoschema jocelynae – Solidago gigantea – moth stems
Gnorimoschema salinaris – Solidago juncea, ulmifolia – moth – stems
Gnorimoschema septentrionella – asters – stems
Gnorimoschema subterranean – Symphyotrichum ericoides – moth - stems
Lixus musculus – Polygonum – beetle
Mompha rufocristatella – Oenothera gaura – lepidoptera
Mompha stellata – Oenothera biennis - lepidoptera
Pseudomonas savastanoi – Forsythia – bacteria

Publicado el septiembre 16, 2022 09:59 TARDE por calconey calconey | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

27 de mayo de 2022

Ohio Spring Oak Gall Wasp Report 2022

This is perhaps a bit premature considering there is a final flush of what I consider to be spring galls still to arrive (Amphibolips nublipennis among a few others) but here is a summary of my observations of this years gall wasp season in Ohio (mostly NE Ohio, but a couple trips to NW, W an S Ohio are included here as well).

Appearing well before leafout

Neuroterus vesicula
First appeared in mid-March on the usual first tree on the College of Wooster campus, earliest observation of this species for me so far. Common this year, as usual, with a little hunting and the right timing this is on nearly every Quercus alba in NE Ohio.
Most common host: Q alba
Also seen on: Q macrocarpa, Q bicolor (both with slightly different coloration phenotypes)

Appearing slightly before or with leafout

Callirhytis gallaestriatae
First appeared in Mid-April this year a bit behind normal schedule. Less common than last year, present on the usual trees but in fewer numbers.
Most common host: Quercus palustris

Andricus pisiformis
First appeared in mid-late April. Was an good year for these, which seem to have a patchy distribution, common in some areas and absent from others. In three years of observations this has had an 2020- high, 2021 – low, 2022 – high, pattern so far.
Most common host: Quercus alba
Also seen on: Quercus stellata (SE/S Ohio, and WV)

Andricus coronus
First appeared in early May. Appears to be very rare in NE Ohio, I know of only one site. Consistently appear at this site every year.
Most common host: Quercus palustris

Amphibolips ellipsoidalis
First appeared very late April. Good year for these which appear to be consistent year-over-year. Somewhat patchy distribution, but can be found at most sites with significant Q. imbricaria populations if you look hard enough.
Most common host: Quercus imbricaria
Also seen on: Q. rubra, Q. velutina

Appearing with or slightly after leafout
Most of the following were slightly behind when I have observed them in the past this year, although I think we have almost caught up to normal as of now.

Andricus comota/Neuroterus clarkae
First appeared Mid-May. Not sure how to tell these apart. Uncommon. Usually find these in wild areas as opposed to cultivated/disturbed areas.
Host: Q alba

Dryocosmus quercuspalustris (DQP)
First appeared early May, definitely behind last year by at least a week. Huge populations this year, as usual. 100s-1000s of galls on some trees. One of the most reliable galls, year-over-year.
Most common host: Q. palustris
Other hosts: Q. imbricaria, Q. rubra, Q. velutina

Dryocosmus quercusnotha
1st Appeared early May. Bumper year for these, absolutely incredible infestation levels on some trees and on nearly every Q. palustris tree in NE Ohio. Never seen this to even close this level before.
Most common host: Q palustris

Dryocosmus q-imbricaria-sack-gall
https://www.gallformers.org/gall/4266
First appeared in early May. Huge populations this year. A fairly common gall year-over-year. Have not documented well in the past, but typically have decent population levels. Definitely higher than in the past this year.
Host: Q imbricara

q-palustris-small-bud-gall
https://www.gallformers.org/gall/4260
First appeared in Mid-May. Unsure of rarity as I have not intensively looked for this species, but seems to be uncommon. Like a shiny N. vesicula.
Host: Q palustris

Dryocosmus cinerae
First appeared in Mid-May. Fairly common, much more common than reported, on most Q. rubra if you look hard enough. Have never looked for them intensively enough to get an idea of year-over-year population fluctuations.
Most common host: Q rubra
Also seen on: Q imbricaria

Q-phellos-lemon-gall
https://www.gallformers.org/gall/4262
First appeared in Mid-May. First year I have noticed these, at first thought they were odd DQP galls but they have a different internal structure. Fairly common this year (though not even close to the Dryocosmus sp in numbers). At least a half dozen of these on most Q imbricaria in the Wayne county area.
Most common host: Q imbricaria
Also seen on: Q rubra

Amphibolips quercusinanis
First appeared Mid-May. Most common of the Oak Apples in NE Ohio. Still not super common, high populations on the same trees year-over-year. Absent at most sites.
Most common host: Q rubra

Amphibolips confluenta
Mid-May. Uncommon. In my experience more common in more “wild” areas. Have not observed frequently enough to notice any patterns.
Most common host: Q. velutina

Amphibolips quercusoostensackenii
Mid-May. Can usually find on most Q. rubra trees. Not in nearly as large of numbers as DQP. Easy to confuse with DQP. Consistent populations year-over-year.
Most common host: Q. rubra

Neuroterus quercusirregularis
Mid-May. Uncommon, see only occasionally with little pattern to its appearance.
Most common hosts: Q alba, Q stellata (S Ohio)

Dryocosmus floridensis
Mid-May. Common in NE Ohio and especially Wayne County. Common year-over-year on the same trees. Perhaps slightly down this year compared to last year, but not by much.
Most common host: Q. imbricaria
Other hosts: Q. velutina, Q rubra, Q schumardii, Q coccinea, Q palustris

Callirhytis quercusventricosa
Mid-Late May. Uncommon, highest populations that I have seen this year, still not common. Previously thought these were more common on the prairie Q imbricaria populations, but have found quite a few of them on Killbuck swamp Q imbricaria this year.
Most common host: Q imbricaria

Amphibolips acuminata
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/118442118
…or whatever these turn out to be. Appear Mid-Late May. Common in this area. High populations year-over-year on the same trees. Highest populations in swampy areas (Killbuck Swamp, Jackson Bog). Hope to rear to confirm/deny their identity.
Host: Q imbricaria

Q-imbricaria-nipple-gall
https://www.gallformers.org/gall/4259
Late May. Uncommon. Lower populations this year compared to the last two. Patchy distribution, most frequent in the Killbuck Swamps and surrounding area. Used to think this was Amphibolips qrugosa but does not match the description as well as some other galls. Will attempt to rear this year to confirm or deny this fact.
Host: Q. imbricaria

Andricus quercusfutilis
Late May. Very common as they are every year, at nearly every site with a significant Q alba population.
Host: Q alba

Callirhytis seminator
Mid-Late May. Uncommon, one of the few galls I think is overreported due to its charisma. Spotty distribution here in NE Ohio. Frequent at a few sites, but rare or absent elsewhere. Have seen a half dozen or so this year, more than any previous year, but that is an incredibly tiny number compared to many galls on this list.
Host: Q alba

Andricus quercuspeticola
Mid-Late May. Very common but patchy distribution. Common again this year, and there seems to be little fluctuation in populations year-over-year. Have not observed a pattern in preferred host, seems to be equally distributed on most white oak species.
Hosts: Q. alba, Q. macrocarpa, Q. bicolor

Andricus quercusutriculus
Mid-Late May. Common, easy to miss as it is not charismatic. Probably on most white oaks, if one was to look.
Host: Q alba, Q stellata (S/W Ohio)

Callirhytis quercusoperator
Mid-Late May. Rare in NE Ohio. Only one observation at a weird urban site. Judging by iNat observations is more common elsewhere.
Observed host: Q imbricaria

Callirhytis flavipes
Late May. Rare, but possibly just overlooked. Consistently on the same trees every year. Common on the OSU-Wooster campus, rarely observed elsewhere.
Host: Q. macrocarpa

Andricus foliaformis
Late May. Rare. On the same trees every year but some fluctuation. This year a down year compared to last year.
Host: Q macrocarpa

Less conspicuous galls observed (not sure if actually rare or just overlooked): Andricus chinquapin, Neuroterus minutus, Neuroters escharensis

Rare galls observed: Callirhytis nigrae, Callirhytis exigua, Callirhytis confusa, Q imbricaria bud gall (Zapatella oblata?), Q imbricaria “sparkle” gall

Not observed this year: Callirhytis parva, Callirhytis pulchra, Melikaiella tumifica, Acraspis gemula

Post leaf out (still to come, or just starting)
Amphibolips nublipennis, Amphibolips globus, Melikaiella ostensackenii, Callirhytis balanacea and a few others.

Publicado el mayo 27, 2022 09:17 TARDE por calconey calconey | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

28 de enero de 2022

Ohio Grassland Sites

In 2021 I attempted to visit many of the sites listed in the 1979 classic Ohio Prairie Survey Project by Allison Cusick and Roger Troutman to update their condition. This is an ongoing project and I will continue to update this map as long as I am in Ohio.
https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1H9nZjlmfNgVPIPGNZv57dkC8LM7iid6M&usp=sharing

I think they were relatively loose on their definition of "prairie" in the book and I continue the theme here including grassland sites that might not qualify as prairie sites including, savannas, barrens, and wetter sites such as fen meadows.

There were many sites in the book that I am uncertain of their exact location and was thus unable to visit. If anyone is aware of any sites that are not on this map feel free to add.

Ohio does not have a lot of grassland sites, but many of them are well managed and offer excellent examples of their types
Must visit Ohio grasslands:
1. Darby Plains prairie (Champaign, Union, Madison, Franklin, Pickaway counties)
Prior to European settlement the largest prairie region in Ohio. Near and dear to my heart as I grew up in Southern Union County.
Good natural history here:
http://images.library.wisc.edu/EcoNatRes/EFacs/NAPC/NAPC06/reference/econatres.napc06.cking.pdf
Plant list:
https://ohioplants.org/darby-plains-prairie-plants/
Recommended sites: Milford Center Prairie State Nature Preserve (SNP), Bigelow Cemetary SNP, Smith Cemetary SNP - eye popping color and diversity from July-September. The imagination is overwhelmed by what this region must have looked like prior to agriculture. Seem to have been very well managed in recent years as I have noticed prescribed burns and increasing diversity.
Pearl King Savanna SNP - permit required. No trails. Wonderful bur oak/post oak savanna. The only extant example of this type of site that is on public land. As a fan of post oaks this is one of my favorite sites in the state.
Columbus metroparks has attempted a large-scale restoration at Batelle Darby Creek and Prairie Oaks Metroparks, but the diversity does not come close to the sites mentioned above.

2. Sandusky plains prairie/savanna (Marion, Wyandot and Crawford counties)
The second biggest prairie area in the state. The eastern-most extension of the "Prairie Peninsula". Incredible diversity with many plants not found elsewhere in the state.
Some natural history:
https://www.jstor.org/stable/4034237
https://www.jstor.org/stable/4034303
Recommended sites:
Daughmer Savanah SNP - glorious bur oak savanna, to my knowledge the best preserved in the state. An oak lovers dream. Big enough that you feel separate from the surrounding agricultural landscape. Clairidon Railroad Prairie - Incredible floral diversity at this site, possibly the single most diverse prairie site in the state. Has a historical marker, but to my knowledge not officially preserved in any way. Needs some management, would love to see this become a state nature preserve

3. Castalia Prairie (Erie County)
Absolutely glorious wet prairie site. One of the larger extant sites in the state. Incredible prairie dock and Asclepias tuberosa populations that overwhelm the senses.
https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_etd/send_file/send?accession=osu1272376477&disposition=inline
Site now a part of Resthaven State Wildllife Area.
Lake Erie Sand Barrens SNP is very close to this site and also worth a visit.

4. Miami River Watershed Prairies/Fens (Logan, Champaign, Miami, Greene and Montgomery counties)
Lots of interesting glacial history here.
https://kb.osu.edu/handle/1811/22204
https://images.library.wisc.edu/EcoNatRes/EFacs/NAPC/NAPC06/reference/econatres.napc06.shuston.pdf
Gallagher Fen SNP, Cedar Bog SNP, Pearls Fen (Greene County Parks) - Stunningly beautiful with many rare plants.
Good Prairie SNP, Stillwater Praire Preserve (Miami County Parks) - A little more subtle than the above sites, but still worth a visit, IMO.

5. Adams County openings/barrens
Probably the most famous grasslands in the state, studied by Lucy Braun. The Arc of Appalachia preserves and state nature preserves in the county are incredibly well managed and will take your breath away.
http://images.library.wisc.edu/EcoNatRes/EFacs/NAPC/NAPC06/reference/econatres.napc06.acusick.pdf
https://www.adamscountytravel.org/ADAMS_HIKE_FINAL.pdf
Lynx Prairie (Edge of Appalachia)- Another one with incredible floristic diversity
Chapparel Prairie SNP, Adams Lake SNP - I might be biased with these because they are probably the two best Post-Oak Openings on public land in the state.

6. NE Ohio fens/bogs
Again lots of glacial history here.
Lots of options here but my favorites for fen/sedge meadows are Herrick Fen (The Nature Conservancy) in Portage county and Jackson Bog SNP in Stark County.

7. Lucas County Prairies/Fen Meadows/Sand Barrens
Really unique area with the juxtaposition of very wet and very dry sites. Lots of northernmost/southernmost range extensions are present here. Worst mosquitoes in the state too, lol.
https://whitehouseoh.gov/Forms/Public-Service/Oak-Openings-Guide-3rd-Edition-2016.pdf
Irwin Prairie SNP - a massive sedge meadow, probably my favorite of that type in the state.
Kitty Todd SNP - A dryer site with overwhelming color and diversity.
Oak Openings Metropark - most of the park is oak savanna but has a totally different feel to other savannas in the state with very sandy soil.

What are your must-see Ohio grasslands? Are there any super cool sites I am missing? I am particularly interested in visiting some of the barrens contained in Wayne National Forest and Shawnee State Forest this year.

Publicado el enero 28, 2022 10:12 TARDE por calconey calconey | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

19 de enero de 2022

2022 Goals and trips

Goals for this year, as time allows -

  • Further exploration of Ohio's gall fauna.

Priorities include:
Extensive sampling of hickories for Phylloxera species in the spring.

Sampling of post oak sites in spring for early galls on that species, definitely the Darby Plains sites and hopefully including an Adams County trip as well.

Extensive sampling of willows and Populus species for various galls, especially in NE Ohio, NW Ohio and the Miami River wetlands. Interested in more data on which Pemphigus, Euura and Rabdophaga species are found in Ohio.

Clermont county trip to find sugar hackberry population there and document any galls found.

Trip to Compass Plant SNP to look for Antistrophus sp galls.

Continue to look for native rose sites for Diplolepis galls, esp in areas outside of NE Ohio

Collection of more previously undescribed species

  • Daily (ish) monitoring of local sites for gall phenology "what appears when", as well as abundance for various locally available species
  • Continue traveling to Ohio grassland sites to update the status of sites listed in Cusick and Troutman, 1979. See google map: https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1H9nZjlmfNgVPIPGNZv57dkC8LM7iid6M&usp=sharing
  • Continue to survey for rarer Ohio oak species - Post Oak, Blackjack Oak, Southern Red Oak in particular in counties that I have missed in the past - Meigs, Gallia, Lawrence and maybe Monroe. Perhaps the more well-traveled Hocking and Athens counties as well that I have skipped in recent years due to crowds.
  • Hit every Ohio county that I have yet to travel to: Extreme NW (WIlliams, Defiance, Fulton), SW (Preble, Clermont, Brown), Extreme S (Meigs, Lawrence, Gallia) and random E (Trumbull, Jefferson, Monroe)

Trips

  • Spring - North and central Florida. Document spring galls on various oak species not present in Ohio.
  • Summer - Central Illinois and Iowa prairie tour including Iowa post oak sites.
  • Summer/fall - Quick weekend return trip to central KY to look for Celticecis galls, west to Posey County, IN to document extreme northern edge of overcup oak and sugar hackberry gall species in S. Indiana/NC KY.
  • Birthday trip - Mississippi delta - Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi, hopefully, undersampled areas. Particularly interested in Overcup oak, sugar hackberry and bald cypress sites.
Publicado el enero 19, 2022 10:25 TARDE por calconey calconey | 4 comentarios | Deja un comentario

09 de noviembre de 2021

Gaps in Eastern US Oak Gall-Host Relationships - Southwest Texas addendum

An addendum on yesterdays post, this is mostly for @ericanewman not sure if you will be visiting Brewster County, Val Verde County or Mt. Livermore while you are working in W. Texas, but just in case you or anyone else are in those areas there are a bunch of oak rare species with almost totally undescribed gall fauna.

Quercus carmenensis
Chisos Mountains, Brewster County, TX
"Shrublands and woodlands on limestone"
Very rare, probably just a few trees/clumps.
No documented gall species.

Quercus depressipes
High elevation of the Davis Mountains, Jeff Davis County, TX
"Grassland and open wooded slopes"
Very rare.
No documented gall species.

Quercus graciliformis/canbyi
Chisos Mountains, rocky canyons with high water table, Brewster County, TX
"Dry rocky canyons of the Chisos Mountains"
Rare.
No documented gall species.

Quercus gravesi
TX
"Davis, Glass, and Chisos mountains; above 1200 m"
Fairly common compared to others on this list
1 documented gall species

Quercus hinckleyi
El Solitario and near Shafter, Presidio County, TX
"On dry desert slopes"
No documented gall species.

Quercus intricata
Brewster County, TX
"Open chaparral and pinyon-oak woodland, on dry, rocky, limestone slopes (in Mexico also on gypsophilous soils)"
No documented gall species.

Quercus polymorpha
Val Verde County TX
" Riparian forest gallery, margins of thorn scrub, dry tropical forest, lower margins of oak-pine woodland, and cloud forest"
Only one known native US population, along the Devil's River near Dolan Falls. Widely planted in TX as an ornamental, ornamental populations would be interesting to look for galls as well.
2 documented gall species.

Quercus pungens
AZ NM TX
"On dry limestone or igneous slopes, usually in oak, pinyon, and juniper woodlands, chaparral, and sometimes descending into desert vegetation"
6 documented gall species

Quercus robusta
Brewster County, TX
"Moist wooded canyons in Chisos Mountains"
No documented gall species.

Quercus tardifolia
Brewster County, TX
"Wooded arroyos"
Very rare and uncertain status as a species.
No documented gall species.

Here is a nice article on a few of these oak species;
https://www.internationaloaksociety.org/content/scouting-and-collecting-rare-oaks-trans-pecos-ex-situ-conservation-2016

This paper focusing on Mexican oak species found the following number of gall "morphotypes" (they did not ID to species) on the species listed above. Some of these morphotypes are probably IDed to speceis in the literature, but many others may not be described.
http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2007-42982017000300461
Q. gravesii - 4 morphotypes
Q. depressipes - 1 morphotype
Q. polymorpha - 2 morphotypes

Publicado el noviembre 9, 2021 04:12 TARDE por calconey calconey | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de noviembre de 2021

Gaps in Eastern US Oak Gall-Host Relationships

If anyone wants to contribute to our knowledge of galls in the eastern US, one area would be to take a look at some of the less (or un) documented host species (shoutout to @ericanewman who is looking at some of the Texas species). If you have a local patch of any of these oak species, it would be valuable to go out and see if you can find any galls on them. Given the host specificity of some gall species, you might even find something new to science. If anyone is willing to share any sites where any of these species are common (most likely place to find galls), feel free to send me a DM as I am going to try and hunt for some of these next year (Florida in the spring and somewhere in the AL/MS/AR/LA range in summer).

Underdocumented host list:

  • Quotes below from the Flora of North America (FNA)
  • For known gall species lists see www.gallformers.org and search for the host.
  • Gall # below are as of the date of this post and include gall-like scales and known but undescribed species.

Quercus acerifolia
AR, according to @destes on this observation (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/12424063) locally common on the Cumberland Plateau of SE TN, as well as NW GA and NE AL.
"Dry glades, slopes, and ridge tops"
No documented gall species.

Quercus arkansana
AL AR FL GA LA MS TX
"An understory tree of well-drained, sandy soils, on ravine heads (pocosins, steepheads)"
No documented gall species.

Quercus austrina
AL FL GA MS NC SC
"River bottoms, wet forests, flatwoods"
1 documented gall species.

Quercus boyntonii
AL TX
"Deep sands and crevices in pine forests, along streams"
Probably similar/same gall fauna as Q. stellata.
No documented gall species.

Quercus ellipsoidalis
IL IN IA MI MN MO ND OH WI ON
"Dry sandy sites, rarely on moderately mesic slopes or uplands"
Looks to be common in upper midwest. Underdocumented bc it can be confused with other oak species. Would be particularly interesting to look at sites where closely related oaks are less common (Maybe N. Minnesota?)
I am not confident that any of the Ohio records for this species are real.
8 documented gall species.

Quercus georgiana
AL GA NC SC
"Granitic outcrops and dry slopes and knolls"
4 documented gall species.

Quercus havardii
AZ CO KS NM OK TX UT
"Deep, shifting or stabilized sand dunes, off deep sands in putative hybrid populations"
Looks to be fairly common on the high plains of W. Texas and Oklahoma, maybe along the caprock escarpment as well.
7 documented gall species. Good potential for unique species.

Quercus hemisphaerica
AL AR FL GA LA MD MS NC PA SC TX VA
"Moderately dry sandy soils, scrub sandhills, stream banks, occasionally on hillsides and ravines."
Lack of documentation likely due to the taxonomic confusion between this and Q. laurifolia. Should be fairly easy to ID based on site location. Fairly common in the SE.

11 documented gall species.

Quercus inopina
FL
"On deep white "sugar" sands of low sandhill ridges, scrub communities, and flat upland terraces"
Looks to be fairly common in FL. Target for spring trip.
12 documented gall species.

Quercus laceyi
TX
"Limestone hills, woodlands and riparian forests, canyons and streamsides"
Looks to be fairly common in Texas hill country.
12 documented gall species.

Quercus minima
AL FL GA LA MS NC SC
"Coastal plain, open evergreen woodlands and scrublands on deep sandy soils, often as understory with pines"
Looks to be common in Florida. Spring trip target.
12 documented gall species.

Quercus mohriana
NM OK TX
"Limestone hills and slopes, calcareous substrates"
Fairly common in W. - W/C Texas.
2 documented gall species. Great potential for unique species.

Quercus muehlenbergii
AL AR CT FL GA IL IN IA KS KY LA MD MA MI MN MS MO NE NJ NM NY NC OH OK PA SC TN TX VT VA WV WI ON
"Mixed deciduous forest, woodlands and thickets, sometimes restricted to n slopes and riparian habitats in w parts of range, limestone and calcareous soils, rarely on other substrates"
Common in W Ohio and on marblehead Penninsula. According to iNat map fairly common in the Midwest US. Isolated western populations would be interesting to survey (NM, OK, TX) to see if they have any species that the eastern populations lack.
18 documented gall species, probably too high to be on this list, but lacking in the literature and so the more eyes the better.

Quercus oglethorpensis
AL GA LA MS SC
"Alluvial flatwoods and streamsides in rich woods, low pastures, and edge of bottomland forests"
FNA says "locally common in GA and SC"
No documented gall species.

Quercus pumila (frmr elliottii)
AL FL GA MS NC SC
" Dry sandy soils of savannahs, low ridges and oak-pine scrub, occasionally at margins of poorly drained sites"
Looks to be fairly common in Fl, a target for my spring trip.
5 documented gall species

Quercus shumardii
AL AR FL GA IL IN KS KY LA MD MI MS MO NY NC OH OK PA SC TN TX VA WV ON
"Mesic slopes and bottoms, stream banks and poorly drained uplands"
According to the iNat map, most common in TX. Poor documentation is likely to do with how easy it is to confuse with other red oaks.
9 documented gall species.

Quercus texana (frmr nuttalli)
AL AR IL KS KY LA MS MO OK TN TX
"Flood plains and bottomlands"
Looking at the iNat map looks to be fairly common in the Mississippi river delta (particularly LA) and the Houston Metro.
2 documented species
.

Quercus vaseyana
TX
"Dry limestone slopes, oak and mesquite woodlands, juniper woodlands, and canyons and ravines in otherwise dry, open grasslands, sometimes descending into margins of dry scrub"
As I understand it is fairly common in the Texas Hill country. High potential for interesting stuff.
No documented gall species on this host.

In addition to the list above we could use more eyes on Quercus incana and Quercus lyrata as well, even though they are fairly well documented.

Publicado el noviembre 8, 2021 10:09 TARDE por calconey calconey | 3 comentarios | Deja un comentario